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  1. #1
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    New question here. Release 3 suspension help

    Ok, I need some help from the experts here

    I have a 2017 Release 3 and with gear and everything I weight around 280 (big boy). No matter what I do, I continually bottom out the rear suspension. I've been reading up and though about switching to a regular air can or even a coil, but both sound extreme and it may not make any difference.

    Any suggestion so on what I can do short of going on a diet?

  2. #2
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    First off, what psi's are you running? First step is to up the pressure, if I remember, max PSI is somewhere around 350? If you're pump only goes to 300, its pretty hard to guestimate 320 psi or so...its a lot more pumps than you think to get from 300 to 320, and crappy shock pumps have a hard time pushing any air at those psi's. Additionally, many (most) shock pump gauges are way, way off - so you may be under pressuring anyway. See if you can use a "good" one from a LBS.

    Next step is volume reducers if you haven't gone that route, after that, changing the aircan is fairly inexpensive and supposedly necessary for many on this shock. I don't think the suspension progression on this bike is conducive to a coil shock.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  3. #3
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    The max PSI is 275 per the service manual. I'm a little unclear on changing the can. Is that something I can buy online and do myself?

    I did add some bands (like 6 of them). I wasn't sure how many I should add.

    I'll go to a local bike shop and look for a better shock pump (I am using the one that came with the bike).

  4. #4
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    smaller can and/or volume reducers would help (you can use inner tube instead of the official rockshox rubber bands) run in the pedal position if you're still having trouble and maxed out on everything. Have you been able to set your sag at 20-30% properly without exceeding the 275? you'll get more ramp-up with a smaller can and volume reducers.

  5. #5
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    Don't go by the max air pressure from a manual, see what's listed on the shock itself. There should be a small sticker on the can somewhere...275 max psi is typically for a standard can, your bike (and mine) are spec'd with the Debonair cans, which can take a higher pressure...325-350, so definitely double check. Hopefully, this is the case, because air is free, and this should take care of your problems. IF this is the case, once you up the pressure, you may want to remove some air reduction bands to get some of the suppleness back, and you will probably need to make adjustments to the rebound.
    I'm a bigger guy too, and run around 285 psi. I'm not surprised you're blowing through travel with the pressure set below your weight. All three of our level link DB's run better when we set the back end up around 10% psi over rider+gear weight. Good luck and report back, interested to see what you come up with.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

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