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  1. #1
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    Silly seat question

    Actually, there is no such thing as a silly question if we are all here to learn. My 2007 diamond back response has the stock wtb saddle and post. The thing always comes loose no matter how much i tighten the torx screw. I like my seat to be level and it always ends up tilting up. Not sure why?

    Does anyone know the stock weight of the post? And have any of you replaced it with a lighter one and cost?

    Love my diamondback and im using a lot of your opinions to make it badass..
    I like to ride my bike.

  2. #2
    Singletrack Slayer
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    The Splines are worn out on the post, its kind a cheap anyway. Buy a Thomson post! ~$80 Worth the money. Or if you want to really change the way the bike rides buy a Niner carbon RDO post. It flexs and has a good inch of "suspension" $~200 It's awesome.
    If you need cheaper post any $~40 alloy double clamp post will do
    ~~~~~~Singletrack Slayer~~~~~~~

  3. #3
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    David, what is the spline? Im new to all of this.. A thompson post? Is it lighter and more durable than my current post set up? Where can I look to find these? Thanks
    I like to ride my bike.

  4. #4
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    More or less the little groove that "bite" the post and rotating plate, basically cheap chinese seat post, it's trashed buy a new one. Google Thomson Seatpost in your size I think is either a 30.9 or 31.6 I think...
    Thomson post are some of the best, Lighter than most and super strong made in USA in GA! I have been using Thomson for over 12 yrs, never once had a problem with stems and post and seatclamps.
    ~~~~~~Singletrack Slayer~~~~~~~

  5. #5
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    You can always trim the excess off your post to save weight as well. Set it at your highest riding height, mark it, measure another 4" down, and cut off anything else below that.

  6. #6
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    great ideas.. i will look into some now
    I like to ride my bike.

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