Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    25

    Dual Slalom - Hardtail or short trave dually?

    Looking to get into some Dual slalom and 4X next year. Nothing majorly competitive or serious, but looking to have fun and give it my all.

    I did a heap of searching but can't really find what I'm after.

    I have a Norco 6 set up for light freeride, and a Carbon Rush setup for XC racing/enduros.


    I have the oportunity to buy a Jamis Parker or a Twofour Toy4, at an amazingly cheap price.

    I have all of the other components to put on the bike bar forks, so really just after a frame and am leaning towards the Twofour.


    Are these frames suitable?

    Or are there better options out there?

    Many TIA

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JohnJameson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    141
    I have a jamis parker that I use for ds. got it for crazy cheap, and have rode it hard for a year with no problems. currently set up with a Marz 4X and Fox rp23.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    462
    I'm not sure the exact reasoning behind it but it seems that the pros tend to go more short travel fulls for DS as opposed to the hardtail dominated 4x scene.

  4. #4
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: Lunchbox362's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    499
    Maybe for more pop off the jumps or some such...

  5. #5
    Stray Bullet
    Reputation: Nagaredama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    2,263
    Dual suspension certainly offers more traction especially during flat turns with some penalty in the acceleration department.

    4X riders almost always choose a hardtail because it is all about the snapping the 'gate' and getting to the first turn in front of everyone else.

    In DS you typically can't snap the gate so the hardtail doesn't really offer an advantage there and will definetly lack traction in flat loose turns.

    Out of all the Sea Otter's I've been to (5) the pro winner has always been on a full suspension bike. At the lower levels rider skill and fitness has way more to do with who wins than what type of bike someone is on.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    25
    Thanks heaps for the input all!

    It's muchly appreciated.

    I might go for the Parker then, as I can also use it for commuting and training with a quick wheel swap. Plus it will work out cheaper as I won't have to buy a BB converter and headset converter.

    WIN WIN! Cant' wait to start building it now. I've got pretty much everything that's been taken off my other bikes for upgrades. So this is what's most probably going to go on it.

    Wheels - DT Swiss 5.1D with Hope P2 hubs (off Norco)
    Cranks - '09 Stylo
    Bars - Holzfeller
    Cassette - Dura-ace 12-27
    Rear mech - XT long cage (waiting for a bargain short cage to show itself)
    Brakes - '09 XT
    Shifters - '09 XT
    Seatpost - Thomson

    I've got a 40T chainring, I suppose it's too hard a Q to answer if it's too big or not...?...

    Just need chain guide, forks, stem and headset. What ever comes across cheap is going to get the nod.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,633
    I have noticed most pros seem to run a 36t or 38t ring.

  8. #8
    Its got what plants crave
    Reputation: Jim311's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,936
    Is the Parker used? Be careful, they were known for having some breakage issues for a while, if I recall the seat stays were snapping due to a manufacturing or design defect.
    Ocala Mountain Bike Association - www.omba.org

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    25
    Looks like i've got to add a chain ring to the list... LOL

    The Parker is brand new.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    423
    Parkers design is good, the 2008s has some issues metal issues though. I plan try a DS race this year, see how I like it.

    Here is mine for an idea and how its spec'd
    - domain Uturn
    -answer 780 bars
    -easton havoc 50mm
    -wtb freeride rims (stock, but I see no reason to change them right now)
    -fox van RC rear
    -truvativ stylo oct 36/24
    -pg980 11-32

    Its mostly my do everthing bike. I trail ride mostly, but I also take it to the skatepark, dirt jumps, and did some DH this year. oh yeah, and it weights 35lbs. Not light, but for how its set up I cant really complain.


  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hozzerr1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    333
    I beg to differ, I believe that a hard tail for DS will give you the edge. DS contrary to 4X is not a race decided in the snap of the gate true, therefore you need something light, snappy, tight for turns and solid so you can stomp the pedals and turn yourself inside out on your way to the line. Thus a specific DS hard tail bike.

    If your decision is weighted by what the pros ride, well look at the Champ with the most wins Brian Lopes; in DS his specialty he always raced a HT.

    BTW, I got a DS Cortina 4130 for sale, check it out.

  12. #12
    eBiker
    Reputation: Mr.P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,088
    If you are racing Sport class then just run what you brung. The skill and fitness gaps at that level outweigh the bike differences.

    I ran a 6"x6" Enduro at Sea Otter and podiumed. The top 4 bikes in my Sport group included a Stump Jumper, a 7" bike with a double crown, my bike and a hardtail. The group started at more than 30 racers.

    The hard tail won, but he said his legs were destroyed by doing the fast drop, over and over again to reach the finals. He was much more skilled than I, tho, so he won.

    For expert class, the bike is much more important.

    For my bike, I only changed tires and had to cut down my seatpost so I could fully slam it. I'm a tweaker and thought I needed to fiddle with preloads & compression/rebound settings, but found I did better with them set at what I was most experienced with.

    BTW, I have an Enduro for sale! (joking.)

    P

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    25
    Totally hear what you're saying. I'm not going to be competing seriously. Just club stuff and the state series in a lower grade.

    The only problem is, I don't want to run the bikes I currently own as the XC bike, I feel isn't rugged enough to be thrashed over drops, cased into doubles (as I'm bound to do... lol) etc, and have to fork out the cost of repairs etc on a more delicate bike. So it's out. Then there's my light FR bike. It pedals like a fat ****! Great for doing what it's built for, but not much else. So considering I've got the majority of parts, I figure make up another bike that can not only take 4x and DS without a prob, but also serve as a training/commuting/do-all bike.

    Cheers

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •