View Poll Results: Running Clipless pedals on a DH bike...

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  • Yes, I ride them and like it!

    16 40.00%
  • Have ridden them...don't do it!

    4 10.00%
  • Haven't and wouldn't ever! you'll shoot your eye out!

    10 25.00%
  • Try it, you might like it.

    10 25.00%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
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    New question here. Clipless (CB Mallet) for DH riding?

    I seem to be riding more and more DH trails (Tahoe/Sierra region) with friends, and so I thought I'd stop renting and purchase something of my own.
    So, I recently picked up an older SC Bullit to do some gravity riding.

    Up until this point, have only been riding clipless on the rest of my personal bikes.
    Moving to platforms has been pretty easy, and seems to be the norm for DH bikes (all the DH bikes I've rented thus far only ever come with platforms obviously because they're rentals).

    Curious as to how many out there, if any, run clipless on a DH rig?
    Assuming, some do, but I just don't know about being attached to my bike going that fast downhill, dodging obstacles.

    My last outing, I noticed I unintentionally came off the pedals maybe twice while riding (once over a pretty big hit).
    Trying to weigh the risks of coming off a pedal, vs. being clipped to it and not being able to get off.

    I have a pair of mallets on another bike, so I may just try it one day...but won't bother if it seems to be a disadvantage.
    Last edited by pozzi; 05-25-2012 at 10:10 AM.

  2. #2
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    I'd say at least try it. Only you can make the decision if they're right for you. I personally only ride clipless anymore for every kind of riding from XC to DH. I used to run Straitlines with 5.10s but got sick of losing a foot on jump and drops. I prefer being connected to my bike a little more than flats offered. Since you ride clipless on your other bikes I assume you're able to unclip fairly well at least. I don't know how the Mallets are, but I can adjust the tension on my Shimano's and have them rather light. Do I still go down clipped in? Yes. However, I feel I have better control of the bike and have gotten used to unclipping where I really don't even think about getting out if I need to. There have been more times than not I feel I was able to pull of a tough section of trail because of the clipless that I wasn't able to do with the flats. It's all personal preference and you won't know unless you try. Think about this though, many of the world's top DH racers ride clipped in and they go way faster than either you or I can probably ever hope of going. I really like not losing a foot over roots and rocks or off jumps and drops. Hope this helps. If you're worried about being stuck to your bike, just hold yourself up on something and clip in and out like 100 or 200 times in a row real fast and you'll never really have to think about when the moment of truth presents itself.

  3. #3
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    I have ZERO experience with Mallets specifically, but I have ridden clipless for DH runs with shimano pedals.

    I started on flats for XC, the "graduated" to clipless. Continued clipless for years then got into DH. Like you I rented a DH bike first, so ran flat pedals. When I bought a bike I looked around at what the majority of people were riding, so I bought 5.10 Impacts and good flat pedals. I tried some shimano pedals with a platform cage (M647 I think) and didn't think they offered enough of an advantage to make the change permanent. In fact, I thought they were less fun. They did make me feel more secure in the roughest rock gardens, but less secure in corners and jumps. I ride for fun, not for a living.

    I now run flats on every bike I have that has suspension, so not my road bike.

    Your experience may differ from mine though, might be worth a try if you are worried about bouncing off pedals. Don't shoot down flats until you have tried 5.10's with nice flat pedals. Cheap pedals and running shoes are not a fair comparison.

  4. #4
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    thanks guys. been a while but been pretty happy with the platforms and a sticky pair of shoes (Vans BMX currently).

    buddy of mine that I ride with rides Mallets and he swears by them.
    after riding a lift-access park this weekend (Northstar) I'll have a better idea of what I'm going to stick with.
    Did pick up a pair of shin guards to prevent the pins from getting at my shins.

  5. #5
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    my answer isn't on the poll... i've ridden them and not against them. all depends on the trail. if there is a lot of peddling then yes! if more technical tight stuff i want flats
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  6. #6
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    5.10 + Canfield Crampon flats.

    Just like being clipped in.

  7. #7
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    Do what works

    It's not a popularity contest, it's about having fun. Fun means staying in control of the bike, whether it's road, cross, mtb, etc. If you are not confident in staying on the bike, use clips. Although I found current flats to provide an impressive amount of "connection", I did not feel comfortable at speed over bumps and jumps. Maybe I could gain that confidence over time, but I'm impatient, and I want to ride comfortably, not scared.

    Could be my riding style is wacked, too. After riding clips for many years, I depend on the ability to lift the bike from the pedals, without an angle requirement on the footbed. That gave me too much to think about on the flats- lift vertically with a horizontal foot on flats and the shoe and pedal separate, not good for me.

    Maybe when I have an excess amount of downhill time to kill, I'll work on it, but for now, I'll be the one in the xc race shoes on eggbeaters on my downhill bike, (and wearing the full body skinsuit stretched over pads).

    Moo

  8. #8
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    Last time I checked mallets were one of the worst pedals you could ever try for DH. Not sure if they've changed the designs though.

  9. #9
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    Yeah pretty much everything CB makes is garbage.

  10. #10
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    I ride clipped in with 5.10's and atomlab quickstep pedals, which I'm pretty sure are no longer being produced. I like being clipped in because every now and then I'll mess up a jump & the bike will drift away slightly. The atomlab pedals work well even if you're not clipped in. Also, I find that I'll occasionally misplace a foot on the pedal with flats, or it gets misplaced by bumps - and my mind isn't focused 100% on the ride. Bad things can happen when you're not focused.

    BTW: I know flats work for most people & am not suggesting that my approach is better, clipless just works better for me at this point in time. That might change when I learn to go bigger. Who knows?

    I try to avoid CB stuff too. Well, I like their microtools.
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  11. #11
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    Don't buy CB. I've never seen so many snapped spindles in my life. Shimano DX's for the win.

    In terms of clipless for DH... do it. Vastly superior to flats and 5.10s in rough terrain. Rode flats for the first 5 years I rode dh, tried clipless, and will never go back.

    Flats used to be the best when Sam Hill was dominating, now clipless is the best because Aaron Gwin rules the circuit now. Haha.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwinn8 View Post
    my answer isn't on the poll... i've ridden them and not against them. all depends on the trail. if there is a lot of peddling then yes! if more technical tight stuff i want flats
    Ding, ding, ding.
    And the winner is...

    I'm on the other side from most. I'm learning to ride platforms and it might be harder than learning clipless was.
    I've spent 15 years developing a good round pedal stroke and now I have to learn to stop pulling up on the back stroke. Most of my pedal pin scars are on my calves, not my shins.
    I also have far better bike control in the air and in technical stuff with clipless.
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  13. #13
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    hahah, I came from riding toe clips on my track to flats... it's a constant battle.

    My opinion is that clipless pedals are better if you can stay on your bike from the top of the mountain to the bottom. If you can't then flats help you bail. Plus the occasional superman.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Cow View Post
    It's not a popularity contest, it's about having fun. Fun means staying in control of the bike, whether it's road, cross, mtb, etc. If you are not confident in staying on the bike, use clips. Although I found current flats to provide an impressive amount of "connection", I did not feel comfortable at speed over bumps and jumps. Maybe I could gain that confidence over time, but I'm impatient, and I want to ride comfortably, not scared.

    Could be my riding style is wacked, too. After riding clips for many years, I depend on the ability to lift the bike from the pedals, without an angle requirement on the footbed. That gave me too much to think about on the flats- lift vertically with a horizontal foot on flats and the shoe and pedal separate, not good for me.

    Maybe when I have an excess amount of downhill time to kill, I'll work on it, but for now, I'll be the one in the xc race shoes on eggbeaters on my downhill bike, (and wearing the full body skinsuit stretched over pads).

    Moo
    What Moo said....

    And if you do decide to go clipless, mallets work fine. I've hade three pair on two different bikes over the past 6 years and they have all held up well, give a more stable platform than regular xc pedals, and make you look "more DH gnar" (which is important because people would laugh if you showed up at the park on your DH bike in your 4Ti Eggbeaters and Sidis.)

    Keep in mind that anything that is a hybrid like the Mallet will have some compromises. It won't be as good a flat pedal as a nice flat pedal and it won't work as well as nice dedicated clipless pedal.
    Last edited by KRob; 08-08-2012 at 04:50 PM.

  15. #15
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    lol.

  16. #16
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    I carry both in the gear bag. If it's pedally, I pull out the mallets and really like them. If it's scary, fast and chunky, flats all the way. No need to commit to one type when you can have both
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  17. #17
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    I tend to do a lot of checking of terrain manually with my helmet and the bike following along, so flats for me.

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