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  1. #1
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    Getting into dh need help upgrading.

    So last weekend i went to local dh park rented a dh bike for half day and did the flowy part of the Mt. Creek
    the other half of the day i used my heckler at same trails just to compare.
    two things i notice first was my handle bars were shacking a lot more than the dh rig.
    second is that my rear was hopping all over the place.
    What do guys recomend for upgrades and or settings?

    so here my set up
    2012 heckler 6.2
    160mm fox Van 36 R (Green spring) im 220 with gear
    150mm float ctd. (air)
    tires navegal 2.2

  2. #2
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    buy a dh bike
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  3. #3
    Perpetual Hack
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    Bob is correct.

    You have done the test and know the difference.
    - and that was on the smooth flowie stuff - 'tiss a whole other world when you graduate to the gnar

    Couple things...

    Put some proper tires on and run them with the proper pressures - on the soft side - ie 25 lbs front and 28 rear +/- - you will have to experiment...this will help with small high-frequency bumps as well as give you some grip.
    When was the last time your suspension was serviced? Fresh makes a huge difference.
    As well, try to increase your SAG a few percent - and set sag in the attack position - not sitting.
    Speed up your rebound - chances are if you are normally trail running it will be too slow - this will have a similar feeling like too much rebound - but in this case you are moving fast enough for the suspension to not fully de-compress between hits - it is packing up.

    Other than change both fork and shock for something with a bit more capability you will have to tune and try.

    One thing - don't quit riding your heckler on the mountain - keep at it, it may beat you up a bit, but it will force you to pick better lines and ride lite - in other words it will teach you a huge amount because lack of bike forces you to get better as opposed to lean back and plow on a dh bike. If after wringing your current sled out a whole bunch, if you are still into it, look at picking up an end of season bike from one of the resorts. They tune them up and replace anything sketchy so can be a good cheap in.

    - and don't forget to get yourself a good full-face, goggles, and a minimum of knee and elbow pads.
    This is DH - it is not if, but when, and how hard you go down -so prepare yourself.

    Just a couple of thoughts - good luck, and have fun.

    michael
    A Dirtbag since 1969.
    A Knomer since 2007.

    Knolly Podium V.2
    Knolly Delirium
    Knolly Delirium-T
    RM Slayer . . .

  4. #4
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    The perception of shaking on the front of the heckler is likely the fact that the dh bike has more fork travel. It may also be that the fork on the heckler is set up too stiff for you, and it could need an oil change. A fork upgrade may improve things somewhat but as a 2012 van its a decent setup already and you probably just need good tuning.

    As for the rear it could again be the difference in travel, the spring preload could be too stiff for your weight, or the shock might need an oil change, or a combination. In addition high single pivots with a one piece rear triangle like the heckler are more prone to brake jack, a condition where braking tends to pre-compress and stiffen up rear suspension. You didn't mention which dh bike you rented but it is probably a better design not as prone to this.

    Your rear is also a decent float a couple years old, nothing wrong with it . So again its probably tuning or, just live with it, or, dh bike.

  5. #5
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    better fork coil shock or even a better air shock, and better tyres would make slight bit of differance, but a dh bike would be the best option.
    my brother colin, used to have a heckler, then swapped to a butcher, he rode both bikes in whistler bike park, with no troubble, only problem he had was a snapped pinch bolt on the rear swing arm, this was caused by hitting 5 ft drops. his set up was fox talas rc2 fork, elka stage 5 coil shock, minnion tyres, the bikes handled ok in the park, but soon found their limits on the more steeper techy trails, he also has a demo 8, and says its way more fun on that in the park,
    i have a knolly podium and endorphin, i took the endo into the bike park, and though it was fun and handled everything i threw at it, the podium is defo more fun and forgiving, so if at all possible if your finances allow, id look at going for a more dh specific bike....
    if your not in a situation that allows for another bike, then as i said before, tyres, shock, and maybe fork. either way remember whats most important, go out ride learn and have fun.

  6. #6
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    Wow thank you guys all great advice, i forgot to mention the rental was a demo 8 which rode like a cadilac.
    and yes i do plan on later on getting a dh after i graduate from this bike and by graduate i mean break it. but for the time being i will try the advice above next trip to the Mt. ill spend some time playing with settings.
    how do you recomend i do suspension settings? .... 1/2 turn at a time

  7. #7
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    Generally, DH bike suspensions are set up a bit on the softer side so that the full 8-10 inches of travel gets used more effectively.

    Increased sag 30-35% on preference so you are near the sweet spot in suspension ability while in turns and flow areas.
    High rebound so the wheels try to reach down to touch the dirt as you go over smaller stuff, and so they are at full extension before coming down out of the air, again trying to use as much travel as possible.
    Compression is a bit more personal, as it has to be slow enough to stop you from bottoming out on your biggest hits, but has to be fast enough to allow the suspension to work over rock gardens and roots.

    Trying to emulate these kinds of settings on a 5-6 inch trail bike is going to leave you with something that is either too stiff, or bottoms out on big hits. There just isn't enough travel to run everything the exact same without having to compromise somewhere.

    The rear end bouncing around is probably a combination of brake tension not letting the suspension work and the compression being too slow and not letting the suspension work, both of which will buck you around.

    Tires should be 2.35 at a minimum for most DH trails, and that's usually only for flowy, groomed stuff that won't batter your rims with rocks or roots. The more brutal the trail gets, the more you will want 2.5's for the extra volume to soak up some of it.

  8. #8
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    Update! so labor day i took a ride down to local bike park (Mt.Creek) and did the following:
    lower tire pressure from 45 psi to 35 psi.
    took 10 psi off rear shock giving it 35% sag
    and speed up rebound + 4 clicks, two clicks per ride down the mountain.
    and the bike felt a lot better this time, i felt like the rear suspension was actually doing its job, and the handlebars were not shaky, but were responsive to terrain .

    Thanks.
    mykel
    procter
    delirian
    petti the yeti

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJrookie View Post
    and yes i do plan on later on getting a dh after i graduate from this bike and by graduate i mean break it. e
    pushing a bike that is not intended for DH (graduate as you say) is not good....you can get hurt very bad from a frame failure....it is not worth it....get a used DH bike
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS View Post
    pushing a bike that is not intended for DH (graduate as you say) is not good....you can get hurt very bad from a frame failure....it is not worth it....get a used DH bike
    i'm not planing on pushing it to that extreme for now i'm sticking to beginner intermediate trails and no more than 4ft drops. i have experienced my first wipe out when i whent off a table top and forgot to straighten my handlebars before landing...lol thankfully i was wearing helmet,armor,knees and shin. with that and some common sense it should hold me over till 2015 when Yt industries starts distributing to good old U.S.A

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