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  1. #1
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    2008 Demo 7 II + telescoping seatpost for trail riding?

    Guys,

    I am taking a look at the 2008 Demo 7 II, which is the high end build and comes out to 40lbs on the shop scale. I know this is not a trail bike but I trail ride with my Bottlerocket every week and it is sitting at 38lbs. Is this bike going to feel much worse for trailriding than the Rocket because of the slacker geometry? Has anyone used a telescoping seatpost on this bike and if so what brand? I don't want to spend more cash on a $200+ high end seat post either. Thanks.

  2. #2
    fdp for life
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    I have a 07 demo 7 I and I have two separate seats and seatposts. I use the stock enduro seat and syncros post for freeriding/shuttling and a wtb pure v seat and a longer thomson post for some easier pedaling on easy to medium intensity trail rides. For a little more range you could add a dual ring crank and a front derailluer and flip the shock mount for a higher bottom bracket and a little steeper head angle.

    Make no mistake about the demo it is a bike that is built to be ridden hard down hill with little pedalling. Anyhow if you like ripping down hill more than trying to be a mountain goat you will be pleased with it's performance.

    Good luck with your decision.

  3. #3
    Capricious youth...
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    Specialized will have their own telescoping seat post out soon.

    Get that one. It's the nicest that I've seen so far.
    Meh.

  4. #4
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    I own a Demo 8 and I've had seat time on a Demo 7, and under no circumstances would I want to be pedaling either bike a considerable distance. I've got an SX Trail for the times that I do need to pedal somewhere.

    Weight isn't your concern here, it's the geometry. To answer your question: Yes, a Demo 7 will feel very significantly worse for trail riding than a Bottlerocket. My understanding is that the bottlerocket is a fairly stiff bike, whereas the Demo is built to be very plush.

    You might want to take a look at the SX Trail.

  5. #5
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    I have 2 rings and 2 seatposts. Works out well when I need to pedal to get to the top of something. But it's basically a DH sled.

  6. #6
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    depends on how far you want to pedal it,might be that im unfit but its a pig of a bike to pedal,anything more than 20 kilometers.

  7. #7
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    Meh, I'm lazy and I can pedal my Demo almost anywhere. She climbs like a marshmallow but if you've got the cajones for it you'll be fine. It'll only make you stronger.

  8. #8
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    I'm not sure why you would buy a Demo 7 for trail-riding purposes; its way too much bike for just trail riding.

    Why not get something like a Reign X? The Reign X is sort of like a cross between a AM and FR bike that can be built lightweight and can handle a lot of different stuff you throw at it. Pedals good, doesn't weigh to much, rips up trails.
    [size=3]Northstar 2008 Riding Crew[/size]

  9. #9
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    +1 for the looking at other options opinion.

    It's like using a hammer to put in a screw. It might work, but things would go a whole lot smoother if the right tool were used.

    Look at finding an 08 SX trail - best FR/heavy duty AM bike ever IMO - still some deals to be found.
    Or Reign X for a lighter (?) build - air shocks instead of coil for the higher end models, but pedal well, and with a low bb, shred the down.
    What i ride:
    2012 Norco Aurum LE custom
    2011 Cannondale Jekyll carbon

  10. #10
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    I don't know why some people are so opposed to pedaling DH bikes....I'm a big fan of shuttling and resorts, and most of the trails I ride (and especially the way I ride them) requires a big bike, but sometimes you gotta pedal up.

  11. #11
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    I didn't qualify this in the first post, but I have been riding the Rocket in Whistler the past few years and I would like more of a DH bike for shuttling/park riding. However, it is going to be hard for me to buy a Demo and justify keeping the Brocket. I also have an '02 Chameleon hardtail with a pike that I could use for most of the trails we ride here in Socal and then occaisionally trail ride the Demo. Can the Demo be used comfortably as an occaissional trail bike at least?

  12. #12
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    Sounds like you won't let this go till.....

    Someone says Yes, so.......YES.

  13. #13
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    sound like a awsomely great idea, mabe you can enter some xc races with it too

    I think some better options would be a Knolly delirium, canfield one, maybe somthing from intense, or even an ellsworth rogue, which all get good marks for petalability.

  14. #14
    maker of trail
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    you won't win any xc races but there is no reason why you can't pedal it. I ride my session 77 every where and do ok, the HA makes it a bit difficult to ride up tight steep switch backs, but I don't care for that anyway.

    The 7" of travel gives you gob loads of traction once you get strong enough to pedal it up hill

  15. #15
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    If you're thinking 90% downhill, 10% pedaling, then I suppose you'd be fine. Keep in mind that you're not going to want to go very far uphill, and definitely not anything steep without hiking the bike.

    Honestly, though, as everyone here has said: The Demo is a downhill sled, and pedaling is an afterthought. Unless you're going to use it for downhill, you'd be better served with some of the other options mentioned here. There are plenty of other bikes that are very DH capable but still pedal-worthy. The Demo series of bikes, however, is built entirely with DH in mind and no compromises are made for pedaling ability

    Look at the Reign X, SX Trail, Canfield stuff, etc.
    Last edited by Tom S; 12-13-2008 at 04:21 PM.

  16. #16
    dft
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    is the demo really that hard to pedal, much harder than a 7 inch stinky, 40 pounder? that is the only bike i have and i regularly do 5000 foot climbs with it.(it even has 8 inch boxxer on it)

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dft
    is the demo really that hard to pedal, much harder than a 7 inch stinky, 40 pounder? that is the only bike i have and i regularly do 5000 foot climbs with it.(it even has 8 inch boxxer on it)
    I don't think anyone here is saying that the Demo 7 trail bike is impossible. What we're saying is that if you're looking for a do everything bike rather than a dedicated DH bike, then you'll get far more enjoyment from a more appropriate bike. This is coming from several people here who have been in the same situation.

    So to summarize: Yes, you can trail ride a Demo 7 if you want. But you don't want to. You may think you want to, but you don't.

  18. #18
    RTG
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    If you're ok with the different angles, extra weight, etc then by all means go for it, the Demo is surely pedable. In the end it's your decision, so do what you please... people are only trying to give some advice.

    When you think DH bikes are the bomb and don't mind the disadvantages while riding xc with it, who's going to stop you?

  19. #19
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    Just like the Fat Girl....

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom S

    So to summarize: Yes, you can trail ride a Demo 7 if you want. But you don't want to. You may think you want to, but you don't.
    that insists on wearing the skimpy bikini......She may be able to fit in it, may think she looks good, BUT PLEASE DON'T.

  20. #20
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    the geometry makes climbing very difficult because you have to put a lot of weight forward and you have to use your arms to hold that position. its exhausting but doable.

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