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  1. #1
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    Rockshox xc32tk opinions

    Any thoughts on this fork for for a 2013 response XE 29er, it seems like the cost to quality ratio is pretty decent. I want to ditch the pogo stick xct fork, but I don't want to have to upgrade to a different wheelset, so this seems like a logical upgrade to me, for now. I'm still not sure I want to go head first into a high dollar build with this bike, I'd rather just pick up a sortie down the line, but in the mean time, I'll stick to my good ol response...


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  2. #2
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    Suntour has a "trade up" program. You might want to contact them, and see what your options are. If nothing makes sense, you are probably on the right track when you mention just riding your Response until you are ready to pick up something else.
    Bike Doctor



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    Rockshox xc32tk opinions

    I just looked at that program, I found it on the website...they had the epicon for $389 including the trade up, I see those forks for $299 all day long...no so much of a deal, but I'll call them tomorrow anyways..


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  4. #4
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    I picked up the 28tk for a build last weekend. Hell of a deal for adjustable preload, lockout and rebound damping. Not sure you will like the inability to adjust compression damping. For my oldest son who never makes adjustments to anything on his bike, it's a perfect fit, albeit a bit heavy for my taste.

  5. #5
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    Rockshox xc32tk opinions

    I'm a noob to mtb, and I already hate my "preload adjustable" xct...so I'm sure I'll love the xc32tk lol...I'm 240 lbs, and it feels like I'm just murdering that little xct. I figure 32mm stanchions would help, plus it won't break the bank, and it'll keep me on the trail. I'll most likely buy a better FS bike in the next couple of years, but until then, might as well put a little more money into my response and make it a decent rig I can smash on, then I can have a decent back up bike when I'm done with it...


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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xjtim View Post
    I just looked at that program, I found it on the website...they had the epicon for $389 including the trade up, I see those forks for $299 all day long...no so much of a deal, but I'll call them tomorrow anyways..


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    Well, I took a little gander... The Epicon wouldn't work for what you're looking for anyway. It's a tapered steerer(which would require at minimum - a conversion kit) and the current models are 15mm thru axles(which would require at minimum - a new front wheel)

    Every Epicon fork I found on ebay was a 2012 or in some cases a 2013 fork, and you had to open the ad to see that it was a 26" fork. Didn't have much luck finding a good deal on a 29er. But I didn't spend too much time looking either.

    They would probably steer you toward the Raidon Air because that is a standard QR, and also a 1 1/8" straight steerer tube.
    Bike Doctor



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    Rockshox xc32tk opinions

    Thanks Blackhawk...yeah, I see that...I guess the xc even looks better now lol...I'll probably be picking it up in a couple of weeks, in terms of installing it myself--I'm extremely mechanically inclined, I've been a mechanic for about 9 years, but like I said, I'm a noob to mtb, should I take it in to my lbs? Or try to install it myself, it seems the only thing touchy is getting the length of the steerer right...correct me if I'm wrong, please!


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  8. #8
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    Being mechanically inclined is half the battle. I train people in bike assembly and repair every day... The other half is the tools. Like cars/motorcycles, there's quite a few "special" tools needed to work on bicycles. Just depends on what you are doing.
    Basic maint, a tune up, etc. Metric hex keys 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6. Metric wrenches 8, 9, 10. Phillips screwdriver. Which is pretty easy to come by if you're already a mechanic.

    However, the caveat of that is when you start talking about forks, cranks, or the drivetrain in general? You are flooded with specialty tools... Star nut setters, steerer tube cutting guides, crown race puller, crown race setter, crank puller, freewheel/cassette tools, chain ship or vise whip, bottom bracket tools, derailleur alignment gauge, chain tool, etc... I think you get the picture.

    If you want to do your own work, I would invest in getting a good bicycle tool kit, and a home work stand. Just be aware. Even spending a couple hundred bucks on a good tool kit, you will still not have the "big" specialty stuff. But you would be able to tackle about 95% of what you would come across.

    Sorry, got off track. To answer your question, I would probably take the bike into the shop. It's a pretty simple swap if you have all of the tools handy.
    Bike Doctor



  9. #9
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    Rockshox xc32tk opinions

    Thanks a ton Blackhawk, you've answered my question 100 times over...I totally understand specialty tools, pullers etc...none of which I have for mtb lol...I will be taking it in to my lbs...although, I'll probably end up with a nice tool kit, like you said, eventually. Thank you so much for your advice!


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  10. #10
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    No problem. Always willing to lend advice so that new riders.
    Bike Doctor



  11. #11
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    Installing the xc32

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackhawks01 View Post
    Being mechanically inclined is half the battle. I train people in bike assembly and repair every day... The other half is the tools. Like cars/motorcycles, there's quite a few "special" tools needed to work on bicycles. Just depends on what you are doing.
    Basic maint, a tune up, etc. Metric hex keys 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6. Metric wrenches 8, 9, 10. Phillips screwdriver. Which is pretty easy to come by if you're already a mechanic.

    However, the caveat of that is when you start talking about forks, cranks, or the drivetrain in general? You are flooded with specialty tools... Star nut setters, steerer tube cutting guides, crown race puller, crown race setter, crank puller, freewheel/cassette tools, chain ship or vise whip, bottom bracket tools, derailleur alignment gauge, chain tool, etc... I think you get the picture.

    If you want to do your own work, I would invest in getting a good bicycle tool kit, and a home work stand. Just be aware. Even spending a couple hundred bucks on a good tool kit, you will still not have the "big" specialty stuff. But you would be able to tackle about 95% of what you would come across.

    Sorry, got off track. To answer your question, I would probably take the bike into the shop. It's a pretty simple swap if you have all of the tools handy.
    I'll be honest I wouldn't consider myself extremely mechanically inclined, but I have half a brain! I didn't buy any specialty tools to install my xc32tk solo air, I bought a pipe cutter for 11/8" tubing some park tool grease, and cut down an old curtain rod to use as a headset remover, and used a small Philips head screw driver to set the star-but a 1/2" down in the steer tube, and it worked just as good as spending 200 on "specialty" tools. I think you should def buy tools to work on your bike, but this isn't a hard job to do! Just look up on you tube, home made tools for installing headset and fork, and tons of options come up... But, supporting your lbs is always good too, just don't be intimidated by doing this job, cause if your extremely mechanically inclined, you are over qualified to do this job.

  12. #12
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    ^^ That's awesome!! Way to be resourceful It's like MacGyver the Bike Mechanic.


    How did you get the race off of your stock fork? Or is that what you meant when you said "headset remover"?
    Bike Doctor



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackhawks01 View Post
    ^^ That's awesome!! Way to be resourceful It's like MacGyver the Bike Mechanic.


    How did you get the race off of your stock fork? Or is that what you meant when you said "headset remover"?
    I literally used a butter knife, and a hammer the butter knife fits between the race and the fork perfectly! You just tap it and turn the fork until you have created a gap around the steer tube. By headset remover I cut a curtain rod into fourths and fanned it out pulled it through the head tube, and pushed down until it makes a connection with the inside of the headset and you use a hammer and remove the headset. ( I replaced my fork and headset at the same time) I'm telling you go on you tube and look it up, there's some amazing tips on there.

  14. #14
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    For the crown setter I bought a piece of 1 1/2" pipe cut it to 8" and used that to set the crown race, and bought a 12" piece of threaded rod some 1/2" bolts and washers to make a headset press. All in all, I spent about 20 bucks for the pipe cutter, grease, and new star nut, and did this job in 15 mins... Oh, I bought a rads bike stand on eBay for 25 bucks, and bought new bolts to make that better as well. So ok, I spent 50 and I'll have those tools forever. But, I did by a crank puller, and cassette removing tool just to have them. I agree you need to buy some tools, but the things I made for next to nothing it will cost you about 200.

  15. #15
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    Ahhh. Didn't know you changed the headset too. That's pretty cool.

    I know you can find some crazy/amazing stuff on YouTube. Fortunately I work at a shop so I have access to everything. And I am lucky enough to have a stand and about 80% of the tools at home.
    Bike Doctor



  16. #16
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    Yea, That's awesome! I just think buying a crown race setter is a little crazy! But, if i had access to a shop, I'd absolutely love that. I've replaced everything on my bike except my crankset right now I did it by myself, and buy what I can at my lbs to support those guys.

  17. #17
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    Truthfully, it's good to have guys like Blackhawk on this forum because, your getting shop advice at home! Some of the guys at the lbs where I live in plymouth, Ma aren't too forthcoming with the info you need! I spent a lot of money in the two local shops we have here, and some of these guys are *****! They want to do the job so they don't want to give as much advice is sometimes needed... Which is why I have to go to you tube. I'm new to mtb, but I am not new to bikes! I have a heavy bmx background, but getting familiar with derailers adjustments and setting suspension, etc to get your bike running well, can be intimidating or overwhelming!! So thanks Blackhawk for helping us out!

  18. #18
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    Yep, I will offer help/advice to anyone.
    Bike Doctor



  19. #19
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    Reddy, one of my closest friends in part owner of Bikeworks in Swansea. He has worked there since he was about 14 and is one of the best mechanics and all around good guys you'll meet. If you ever need anything go there / call and talk to Matt. Tell him John sent you!!

  20. #20
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    Sweet! Thanks man, I really appreciate that.

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    Listen!

    Xjtim Just some food for thought, seeing as your a big guy weighing in at 240, you may need to buy a stiffer spring for that fork, since it comes stock with the medium spring. Blue sky cycling has the solo air shipped for 193, but if your not interested in that, I know they have the xc32 tk, shipped for 173 and you can pick up a stiffer spring on eBay for pretty cheap, maybe 20-30 bucks. But, I love the fork you just def give it a shot, I think you'll be a lot happier than what the reviews say .

  22. #22
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    Rockshox xc32tk opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by Reddy27 View Post
    Xjtim Just some food for thought, seeing as your a big guy weighing in at 240, you may need to buy a stiffer spring for that fork, since it comes stock with the medium spring. Blue sky cycling has the solo air shipped for 193, but if your not interested in that, I know they have the xc32 tk, shipped for 173 and you can pick up a stiffer spring on eBay for pretty cheap, maybe 20-30 bucks. But, I love the fork you just def give it a shot, I think you'll be a lot happier than what the reviews say .
    I just picked up my bike, I bought the xc32tk solo air with poploc. I had it installed so I wouldn't screw it up lol...and yeah, I'm a tank so I think the air would be better for me lol...so far, I just rode around the neighborhood and could tell an immediate difference, this Sunday, I'll hit the trails and see how it does...so far, I'm very happy! Out the door, labor included $282...and it was free...at least not out of my pocket...I got some birthday money!


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  23. #23
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    Good for you XJtim. I have had my xc32tk with solo air installed for a year now and i love it after the xct. Heads up, give the fork a few miles to break in and experiment with the air pressures and rebound setting. Once you find the right combo you will know. You can install the argyle moco damper and get a decent damper but in all honesty, the tk damper does the job at my weight (245 lb geared up). The right air pressure made all the difference for me. Maintenance on the fork is easy, just make sure you have the right hex keys and socket to remove the damper and spring.

    You can also change the travel with the solo air spring by removing/adding spacers 80mm/100mm/120mm.

    Enjoy your ride, you got a great fork.

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