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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatMutt View Post
    When running DH, I'm wearing a full face helmet, body armor, knee pads, and 5Ten shoes, so I'm not overly concerned about a few ounces of shaved weight. I'm not racing, so its possible that this thin pedal craze isn't directed at me. Having smashed my pedals on rocks on several occasions, and being able to pedal away is excellent. Having them shatter, and stab me in the ankle, well that would suck pretty bad.
    I'll keep my thick, bombproof pedals.
    Hey Mr. Mutt,

    I agree with you regarding wearing full safety gear while riding DH and not being overly concerned about weight. I'm also not a racer and ride just for fun. However, weight savings would be at the bottom of the list when you tally up the advantages of thin pedals. There are many threads you can research that go into the subject. That said these are the two major advantages for me.

    1) Thinner pedals equal fewer rock strikes in the first place. Avoiding impact goes a long way to saving pedals, crashes, etc.
    2) The key benefit we’re missing from other traditionally mounted pedals is having the thickness of the platform well inside the diameter of the spindle. Certainly there are now a number of thin, light, large platform pedals but none, which I’m aware of, with this particular feature. If you've ever had the opportunity to ride a set of Fly Paper pedals you'll know the incredible benefit this feature provides.

    I currently have Canfield Crampons on three of my bikes and wouldn't go back to a thicker pedal. In my experience the degree of advantage to thin pedals is analogous to amount of advantage supplied by height adjustment seat posts.

    Good Riding,

    Michael
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  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatMutt View Post
    When running DH, I'm wearing a full face helmet, body armor, knee pads, and 5Ten shoes, so I'm not overly concerned about a few ounces of shaved weight. I'm not racing, so its possible that this thin pedal craze isn't directed at me. Having smashed my pedals on rocks on several occasions, and being able to pedal away is excellent. Having them shatter, and stab me in the ankle, well that would suck pretty bad.
    I'll keep my thick, bombproof pedals.
    Thin has nothing to do with weight... the major advantages are pedal clearance and moving your foot closer to the spindle. Maybe you should try before you make up your mind?

  3. #28
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    I would love them for XC! I can't tell you how many times I ride with guys clipped in and they wreck and can't get out in time. I ride flats now and love the fact that I can put my foot down without hesitation. Looking forward to how the style of flats will lower the chance of pedal roll and strikes. But for XC I want them to be sub 200grams. Really like the Canfield's but to heavy. This is a great time for anyone that rides flats, huge benefits to be reaped from the new technology.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelsnead View Post
    Hey Mr. Mutt,

    I agree with you regarding wearing full safety gear while riding DH and not being overly concerned about weight. I'm also not a racer and ride just for fun. However, weight savings would be at the bottom of the list when you tally up the advantages of thin pedals. There are many threads you can research that go into the subject. That said these are the two major advantages for me.

    1) Thinner pedals equal fewer rock strikes in the first place. Avoiding impact goes a long way to saving pedals, crashes, etc.
    2) The key benefit we’re missing from other traditionally mounted pedals is having the thickness of the platform well inside the diameter of the spindle. Certainly there are now a number of thin, light, large platform pedals but none, which I’m aware of, with this particular feature. If you've ever had the opportunity to ride a set of Fly Paper pedals you'll know the incredible benefit this feature provides.

    I currently have Canfield Crampons on three of my bikes and wouldn't go back to a thicker pedal. In my experience the degree of advantage to thin pedals is analogous to amount of advantage supplied by height adjustment seat posts.

    Good Riding,

    Michael
    I have not had the opportunity to ride the Fly Paper pedals, so I am coming at this from the standpoint of not having a lot of trust in something so thin, for what I would need them for.
    I have heard of the Canfield Crampons, and seen pics of them; are they as thin as the Fly Papers? They look to me, to be thicker. I certainly understand the benefits of having the thickness of the platform well inside the diameter of the spindle, and maybe one day I'll find a much thinner pedal than I'm running now, that I can have confidence in. But not with the added expense of replacing cranks.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatMutt View Post
    I have not had the opportunity to ride the Fly Paper pedals, so I am coming at this from the standpoint of not having a lot of trust in something so thin, for what I would need them for.
    I have heard of the Canfield Crampons, and seen pics of them; are they as thin as the Fly Papers? They look to me, to be thicker. I certainly understand the benefits of having the thickness of the platform well inside the diameter of the spindle, and maybe one day I'll find a much thinner pedal than I'm running now, that I can have confidence in. But not with the added expense of replacing cranks.
    Hi Mr. Mutt,

    The Crampons are dramatically thicker than the Fly Paper pedals as they're 6mm at the edge of the pedal and 17mm at the spindle. Therefore your foot sets on top of the spindle rather than inside the diameter of the spindle. If memory serves the Fly Paper is 3.9mm thick pretty much throughout the width of the pedal thereby putting your contact point well inside the diameter of the spindle. That said the Crampons are still a major advantage, IMHO, over other conventionally attached pedals due to how thin they are. So far they've also handled all the abuse I've been able to dish out.

    I agree with you that it's unacceptable to have to replace bottom bracket and cranks in order to gain the advantage provided by the Fly Paper pedals. However, I believe they did engineer the Fly Paper pedal to be strong enough to withstand the rigors of the application.

    All that brings us to this crop of new thin pedals that will debut at Interbike. If they can handle the durability issue then we'll have the best of all worlds with conventional mounting combined with contact point well inside the diameter of the spindle. Time will tell!

    Take care,

    Michael
    If you can't keep the rubber side down......at least smile for the camera!

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelsnead View Post
    Hi Mr. Mutt,

    The Crampons are dramatically thicker than the Fly Paper pedals as they're 6mm at the edge of the pedal and 17mm at the spindle. Therefore your foot sets on top of the spindle rather than inside the diameter of the spindle. If memory serves the Fly Paper is 3.9mm thick pretty much throughout the width of the pedal thereby putting your contact point well inside the diameter of the spindle. That said the Crampons are still a major advantage, IMHO, over other conventionally attached pedals due to how thin they are. So far they've also handled all the abuse I've been able to dish out.

    I agree with you that it's unacceptable to have to replace bottom bracket and cranks in order to gain the advantage provided by the Fly Paper pedals. However, I believe they did engineer the Fly Paper pedal to be strong enough to withstand the rigors of the application.

    All that brings us to this crop of new thin pedals that will debut at Interbike. If they can handle the durability issue then we'll have the best of all worlds with conventional mounting combined with contact point well inside the diameter of the spindle. Time will tell!

    Take care,

    Michael
    Well I'm certainly intrigued, especially since I'm running some Wellgo pedals from like four years ago, that are somewhere in the 28-30 mm range; possibly more. And yeah, Interbike should be pretty sweet.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by albeant View Post
    Here's another one that belongs on this thread Looks pretty decent, if not revolutionary:
    HT has some interesting looking pedals, but there is no U.S. availability & no direct order from HT (yet). The U. S. distributor listed on the HT website doesn't even show that item in their available product list, nor does it show on a search. Apparently HT is launching a direct order feature on its website, but no date yet.

  8. #33
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    Somebody is going to have to prove that these new designs actually hold up to riding...every man and his dog is now launching a model it appears...


  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman2058 View Post
    Somebody is going to have to prove that these new designs actually hold up to riding...every man and his dog is now launching a model it appears...

    Hey Mr. Iceman,

    Very cool looking! Any other info? Manufacturer, release dates, how thick, wide, costs, etc? Of course I agree with you 100% about the durability concern!!!

    Thanks for sharing,

    Michael
    If you can't keep the rubber side down......at least smile for the camera!

  10. #35
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    Tioga make these, apparently. Here's what little info the internet offers up...:

    http://www.bicycling.com/mountainbik...oga-zero-pedal

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman2058 View Post
    Somebody is going to have to prove that these new designs actually hold up to riding...every man and his dog is now launching a model it appears...

    Unless those pedals are made out of Adamantium, no way can those hold up.
    The material is just not thick enough to handle the force put on a dh pedal. I wouldnt ride those if you gave me a set for free.

  12. #37
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    Tioga Zero Pedal
    Flat pedals are getting thinner and thinner. The limiting factor, however, is the axle. So, Tioga eliminated the axle in its Zero pedal, which is still in development. Just 7mm at its thickest point, and a mere 4.5 at the thinnest, the Zero is fly-swatter thin. As you can imagine, the trickiest part is the bearing. Instead of having two bearings—one inboard and one outboard of the axle—the Zero uses just one, and doesn't have an axle at all. So every bit of force from a cased landing goes right into that single bearing. Still, Tioga says it's close to perfecting the design and the pedal should be available later this year.



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  13. #38
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    I don't understand why you'd release a picture of a pedal that you haven't perfected yet.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelsnead View Post
    Hey Folks,

    This horse race is getting hot! Now it looks like Specialized is in the game. I learned the following from Pinkbike: http://www.pinkbike.com/news/Special...pe-pedals.html

    “First off is the new Specialized flat pedal. The brainchild of FSR engineer Jason Chamberlain, the new pedal is a true 10mm thick at the spindle. Through the use of an ingenious, patented, bearing system at both ends, this slick new platform will be the absolute thinnest pedal on the market. Unlike other pedals that cheat and measure the outer edges, or have a huge lump your foot sits on, this one is concave, has a multitude of pin positions and undercut, adjustable custom pins. When hit, they will break off at the base and still be easily removed, unlike a set screw.”
    Attachment 617445

    Man…am I looking forward to this year’s Interbike where I believe we’ll all learn who actually has one of these in production?

    Take care,

    Michael
    Hey Folks,

    Here is the latest update on the Specialized effort in this horse race! It's starting to look very real!!

    http://www.pinkbike.com/news/Special...Crankworx.html

    Enjoy,

    Michael
    If you can't keep the rubber side down......at least smile for the camera!

  15. #40
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    Tioga Releases Super Thin Concave Pedal

    Quote Originally Posted by Internal14 View Post
    Tioga Zero Pedal....Pipe dreams....
    Hey Folks,

    It looks like they've released this pipe dream:

    Tioga Releases Super Thin Concave Pedal
    Measuring a mere 7mm thin and 4mm at the thinnest, Tiogas MT-ZERO is the thinnest concave pedal on the market.


    http://networkedblogs.com/lpdWt

    Here's the scoop from Tioga:

    “The breakthrough is made possible by Tioga’s ZEROaxle bearing system,” said Kai Cheng, Tioga’s global marketing manager. “With conventional pedals, the body must be tall enough to contain the axle and bearings that are within its body. The ZEROaxle system in the MT-ZERO removes this restriction by redirecting its axle and bearing away from the body, allowing for an incredibly thin profile.”

    The leading-edge concept starts with the ZEROaxle bolt assembly which houses an outboard sealed cartridge bearing, precision machine-pressed into the bolt, to facilitate the pedal’s rotation. With the absence of the traditional axle or multiple bearings within the body of a ZEROaxle pedal, a special outboard bearing is equipped to handle the redirected load converging into a smaller area. Whereas typical pedal bearings are 13mm in diameter, ZEROaxle’s cartridge bearing is more than twice the size and capable of handling over five times the dynamic load of typical bearings - ZEROaxle bolts have been thoroughly tested to meet the Japan Industrial Standards (JIS) for pedal bearings.

    The result is a pedal system with an entirely new form factor made possible by the ZEROaxle bolt.

    A thin pedal profile positively affects ground clearance, foot stability, and pedaling efficiency; the thinner the body, the more positive these effects.

    With new design freedom provided by the ZEROaxle bearing system, the MT-ZERO’s body is impressively thin at 7mm, and because the body platform is a dual concave design, which better adapts to the contours of the foot, it dips down to just 4mm in the center.

    Although the MT-ZERO body is extremely thin and open, it’s neither flimsy nor fragile. The MT-ZERO’s body is a solid one-piece construction, investment-cast from chromoly steel, and tested to handle a wide spectrum of off-road applications from XC to all-mountain.

    Fully Compatible with Standard Cranksets

    The ZEROaxle MT-ZERO’s 9/16” thread makes it fully compatible with standard cranksets.

    Additionally, when designing the ZEROaxle pedal system, Tioga engineers were mindful not to disrupt the rider’s biomechanics. Width of the ZEROaxle bolt is comparable to the axle bolt on conventional platform pedals that upgrading to the MT-ZERO will have little impact on the user’s Q-factor, the distance between a rider’s left and right foot, measured through the bottom bracket.

    Maintenance Free, Modular Design

    The ZEROaxle pedal system is modular and designed to be virtually maintenance free. Should the bearing wear down, simply replace the ZEROaxle bolt. The same applies to the body. Replacement ZEROaxle bolt and MT-ZERO body are available individually, in left or right configurations. Its modular design will also allow users to easily switch different body designs from any current and future ZEROaxle pedals.

    Pricing and Availability

    The ZEROaxle MT-ZERO will be available within the next 60 days through professional, independent bicycle dealers nationwide. The pedals will be available in black, white or silver, for a suggested retail price of US$99.

    For more info, go to Tioga USA.


    So we need someone to TOFTT and get back to us as soon as possible with ride / destruction report!

    Take care,

    Michael
    If you can't keep the rubber side down......at least smile for the camera!

  16. #41
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    ZEROaxle bolts have been thoroughly tested to meet the Japan Industrial Standards (JIS) for pedal bearings.
    The Japanese have an industrial standard for pedal bearings?

    I would like to know more.

  17. #42
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    I'll bet that soon some manufacturer will introduce crank arms with integrated pedal bearings... won't take long.
    I love the smell of the TF2 chain lube in the morning.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by miqu View Post
    I'll bet that soon some manufacturer will introduce crank arms with integrated pedal bearings... won't take long.
    Hi miqu,

    I find your comment interesting since that was the design on the Fly Paper pedal. He machined out the crank arm and installed an inboard and outboard bearing. However it required a crank arm of a certain dimension to accommodate the installation of the bearings. Only one set of cranks was big enough and to use and it required you to replace the bottom bracket as well. Bottom line was changing your pedals cost approximately $600 and necessitated the install of a crank set and bottom bracket you didn't want.

    I got to ride them and IMHO the pedal was superior to anything on the market now but the cost and additional required parts caused me not to buy them. However his design was more than strong enough for the application.

    We'll have to see if this latest generation of pedals thinner than the diameter of the spindle is strong enough for the application. Time will tell!

    Take care,

    Michael
    If you can't keep the rubber side down......at least smile for the camera!

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelsnead View Post
    Hey Folks,

    Here is the latest update on the Specialized effort in this horse race! It's starting to look very real!!

    Specialized Prototype Pedals - Pinkbike.com

    Enjoy,

    Michael
    Dem shitz look very sweet...but very expensive. If speshy has abandoned the Flypaper design for the Canfield...and their DH racers are using it, it sort of vindicates the extreme approach of the Flypaper. I am guessing that none of the axle-less designs on this thread will stand up to real world abuse.
    Responds to gravity

  20. #45
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    Vindicates?

  21. #46
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    Super thin Single bearing pedal designs will not hold up. I have spent a lot of time on one of them, and as great as the pedals feel and as grippy as they are, I am back to my good old fashioned Kona Wah Wahs.
    The bearings on these just don't hold up, play develops, tons of drag is created. I felt like I had a power boost when I slapped the smooth dual bearing Kona's back on, thats how bad the drag was.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by morandi View Post
    Super thin Single bearing pedal designs will not hold up. I have spent a lot of time on one of them, and as great as the pedals feel and as grippy as they are, I am back to my good old fashioned Kona Wah Wahs.
    The bearings on these just don't hold up, play develops, tons of drag is created. I felt like I had a power boost when I slapped the smooth dual bearing Kona's back on, thats how bad the drag was.
    Hi Mr. morandi,

    Do you care to share which "Super thin Single bearing pedal" you had this experience with? And was it a production model or a prototype?

    Thanks,

    Michael
    If you can't keep the rubber side down......at least smile for the camera!

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by NWS View Post
    Vindicates?
    Yes, vindicates.
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  24. #49
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    Seriously guys, I'm all for a good set of pedals... but really. Is it really nessecary to have a pedal as thing as the OP posted? Is there a point? Or is it just something for you guys to talk about?

  25. #50
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    With the thinner pedals I have there is definitely a more locked in/controlled feeling. Great in the corners and more lift when bunnyhopping stuff/jumping. I notice a difference (not dramatic) between a 17mm pedals and the thin 11mm I have. It could also be a result of pedal shape/pin placement.
    Now, somebody needs to come out with a thin pedal whos bearings feel as smooth as my Kona Wah Wahs.

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