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  1. #1
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    New question here. any inventors out there?

    I work a 9-5 but eat, drink, and sleep mountain biking.
    I wish I could trade my cube for my LBS where I can sell and wrench bikes all day (and still maintain my bills).
    Anyway...I ALWAYS think that I can invent a gadget related to mountain biking that will make the experience more enjoyable, easier, etc

    I'm not talking about develping a new fork or better hub...

    I'm talking about little things like Lizard Skin chainstay protectors...lock on grips....portable first aide kit...quick link for chains...etc.

    Has anyone ever brought their idea(s) to life?

  2. #2
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    I'll sell you a portable first aid kit if you need one....

  3. #3
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    You aren't getting any of my secrets!
    Jk lots of ideas here, just haven't hit on that one to go all in with yet, but we can dream right

  4. #4
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    ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by Flystagg View Post
    You aren't getting any of my secrets!
    Jk lots of ideas here, just haven't hit on that one to go all in with yet, but we can dream right
    HA! Yeah!!
    I'm thinking of one over the last few days that really makes sense to me...I just need to figure out HOW to do it!

  5. #5
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    I'm smart. tell me!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gringostr View Post
    I'm smart. tell me!
    I's smrter. Tell me instead.

  7. #7
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    I have more time than The-One1

  8. #8
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    One I have been thinking of, a little plastic case that you can clip/zip tie on your your bars near the stem that holds a tube and a CO2 inflator, sell them by the lifts at whistler and make a fortune in a day!
    The only negative is making sure the weight is kept down, but in all it would be tidier than the duct tape solution most people use!

  9. #9
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    I have lots of inventions...

    In November of 2000, I came up withthe idea of moving the axle and bearings out of the pedal body and into the end of the crank ark, where they belong, in order to make a more energy efficient pedal, with lower weight, more ground clearance, lower center of gravity, larger and more durable bearings and a bearing shaft that is larger and therefore stronger and more durable than what is possible with a 9/16" threaded spindle.

    It took until Spring of 2007, until I partnered up with a machinist, to be able to actually build and test the first prototype of the FlyPaper Pedal, a mere 3.7 millimeters thin, yet strong enough for the Red Bull Rampage. I filed for a patent and thought that at Interbike, I would be able to liscense the design to a bigger company and make enough money to finance researching and developing several of my other designs; a clip-in version of my pedal, a road version, a revolutionary new crank and bottom bracket interface, regenerative brakes, a whole new concept of wheels and tires, and best of all, a real transmission that will be housed on the main frame of the bike, rather than bouncing around on the rear wheel, enclosed in an oil bath, operated with just one shifter, have a lower low gear, a higher high gear, and more closely and more evenly spaced gears in between than Shimano or Sram defailleur systems, while actually being more mechanically efficient at transferring power than a roller chain and derailleur system, and far more mechanically efficient than the meshing gears udes in internal hubs. Unfortunately, I was unable to get any of their engineers to see the light, despite the fact that there was considerable consumer interest in the FlyPaper Pedals.

    At that point, I decided to produce and market them myself. So, after a year of testing and a few minor refinements I produced and marketed the FlyPaper Pedals on my own, but the per unit cost of doing a relatively small production run in the US, versus doing a large production run with slave labor in the Orient, translated into a high retail price.

    And, although they are super strong, (No one has EVER bent or broken a single pedal body or bearing shaft on one of them!), they looked too fantastically thin to be strong enough to many people.

    Also, in order to fit bearings into the crank arm required us to use cranks with a relatively wide profile at the pedal end of the cranks. (Even our smaller bearing that we use on the back side of the crank arm is bigger in diameter than the total height of some cranks at that point!) So in other words, the only reason that we were even able to use the cranks that we used, was that they were somewhat big and clunky. Strong, yes, but heavy. Therefore, upgrading to my pedal design required many people to downgrade to a crankset that was not as sleek and light as their existing cranks. While my pedals were far lighter than any other pedals ever produced, the extra weight of the crank arms that we had to use often times added up to a net gain in overall weight for many folks.

    The combination of high cost, weight, and people's fear of how thin they look, has seriously limited our comercial success.

    I am currently working to produce a prototype of my crank and bottom bracket design, which, like my pedal design, should be cross-country, weight weenie light, yet Red Bull Rampage strong. I have also figured out numerous ways to improve upon my existing pedal design and will incorporate those improvements into a new prototype to go with my crank design.

    Unfortunately, even if my new crank, bottom bracket and pedal designs work as I am sure they will, the missing ingredient to the whole formula is access to either advanced production equipment, a partnership with a company that has such equipment, or enough working capital to purchase said equipment or to pay a bigger company to do a production run for me.

    I now see several companies coming out with various attempts to come as close to my design as possible, while still clinging to the wimpy 9/16" threaded spindle standard. To me, this seems as silly as trying to add rear suspension to existing hardtail frames, (Some ididot actually tried to market that "idea" for a short while, back around 1995 or 1996!), or trying to add disc brakes onto frames or forks that weren't manufactureed with mounts for the brake calipers. So far, every attempt that I have seen to create a thin pedal, while clinging to the old-school 9/16" interface, seems to be a huge compromise on strenght, performance or both, and some of the latest designs, I believe to actually be dangerous! Of course, that was what many people who didn't understand them first thought the FlyPaper Pedals, so I am open to the possibility that I may be wrong about this...

    Anyhow, I plan to forge ahead with my ideas, just as I did with the trails I built illegally on Gooseberry Mesa and elsewhere in the Zion area of Southwestern Utah, which were subsequently made official by the BLM; and just as I did with taking my idea of a freeride contest, and creating the Red Bull Rampage. (I was the one who first discovered the riding area that was used for the site of the 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2004 Red Bull Rampage, and I was the liason between Red Bull USA, and the BLM, and was actually the person who signed the permit for the first year's Rampage.)

    Sooner or later, I will succede with marketing my designs.

    Good luck with your ideas!
    If more people rode more bikes, more places, more often, the world would be a more better place!

  10. #10
    If you think you can
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    Wow bike Doc! You Damn man! Keep on keepin on. Don't let the man get you down. It will happen for you someday.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bike Doc View Post
    In November of 2000, I came up withthe idea of moving the axle and bearings out of the pedal body and into the end of the crank ark, where they belong, in order to make a more energy efficient pedal, with lower weight, more ground clearance, lower center of gravity, larger and more durable bearings and a bearing shaft that is larger and therefore stronger and more durable than what is possible with a 9/16" threaded spindle.

    It took until Spring of 2007, until I partnered up with a machinist, to be able to actually build and test the first prototype of the FlyPaper Pedal, a mere 3.7 millimeters thin, yet strong enough for the Red Bull Rampage. I filed for a patent and thought that at Interbike, I would be able to liscense the design to a bigger company and make enough money to finance researching and developing several of my other designs; a clip-in version of my pedal, a road version, a revolutionary new crank and bottom bracket interface, regenerative brakes, a whole new concept of wheels and tires, and best of all, a real transmission that will be housed on the main frame of the bike, rather than bouncing around on the rear wheel, enclosed in an oil bath, operated with just one shifter, have a lower low gear, a higher high gear, and more closely and more evenly spaced gears in between than Shimano or Sram defailleur systems, while actually being more mechanically efficient at transferring power than a roller chain and derailleur system, and far more mechanically efficient than the meshing gears udes in internal hubs. Unfortunately, I was unable to get any of their engineers to see the light, despite the fact that there was considerable consumer interest in the FlyPaper Pedals.

    At that point, I decided to produce and market them myself. So, after a year of testing and a few minor refinements I produced and marketed the FlyPaper Pedals on my own, but the per unit cost of doing a relatively small production run in the US, versus doing a large production run with slave labor in the Orient, translated into a high retail price.

    And, although they are super strong, (No one has EVER bent or broken a single pedal body or bearing shaft on one of them!), they looked too fantastically thin to be strong enough to many people.

    Also, in order to fit bearings into the crank arm required us to use cranks with a relatively wide profile at the pedal end of the cranks. (Even our smaller bearing that we use on the back side of the crank arm is bigger in diameter than the total height of some cranks at that point!) So in other words, the only reason that we were even able to use the cranks that we used, was that they were somewhat big and clunky. Strong, yes, but heavy. Therefore, upgrading to my pedal design required many people to downgrade to a crankset that was not as sleek and light as their existing cranks. While my pedals were far lighter than any other pedals ever produced, the extra weight of the crank arms that we had to use often times added up to a net gain in overall weight for many folks.

    The combination of high cost, weight, and people's fear of how thin they look, has seriously limited our comercial success.

    I am currently working to produce a prototype of my crank and bottom bracket design, which, like my pedal design, should be cross-country, weight weenie light, yet Red Bull Rampage strong. I have also figured out numerous ways to improve upon my existing pedal design and will incorporate those improvements into a new prototype to go with my crank design.

    Unfortunately, even if my new crank, bottom bracket and pedal designs work as I am sure they will, the missing ingredient to the whole formula is access to either advanced production equipment, a partnership with a company that has such equipment, or enough working capital to purchase said equipment or to pay a bigger company to do a production run for me.

    I now see several companies coming out with various attempts to come as close to my design as possible, while still clinging to the wimpy 9/16" threaded spindle standard. To me, this seems as silly as trying to add rear suspension to existing hardtail frames, (Some ididot actually tried to market that "idea" for a short while, back around 1995 or 1996!), or trying to add disc brakes onto frames or forks that weren't manufactureed with mounts for the brake calipers. So far, every attempt that I have seen to create a thin pedal, while clinging to the old-school 9/16" interface, seems to be a huge compromise on strenght, performance or both, and some of the latest designs, I believe to actually be dangerous! Of course, that was what many people who didn't understand them first thought the FlyPaper Pedals, so I am open to the possibility that I may be wrong about this...

    Anyhow, I plan to forge ahead with my ideas, just as I did with the trails I built illegally on Gooseberry Mesa and elsewhere in the Zion area of Southwestern Utah, which were subsequently made official by the BLM; and just as I did with taking my idea of a freeride contest, and creating the Red Bull Rampage. (I was the one who first discovered the riding area that was used for the site of the 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2004 Red Bull Rampage, and I was the liason between Red Bull USA, and the BLM, and was actually the person who signed the permit for the first year's Rampage.)

    Sooner or later, I will succede with marketing my designs.

    Good luck with your ideas!

    Thanks for sharing

  12. #12
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    A bit off topic, but thank you Bike Doc! I wonder where mountain biking would be now, if it weren't for the Red Bull Rampage.

  13. #13
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    Yeah, Bike Doc, thanks and good luck! We need new ideas to keep things moving. I know it is often an uphill battle (I've worked in two start-ups that didn't pan out).

  14. #14
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    I have lots of inventions...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bike Doc View Post

    Sooner or later, I will succede with marketing my designs.

    Good luck with your ideas!
    Dean, keep going against the grain! Eventually something will take off. I've resorted to garage projects, a few things in the works. I have no intent to market to a wide audience for the reasons you stated, and I'm not in it for the $. BTW, great article in BIKE.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bike Doc View Post
    In November of 2000, I came up withthe idea of moving the axle and bearings out of the pedal body and into the end of the crank ark, where they belong, in order to make a more energy efficient pedal, with lower weight, more ground clearance, lower center of gravity, larger and more durable bearings and a bearing shaft that is larger and therefore stronger and more durable than what is possible with a 9/16" threaded spindle.

    It took until Spring of 2007, until I partnered up with a machinist, to be able to actually build and test the first prototype of the FlyPaper Pedal, a mere 3.7 millimeters thin, yet strong enough for the Red Bull Rampage. I filed for a patent and thought that at Interbike, I would be able to liscense the design to a bigger company and make enough money to finance researching and developing several of my other designs; a clip-in version of my pedal, a road version, a revolutionary new crank and bottom bracket interface, regenerative brakes, a whole new concept of wheels and tires, and best of all, a real transmission that will be housed on the main frame of the bike, rather than bouncing around on the rear wheel, enclosed in an oil bath, operated with just one shifter, have a lower low gear, a higher high gear, and more closely and more evenly spaced gears in between than Shimano or Sram defailleur systems, while actually being more mechanically efficient at transferring power than a roller chain and derailleur system, and far more mechanically efficient than the meshing gears udes in internal hubs. Unfortunately, I was unable to get any of their engineers to see the light, despite the fact that there was considerable consumer interest in the FlyPaper Pedals.

    At that point, I decided to produce and market them myself. So, after a year of testing and a few minor refinements I produced and marketed the FlyPaper Pedals on my own, but the per unit cost of doing a relatively small production run in the US, versus doing a large production run with slave labor in the Orient, translated into a high retail price.

    And, although they are super strong, (No one has EVER bent or broken a single pedal body or bearing shaft on one of them!), they looked too fantastically thin to be strong enough to many people.

    Also, in order to fit bearings into the crank arm required us to use cranks with a relatively wide profile at the pedal end of the cranks. (Even our smaller bearing that we use on the back side of the crank arm is bigger in diameter than the total height of some cranks at that point!) So in other words, the only reason that we were even able to use the cranks that we used, was that they were somewhat big and clunky. Strong, yes, but heavy. Therefore, upgrading to my pedal design required many people to downgrade to a crankset that was not as sleek and light as their existing cranks. While my pedals were far lighter than any other pedals ever produced, the extra weight of the crank arms that we had to use often times added up to a net gain in overall weight for many folks.

    The combination of high cost, weight, and people's fear of how thin they look, has seriously limited our comercial success.

    I am currently working to produce a prototype of my crank and bottom bracket design, which, like my pedal design, should be cross-country, weight weenie light, yet Red Bull Rampage strong. I have also figured out numerous ways to improve upon my existing pedal design and will incorporate those improvements into a new prototype to go with my crank design.

    Unfortunately, even if my new crank, bottom bracket and pedal designs work as I am sure they will, the missing ingredient to the whole formula is access to either advanced production equipment, a partnership with a company that has such equipment, or enough working capital to purchase said equipment or to pay a bigger company to do a production run for me.

    I now see several companies coming out with various attempts to come as close to my design as possible, while still clinging to the wimpy 9/16" threaded spindle standard. To me, this seems as silly as trying to add rear suspension to existing hardtail frames, (Some ididot actually tried to market that "idea" for a short while, back around 1995 or 1996!), or trying to add disc brakes onto frames or forks that weren't manufactureed with mounts for the brake calipers. So far, every attempt that I have seen to create a thin pedal, while clinging to the old-school 9/16" interface, seems to be a huge compromise on strenght, performance or both, and some of the latest designs, I believe to actually be dangerous! Of course, that was what many people who didn't understand them first thought the FlyPaper Pedals, so I am open to the possibility that I may be wrong about this...

    Anyhow, I plan to forge ahead with my ideas, just as I did with the trails I built illegally on Gooseberry Mesa and elsewhere in the Zion area of Southwestern Utah, which were subsequently made official by the BLM; and just as I did with taking my idea of a freeride contest, and creating the Red Bull Rampage. (I was the one who first discovered the riding area that was used for the site of the 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2004 Red Bull Rampage, and I was the liason between Red Bull USA, and the BLM, and was actually the person who signed the permit for the first year's Rampage.)

    Sooner or later, I will succede with marketing my designs.

    Good luck with your ideas!
    Hi Dean,

    I hope you find commercial success with any of these ideas! You've created a game changing reality with the introduction of the uber thin pedal. That said I understand why the market hasn't responded to the requirement to go to a bigger and clunkier crank. It would so wonderful if you could find a way to put your pedal on a standard crank. You should, at least, feel vindicated at all the companies trying to produce a similar product.

    Thanks for all the innovation you've brought to our sport and I hope you're ultimately richly rewarded for it!

    Take care,

    Michael
    If you can't keep the rubber side down......at least smile for the camera!

  16. #16
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    You're on the right track. Hoping you make it!

  17. #17
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    this one is silly...but with the right marketing I can see how it could make some pocket $...

    mouthguards - maybe not so much for the DH crowd...but think about kids in skate parks wearing BMX helmets. Lot's of mom and dads freak because their kids are eating it from time to time, and dental bills can add up fast.

    Like I said, you can buy a mouth guard for football...but if you package it as a BMX mouth guard and include a pair of full finger gloves...etc..
    remember...taking an existing product and packaging it...then marketing it is easier than starting from scratch.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bike Doc View Post

    Sooner or later, I will succede with marketing my designs.

    Good luck with your ideas!
    hope you do, it's a great idea. i'm in the same boat but in the recycling biz.
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  19. #19
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    Bike Ideas

    Bike Doc,
    I think you have good ideas but you are trying to target a problem that doesnt really exist. Only a very small fraction of the cycling community have had issues with their pedals. For most people the current 9/16 "wimpy" spindle works just fine. As a result there is not enough people out there who believe you are solving a real problem because they have not seen it. Until you solve a problem that many people have your product wont sell. The same will be said about your cranks. Who will want to buy a crank that does not have the quality assurance of Shimano or SRAM. These companies put millions of dollars into producing cranks and have had great success. I, like most riders have not had issues with my cranks or pedals. You will find much greater success when you try to solve a problem that people actually have.

  20. #20
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    Bike Doc,
    I think you have good ideas but you are trying to target a problem that doesnt really exist. Only a very small fraction of the cycling community have had issues with their pedals. For most people the current 9/16 "wimpy" spindle works just fine. As a result there is not enough people out there who believe you are solving a real problem because they have not seen it. Until you solve a problem that many people have your product wont sell. The same will be said about your cranks. Who will want to buy a crank that does not have the quality assurance of Shimano or SRAM. These companies put millions of dollars into producing cranks and have had great success. I, like most riders have not had issues with my cranks or pedals. You will find much greater success when you try to solve a problem that people actually have.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by robg884 View Post
    Bike Doc,
    I think you have good ideas but you are trying to target a problem that doesnt really exist.....Until you solve a problem that many people have your product wont sell. ...You will find much greater success when you try to solve a problem that people actually have.
    I agree with all this, but then I remember all the annoying new standards on my new frame. Press fit BB, tapered fork, 142 rear spacing... frustrating. None of it was necessary, but yet here it sits. All it takes is a push from the industry big-wigs.

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