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  1. #1
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    big riders i need input... coil vs air

    i am buying a fork and i am a big guy(240 with gear)...i need some real input from big riders on coil vs air...

    my questions are...

    life span which will last longer?

    maintenance what fork needs less?

    big hits..what takes them best?

    i am looking at the RockShox Totem 2-Step Air 425$ new on ebay and the RockShox Domain RC Suspension Fork Coil 405$ new on ebay..


    i can not buy a used fork because i need 10 inches of steerer tube
    Last edited by itstreky; 03-21-2012 at 11:56 AM. Reason: new info needed

  2. #2
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    This just means that you can only run a 203mm rotor with this fork and no adapter is required. The fork should be a good option for someone of your stature.

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  4. #4
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    thanks for the info gretch... fatcat i wish i could get that domain but i need at least 10 inches of steer tube to fit my 19.5 session.... when it comes to mtn bikes being tall SUX

  5. #5
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    bump...(need new info did not want to make new thread)

  6. #6
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    Coil will be better in terms of simplicity and durability (ie-less to go wrong). But you should know that coil forks still do require regular service intervals. A fox 40 requires 50 hour lower leg services even though it is a coil fork.
    The arsonist has oddly shaped feet!

  7. #7
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    well im not a rich guy im looking for somthing i can bolt on a forget about it

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by itstreky View Post
    well im not a rich guy im looking for somthing i can bolt on a forget about it
    any fork will need some maintenance, get a coil it's much easier to rebuild than an air fork. I have a 2 step totem that was converted to coil 3 years ago, I have not done a thing to it since besides ride the hell out of it. I get around 40+ days a year on it riding DH out of state (chicago is flat) and sending some urban/local small DH stuff.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by itstreky View Post
    well im not a rich guy im looking for somthing i can bolt on a forget about it

    I'd recommend the Domain then. It's still going to require regular maintenence but has simpler internals than the totem so in the end it will be less work.
    The arsonist has oddly shaped feet!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by his dudeness View Post
    I'd recommend the Domain then. It's still going to require regular maintenence but has simpler internals than the totem so in the end it will be less work.
    Domain for sure..
    I was 235 nekkid when I started riding and did not care for any of the air suspension I had.
    Bought a sxt with a Domain and it works great and is super easy to service..
    In fact I am still using it even now that I'm only 190.
    Still works like new..
    '10 SXT
    '10 Demo 8
    '09 Yeti DJ

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by itstreky View Post
    i am looking at the RockShox Totem 2-Step Air 425$
    Avoid 2-Step (or Dual Position) anything, regardless of weight they are unreliable and will make your riding time miserable.

    Coil forks for big guys every time, just remember to factor in a new spring in to your budget, the fork will have a medium as stock and you'll probably want a firm or X-firm. If you buy froma shop they can probably arrange the spring change at purchase so you can ride straight a way.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fix the Spade View Post
    Avoid 2-Step (or Dual Position) anything, regardless of weight they are unreliable and will make your riding time miserable.

    Coil forks for big guys every time, just remember to factor in a new spring in to your budget, the fork will have a medium as stock and you'll probably want a firm or X-firm. If you buy froma shop they can probably arrange the spring change at purchase so you can ride straight a way.
    This.

  13. #13
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    another vote for the coil domain rc. Its a great fork for the money, super easy to rebuild/service with minimal tools. Feels very progressive for a coil fork, and very supple at beginning of stroke. I have the 160 mm uturn version on my 6" bike, and the 180 mm on my blindside. I feel no need to "upgrade".
    '14 rocky mountain altitude, rally edition
    '11 transition blindside

  14. #14
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    i ordered the domain rc... $365 free shipping (180mm)

  15. #15
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    You mentioned you want to "bolt it on & forget it."

    You can learn alot about how to tweak your fork, especially a coil, by doing regular oil changes. Find out what weight of oil works for you and - most importantly, what oil level works for you. You can use the oil level to avoid bottom out in a coil fork & the change how progressive the travel is.

    Learn to tweak! Suspension is a finicky thing on a DH/FR bike. Also, the maintenance on most forks is so simple that its just silly to pay someone to do it for you.
    Check out my You Tube Channel

  16. #16
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    +1 on coil n oil, easier to maintain and *needs* less TLC - if only from my belief that without an air spring there's less high-pressure air seals to worry with.

    For easier general maintenance I think it's kind-of handy that most current forks (?) have discrete damper/spring cartridges vs outers, so dropping the lowers to clean/lube them and change the dust wipers does not necessarily imply a complete damper/spring service also.

    They still should be regularly serviced, but for my 25c the coil-n-oil is just less twitchy.

    Also, as an over 200# rider I find that the coil works better for me over all, both "trail" and "dh"

  17. #17
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    Thanks for the info, im a big guy too and I am in the market for a downhill rig. I will be keeping this info handy.

  18. #18
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    Bigger guys also need to be particularly aware of rear suspension leverage ratio ranges, I feel.

    My reasoning is that whether air- or coil-sprung, a higher leverage suspension will put more stress on the shock mount points and may make the damper tuning more important.

    My old bike was a Titus Quasi-Moto (5.9" of travel on a 2" stroke shock, for an overall ratio of 2.95:1, FSR style linkage).

    I can tell you from experience of trying different shocks over time (nice shop I had to work with) that

    - small air can shocks sucked badly (Fox DHX Air)
    - large air can shocks worked reasonably well ( Fox RP23 with big air can, Swinger 3-way, Marzocci TST-R Air) - I was particularly happy with the performance of the Marz Roco TST - very low PSI at same sag vs others, nice and supple
    - coil was better ( Fox Vanilla RC as stock with steel coil )
    - later gen coil was even better ( Marz Roco TST Coil )
    - PUSH tuned coil was waaaay best ( Marz Roco TST Coil )

    On *all* the shocks the rear shock eye reducer / DU bushing would wear out quickly (e.g. I rode 4-8 times a week, probably 50-150 miles of trail, during better times ). Switching to a 3-piece ( steel tube with alu spacers to keep shock centered ) or 2-piece BETD pretty much resolved this completely. The rear shock eye on my Quasi had a fairly significant range of motion (over 30 degrees) too which could have played in to this wear rate, dunno.

    cheers

  19. #19
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    INSTALLED!... had a shop do the race and starnut i did the rest... cant wait to ride it....

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