• 01-21-2013
    jasonjm
    I don't get it, whats the point of shaving weight on a DH bike? unless we talking 7 to 10 pounds.

    I can't feel any difference in weight on mine whether its at 38 lbs or 41 lbs, picking it up nor riding it downhill.

    Even pedaling the thing uphill I feel zero difference unless the new weight was just added to the wheels like very heavy tires.

    And its not like this thread is about shaving weight with the same performance components. There are suggestions of switching coil to air, lightweight (and weaker) rims, shittier tires, etc etc

    Makes no sense, why not just keep your DH bike and get another AM or FR bike at 30 lbs range?
  • 01-21-2013
    SV11
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jasonjm View Post
    I don't get it, whats the point of shaving weight on a DH bike? unless we talking 7 to 10 pounds.

    I can't feel any difference in weight on mine whether its at 38 lbs or 41 lbs, picking it up nor riding it downhill.

    Very true, you won't notice 2-3lbs of weight reduction, even though that 2-3lbs reduction would end up costing hundreds if not a grand or two, money not well spent.

    If you really want to notice the difference, train harder and hit the gym, will cost you less and get better results versus throwing money at a bike.
  • 01-21-2013
    eurotrash666
    Both of you have valid points... Light feels "lively," but skill and training trumps weight, hands down. Depends on the application and riding style, too. OP, you wanna expand on your motive?
  • 01-24-2013
    Le Duke
    Just because you can't feel the difference in weight doesn't mean your bike won't accelerate faster when you make it 5lbs lighter.

    That's like saying there is no difference in performance between a 300hp, 3000lb car, and that same car with the rear seats removed, no A/C, and other mods to make it 400lbs lighter.

    Physics isn't some made up myth, gentlemen.
  • 01-24-2013
    jasonjm
    I dunno man, when the rider like myself is 200+ lbs, not sure how much acceleration difference there is unless every single one of those 5 lbs is in the wheels.

    on the flip side, you could argue that the extra 5 lbs will hold momentum / speed better through the flat sections.

    on the double flip side you could argue the extra 5 lbs if mostly in the wheels, would help lower your center of gravity.
  • 01-24-2013
    SV11
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Just because you can't feel the difference in weight doesn't mean your bike won't accelerate faster when you make it 5lbs lighter..

    Thats true, when you get to 5lb and above you will notice a difference in weight and acceleration, but we were talking figures of around 2-3 which you won't notice as much, on a dh bike that is.
  • 01-24-2013
    csermonet
    I think miniscule amounts of weight loss make a beneficial difference in performace, even if not physically felt by the rider. Same principles as a car, only multiplied ten fold because the overall package is much much lighter
  • 01-25-2013
    Lelandjt
    You didn't mention what seat you're using. Depending what your have and how much size/padding you need you could drop up to 1/2lb for $50-$100. It's weiht that's far from the center of gravity so that's nice too. My priorities for weight loss are:
    1. Wheel weight, especially far from the axle
    2. Unsprung weight
    3. Stuff far from center (seat, post, handlebar, grips, stem)
    4. Stuff low and center (front triangle, crankset, shock spring)

    Dropping even just a couple pounds from the first 3 really makes a bike feel nicer and less tiring. Dropping weight from #4 will only be noticeable to lighter riders and once you're getting to that point you should also be considering the weight of whatever gear you wear. There's a big difference between different pads, helmets, ect.