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  1. #1
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    Help me get my bike on a diet!

    Not sure if the method I use to weigh my bike is very precise, but pre Goodridge hoses and e13 pedals, my method was saying it was 38.5. so I'm thinking that realistically it could have been anywhere between 38-39. Using the same method with my e13 pedals and goodridge hoses installed, it's saying 39.6, so it could really be as much as 40lbs. I posted a pic for visual reference and my build sheet.

    Frame: large DHR
    Fork: 2011 Fox 40 RC2
    Shock: 2011 Fox DHX RC4
    Handlebar: Renthal Fatbar 780 uncut
    Stem: Function Inertia Project top crown with integrated DM stem
    Shifter/Derailleur: X9
    Chain guide: E13 SRS
    Chain: KMC Gold
    Cranks/BB: first gen E13 LG1 DH
    Brakes: Formula The One with Goodridge hoses
    Wheels: Azonic Outlaw
    Headset: Cane Creek 40
    Grips: Renthal Kevlar
    Saddle: WTB Silverado
    Seat post: Ritchey, not sure the model but definitely on the low end(I.e. heavy)

    A new wheel set is definitely on my list, probably Hope Pro2 with some sort of Mavic EX's. if my maths were correct I should save ~400g over my Outlaws. Seat post would be next, one of the higher end Thompson's preferably. Not sure of the weight on the Ritchey so not sure how much it would save but there would definitely be some sort of savings there. Next would be ti-spring for rear shock and the 40. Can anyone shed some light on how much weight the ti-springs would save? Not sure if these few things are going to get me down to where I want to be, but surely with all that I could be somewhere around 37.5-38. Maybe just wishful thinking. Open to suggestions. Not trying to blow my life savings to save a pound or two so please no rediculous priced items. Not too keen on doing any carbon either.

    This is the most recent picture of it that I have, it's exactly the same except now it has Goodridge and Renthal grips.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help me get my bike on a diet!-image.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Hope/823s are not that light compared to some new wheelsets out there. Mine are about 2,300 grams. But you can then go tubeless easily. With 823s you don't need strips. Tubeless on XC can be a wash with rim strips and Stans sealant. But DH tubes are heavy so it becomes a good weight savings.

    A Ti spring will save 0.5 to 0.75 lbs depending on the spring weight. A big spring will have more to start with, so more to lose.

    Some people run smaller rotors in back.
    You have just been mentally Rick Roll'd. Yup you're thinking about it right now aren't you? Don't fight it.

  3. #3
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    Renthal makes a "lite bar" intended for all mtn, but might work depending on how abusive you ride.
    Ti cassete, left the two lagest gears off mine and replaced with spacers (now it's a 7 spd).
    Goodridge cables are heavier tha stock, switch back to stock.
    Tubless tires, some people get away with kelvlar beads, most people prefere wire bead.
    Use the lighter Thompson post if your within the req weight limit, unless you cut it short enough so there's not much leverage.
    Scram Desecent cranks are lighter than those E-13 cranks. Renthal rings are lighter than stock.
    Ti spokes if you have the budget.
    MRP G2 (or G3)chain guide.
    Ti front spring will save some weight, not sure if weight saving from rear is very significant.
    The guy yo' momma "act" like she don't know!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim F. View Post
    Renthal makes a "lite bar" intended for all mtn, but might work depending on how abusive you ride.
    Ti cassete, left the two lagest gears off mine and replaced with spacers (now it's a 7 spd).
    Goodridge cables are heavier tha stock, switch back to stock.
    Tubless tires, some people get away with kelvlar beads, most people prefere wire bead.
    Use the lighter Thompson post if your within the req weight limit, unless you cut it short enough so there's not much leverage.
    Scram Desecent cranks are lighter than those E-13 cranks. Renthal rings are lighter than stock.
    Ti spokes if you have the budget.
    MRP G2 (or G3)chain guide.
    Ti front spring will save some weight, not sure if weight saving from rear is very significant.
    The ti cassette with spacers is possible. I'd like to keep my Goodridge lines, always wanted some and finally got them for Christmas, I know the performance gains from them are minimal at best, just like the cool factor I guess . and I do have a Renthal ring. Thanks for all the replies.

    I do know the hope/mavic ex combo isn't the lightest, they were just affordable and good value. Do you guys recommend buying a used wheel set to get something lighter/more expensive for a good deal? Obviously I wouldn't get something that's been beat on. If price wasn't an object, what would be the lightest wheel set possible, while still being durable? No carbon.

  5. #5
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    Dee Max ultimates are light. I think Sun/Ringle makes set that's even lighter. Easton make a light set, but I've read that they're crap.

    Buying used could be an option. Have a reliable wheel builder look them over 1st. Hubs tend to hold up well, check the hoops for flat spots, broken welds,cracked eyelets and trueness. Make sure the spokes aren't stretched out. If they have had a few replaced because they popedp, then it's usually a sign they are worn out.
    The guy yo' momma "act" like she don't know!

  6. #6
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    You'll find diminishing returns eventually, and cost-per-lb gets pretty steep...

    For your setup, the obvious is to drop 1 lb+ on the fork by swapping to Boxxer, if weight is your priority. The other obvious is the wheelset, you can get a good one around 1800g from Syntace, DT Swiss, i9, etc. around the $1000 mark.

    You can also swap tires. Schwalbe's Muddy Mary is 200-300g lighter than the Ardent, per tire, and plenty tough.

    Before swapping to Ti cassettes, get a Ti spring for another 400g.

    The above should net about 4 lbs weight drop...
    Go out and ride your bike


  7. #7
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    Agreed on wheels/tubeless setup. Kings on Flow EXs, DB spokes should be strong/ light. If you're super hard on wheels, maybe a heavier duty Mavic rim. Cranks/chainguide probably next area to shave weight. Other options like changing to lighter fork/shock really are a big jump if you're happy with how those two pieces are working for you. Ti on both of those seems pretty spendy for just a straight improvement in weight. At least with wheel/tire and crank you can build in some tangible improvements (less rotating weight).

  8. #8
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    Why are you trying to drop weight in the first place?
    I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.

  9. #9
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    If I wanted to drop weight on this bike, or really just "enhance" it, I'd go: wheels + tires, then cranks, then rear shock Ti or just air. Fork might be too much to change?

    Later start looking at a new seatpost and saddle - may shave a couple of hundred grams.

    I'm with DHgnaR, though - why do you want to drop the weight? Do you want to ride up a lot?

  10. #10
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    Lighter Tires – Rotational weight is where you are going to see the most drastic increase on the trail. Your tires are the farthest away from the axle, so they provide the biggest return outside of rim choice. By saving a hundred grams at the tire, it takes less effort to get things rolling and keep them rolling.

    Go Tubeless – By dumping cheap, heavy tubes and converting to a tubeless setup, you can drop a couple of precious grams of rotational weight while decreasing rolling resistance at the same time…given that your wheels are tubeless compatible (most are now days via some kind of strip system). When this is combined with the lighter tires, it is even more of a drastic effect.

    Used Suspension Fork – New suspension forks are extremely expensive. However, the used market is a great option if your mountain bike has a heavy, boat anchor fork attached to it. You don’t need the latest and greatest, just a solid fork that will get you down the trail. Just be sure to get a fork with the recommended travel for your frame.

    Lose Some Weight– You and your bike are a package deal. The cheapest and most efficient way to lose bike weight is to lose the pounds off your mid section.


    3 Places Not To Spend Money On Weight Reduction

    Rear Derailleur - You are not going to notice a bit of difference by upgrading to a $250+ rear derailleur. You might get a little bit more attention at the trail head, but hat money could have gone to wheels or suspension for an actual weight decrease and better trail experience.

    Saddle – Unless you are a true xc racer or have the extra change just laying around, the difference in price for the same saddle with chromo rails vs ti does not add up. The 3 figure difference in some cases can be better spent where it matters.

    Your handlebars- these are your main contact area on the bike plus where you steer the bike. Stick with what is comfortable and reliable.

    The Biggest Change (But not cheap…)

    A High Quality Wheelset – Your biggest performance gains and weight savings that can be felt on the trail are going to come from your wheelset. All of your power goes to getting them moving and keeping them moving while you ride. The also just happen to be the largest mass on your bike outside of the frame. Unfortunately, you are also jumping into the $500+ price range.

    Another great place to move to an air shock but I would speak to Turner about this as I suspect their is a reason they do not offer this bike with an Air shock.

    Weight savings becomes an obsession and competition for many riders. When you are looking to shave the grams on your bike, remember to make changes where they count the most first and do it efficiently for your budget.
    Last edited by daisycutter; 01-18-2013 at 03:16 AM.

  11. #11
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    I just moved from a Marz 888 to a Boxxer WC (-1.5lbs) and from a combo Deemax front/823 rear wheelset to a set of Easton Havoc UST 150mm wheels (-1lb) on my Intense 951 plus a few other small tweaks... the weight was a respectable 36.9lbs before, now its down in the 34lb range... I would say fork and wheels are the best but most expensive places to drop some weight...and rear shock if you are running a coil... CCDB Air saved me about 1 lb..

    Least expensive would be tires... I'm running Schwalbe Muddy Mary 2.35 FR versions... 900 grams a tire... tubeless as well with some Stans. These are light but have proven durable over a season of abuse.
    Last edited by gretch; 01-18-2013 at 08:54 AM.

  12. #12
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    After getting the CCDB air for my DHR early this year I have become irrationally addicted on reducing weight on the bike and have gotten it down to approximately 36lb on my bathroom scale.

    I am out of town right now but here are the specs on my size M DHR off my head for comparison:

    Frame: Medium DHR
    Fork: 2012 Manitou Dorado Pro
    Shock: CCDB air
    Handlebar: Enve 800mm uncut
    Stem: 2011 Twenty6 F1
    Shifter/Derailleur: Saint 9 spd
    Cassette: XT 11-32
    Chain guide: E13 LG+1
    Chain: XTR 9 speed
    Cranks/BB: X0 carbon + hope ceramic BB
    Pedals: Point1 Podium
    Brakes: 2013 Saint with Goodridge hoses
    Wheels: 2011 Deemax (silver) on 2.5 UST Minion (I have tacoed the front wheel and running on a spare)
    Headset: Cane Creek (model unknown)
    Grips: ODI TLD
    Saddle: Tioga Spyder D
    Seat post: Thomson Masterpiece

    Got some kings hub on a deal before my trip and had them laced to a pair of spank spike evo 28 rims. Also got myself a pair of 2.5 EXO Minions that I am going to give a try on.

    Out of sheer boredom from my trip I have went online and order some additional parts. Got myself a whole new saint 10 speed drivetrain (so that I could use a 10 speed road cassette with 28 teeth), a sram red 11-28 road cassette and KMC SL chain.

    I think the wheels should save me a few hundred grams and the 1.5 ply tires should save me close to 1lb if I can get them to run ghetto tubeless. The drivetrain should save me another 200 grams.

    I am hoping that I will be able to get my bike down to 34lb when I get home from my trip but I am a little worried about the 1.5 ply tires not being able to take the abuse.

  13. #13
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    i just replaced my wheelset with Hope Pro2 EVO's on Mavic EX721's laced with sapim Race spokes with brass nipples..

    front 20mm weighed 950 grams
    rear 135mm converted to 10mm thru axle weighed 1,070 grams

    2,020 total... i was happy with that..

    the Transition Revolution 32's that I replaced weighed 2,370 grams
    and probably similar weight to the Azonics

  14. #14
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    Mgv101,
    Those sound like some nice upgrades. I would suggest you pay attention to the cassette as it will not shed mud due to how it is made.

    Eric

  15. #15
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    Use HOPE hubs and a 500 GARM Mavic hoop. Screw tubeless this is what we are going with next year at 69 GRAMS a tube its at least 200-300 grams lighter than tubeless.....

    http://www.eclipse.ch/new/Tubes.html

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianjenn View Post
    Use HOPE hubs and a 500 GARM Mavic hoop. Screw tubeless this is what we are going with next year at 69 GRAMS a tube its at least 200-300 grams lighter than tubeless.....

    http://www.eclipse.ch/new/Tubes.html
    Very interesting... I've been getting a little tired of tubless, as the seasons change it's kind of a pain to keep up with 5 wheelsets.
    Go out and ride your bike


  17. #17
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    Dhgnar - It was at 38lbs but jumped to 39.6 when i put my pedals and Goodridge brake lines on. Not too sure how accurate my scale is though, i dont imagine brake lines and pedals alone can add 1.5lbs but who knows. i would just like to get it to where it once was, maybe a little lower. I dont use it to pedal uphill or anything, we always hike-a-bike or shuttle. The trails/land out here are pretty flat, not much elevation so less weight could only be a benefit.

    Id like to keep my fork and shock, i would definitely like to get a ti spring for both. i think the ti springs combined with a new wheelset could drop some significant weight.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by eurotrash666 View Post
    Very interesting... I've been getting a little tired of tubless, as the seasons change it's kind of a pain to keep up with 5 wheelsets.
    Looks like the importer is back east. Will have to email and see what they cost. At 70GRM and supposedly very hard to puncture they may be WICKED.

  19. #19
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    ya but at about 65.00 for each tube, that starts to get expensive.
    Figure 3 tubes and a patch kit - you be looking at a big pile o cabbage.

    Been watching this for a few years now, and when the price comes down to something reasonable, like 15-20 each, then I may consider, ie if I could get 3 and a patch kit for 50, then I would probably give them a try....

    michael
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianjenn View Post
    Use HOPE hubs and a 500 GARM Mavic hoop. Screw tubeless this is what we are going with next year at 69 GRAMS a tube its at least 200-300 grams lighter than tubeless.....

    http://www.eclipse.ch/new/Tubes.html
    non tubeless rim :

    EX 721 Disc - rims - mountain bike - Mavic

    Tubeless rim :

    EX 823 Disc - rims - mountain bike - Mavic

    According to my calculation that's a 65gr difference . . .not 200-300gr. and in case you are new in town, you can run a regular tire on a tubeless rim just so you know

    but if you like to buy some fancy tube at 65$ a pop that you could STILL puncture AND are extremely hard to come by well, go ahead...I'll stick with my tubeless setup.

    To the OP : wheels should be the only thing worth spending money on IMO.Shedding weight anywhere else on the bike would only make a marginal difference on how the bike handles...That said , dont buy lightweight rims if you're planning on using them all the time but DO buy light rims for race days ;-) . . .I personally wouldnt run anything other than 823's, anything else gets trashed real quick around where I live.If you have the money for it,Deemax are light and solid. I ran a set for 3 seasons and just couldnt kill the damn wheels...surprisingly UBER strong for the weight

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuumbaq View Post
    non tubeless rim :

    EX 721 Disc - rims - mountain bike - Mavic

    Tubeless rim :

    EX 823 Disc - rims - mountain bike - Mavic

    According to my calculation that's a 65gr difference . . .not 200-300gr. and in case you are new in town, you can run a regular tire on a tubeless rim just so you know

    but you are forgetting the nipple inserts required on the 823 which brings the rim weight upto about 720 grams each....now we are talking a big difference....

    michael
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mykel View Post
    but you are forgetting the nipple inserts required on the 823 which brings the rim weight upto about 720 grams each....now we are talking a big difference....

    michael
    Critical mass, right there! I like the 821 for 2.25" tires, it is a good rim. But the double-threaded nipples add up, so apples-to-apples it is not. 720g isn't the right number, they easily build into a 1600g wheelset, but a modern DH/FR/slope bike needs wider rims to take full advantage of the tire carcasses available. There are many routes to a 1800-2000g wheelset, one compromise I would not make is channel width.
    Go out and ride your bike


  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuumbaq View Post
    non tubeless rim :

    EX 721 Disc - rims - mountain bike - Mavic

    Tubeless rim :

    EX 823 Disc - rims - mountain bike - Mavic

    According to my calculation that's a 65gr difference . . .not 200-300gr. and in case you are new in town, you can run a regular tire on a tubeless rim just so you know

    but if you like to buy some fancy tube at 65$ a pop that you could STILL puncture AND are extremely hard to come by well, go ahead...I'll stick with my tubeless setup.

    To the OP : wheels should be the only thing worth spending money on IMO.Shedding weight anywhere else on the bike would only make a marginal difference on how the bike handles...That said , dont buy lightweight rims if you're planning on using them all the time but DO buy light rims for race days ;-) . . .I personally wouldnt run anything other than 823's, anything else gets trashed real quick around where I live.If you have the money for it,Deemax are light and solid. I ran a set for 3 seasons and just couldnt kill the damn wheels...surprisingly UBER strong for the weight
    The conversion kit from STANS are about 300 grams....... plus what 60GRAMS of liquid per wheel..... it all adds up.

  24. #24
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    light wheels, id recomend sun add pros. after that just upgrade as needed.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by csermonet View Post
    Dhgnar - It was at 38lbs but jumped to 39.6 when i put my pedals and Goodridge brake lines on. Not too sure how accurate my scale is though, i dont imagine brake lines and pedals alone can add 1.5lbs but who knows. i would just like to get it to where it once was, maybe a little lower. I dont use it to pedal uphill or anything, we always hike-a-bike or shuttle. The trails/land out here are pretty flat, not much elevation so less weight could only be a benefit.

    Id like to keep my fork and shock, i would definitely like to get a ti spring for both. i think the ti springs combined with a new wheelset could drop some significant weight.

    you be surprised on pedal weight......look around for some lite pedals

    honestly depending on your weight (if you are a bigger guy then don't compromise stuff) be realistic what you ride the most....if it is smoother stuff and not as rocky go with way lite rims...I ride rocky stuff so it is Hadley and 823's...I love tubeless and been running it since 2004 with 823's. ...try the schwalbes....The Big Betty's are nice but turn the front tire backwards for better grip turning...they are real lite tires with insane low rolling resistance.

    Liter cranks....get the new saints if you are heavy...if not those X0 carbons are strong...have them on my Nomad....I know you don't like carbon but these seem good and I have lots of strikes on them....but if you are over 180lb don't get them.

    definately TI springs on both fork/shock

    I am running the I-beam seat and seat post...they are pretty lite

    run a lite road cassett and hollow point chain

    right there is 3 pounds easy
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

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