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Thread: Enduro v. DH

  1. #1
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    Enduro v. DH

    So I relatively new into the world a downhill and enduro mtb racing/riding. Recently, I have been doing a lot of research on bikes and trying to decide on what to get when the time comes. I read somewhere on another forum about good beginner bikes and came across the German company, YT Industries YT Industries ? Home Now as I looked on their page I found two bikes that I was interested in, the YT Tues (gravity) and the YT Capra (enduro). As I am only 17 and don't have a lot of money naturally I want a bike that can do both. I would like to get into downhill racing professionally as well as maybe enduro. Would I be better off getting the Capra? Or should I just get the Tues and wait to get another bike somewhere down the road? Thanks

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    In my limited experience racing Enduro (but extensive experience racing DH), there is no bike that will do both disciplines well. I ride a 7" x 7", 35ish pound bike that is great on the descents, but not quite burly enough to be competitive on real DH racecourses -- I'd want at least an 8"-9" travel bike with a 64 degree head angle for racing.

    In an Enduro race, on the other hand, you need a bike that you can manage to climb on for 30+ miles/5000+ vertical feet in a day -- and it still needs to be very fast on descents. In the race I did, my bike was nice for all the real DH stages, but quite overkill (and too slow) for several of the stages that were more flat and XC-like. If I'd had to climb it for an additional stage, I think I'd have been VERY exhausted by the end of the day. Enduro races are getting more and more grueling every year, from what I've observed.

    If I was going to get a competitive Enduro bike, it would be no more than 30 pounds, have 6" of travel max, and probably no less than a 66 degree head angle. A bike like that would not stand a chance in true DH racing. It might not even be the best thing for the burlier descents -- but what I learned in a decade of XC racing is that you gain a lot more ground by having a light enough bike to go fast on the intermediate terrain rather than being 3 seconds faster than the next guy on the burlier stuff. For enduro racing, I'd ere on the side of a lighter, more efficient pedaling bike.
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    That YT Capra is about the raddest AM bike made. If you needed a bike to cover both areas I would go that route......

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    Cookie is right, you can't cover both Enduro an DH with one bike (effectively).

    I raced enduro last year, but did the opposite as he; I had an overbuilt XC bike, which did very well but still was not enough to pin it safely on the dh parts. Were I build another bike for Enduro, it would be similar, 5-6 inch travel and something that climbs/pedals very efficiently but with a slack head angle to keep it stable at highest speeds.

    If you're on the fence and can have only one, I'd go for the one you're going to use more. Whats close to you? shuttle trails, bike park, or trails you need to climb in order to descend....
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhazard View Post
    Cookie is right, you can't cover both Enduro an DH with one bike (effectively).
    You've never ridden a Canfield bike...

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    Ahh, yes. Another Holy Grail thread. This question, in its various forms, gets asked a lot. If you can find a used Canfield One, you'd have probably the closest thing to a DH-able bike that can still pedal well. They were just discontinued last year though, and they have a VERY loyal following. It may be hard to convince someone to let go of theirs. But it is the only 8" bike I can think of that truly does pedal like an AM/enduro bike. I take mine on multiple-hour long climbs all the time, and it destroys downhills like a nimble full DH bike. It's also the only bike in its class that I know of whose warranty will not be voided if you put a dual crown DH fork on it.

    On a similar note, Canfield replaced the One with a new 27.4 wheeled machine called the Balance. Although it isn't a dual crown, rampage-ready DH beast, it is a very capable descender. I'd put it up against the YT Capra (a very good bike, btw) any day of the week. I'd compare it to the new Santa Cruz Nomad in many respects. The Canfield brothers are former Rampage competitors themselves, and their bikes are built for VERY aggressive riding. Check them out, and read customers' reviews. You'll see how and why so many people love the brand.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRage43 View Post
    You've never ridden a Canfield bike...
    haha, you beat me to it! But it's so true.
    tangaroo: What electrolytes do chicken and turkey have again?
    rck18: All of them, because they're meat.

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    since your asking this, Im going to assume you dont really know much about gravity riding. I would suggest putting your hard earned cash towards an enduro rig because
    1. You can still ride it around normal hills/trails without much trouble. A DH bike you will be limited to hike/shuttle/uplift
    2. DH bikes are designed to be ridden at speed. Without developed skills/balls to ride with some velocity, they may feel awkward and unwieldy. An enduro bike will have a more familiar handling, and will allow to develop the skills to ride faster.
    3. You mention being competitive at racing. Unless you have some godly talent, during first races you will be your skill limiter, not the bike. While you can punt around a DH coarse on a enduro rig, I doubt doing an enduro race on a raked out dh sled would be much fun

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