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  1. #1
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    Overdrive Sport Ghetto Tubeless

    Has anyone went ghetto tubeless with the stock tires/rims?

    If so, how was the outcome?

  2. #2
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    I have ran ghetto tubeless on the stock wheels. Gorilla Tape, old tire valve stems, stans and conti mountain kings. 26 psi front 28 rear. No burping and no leaks from the bead. They snapped on nice and tight. I only stopped running them because I upgraded to some stans arch ex.

  3. #3
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    Lardo, You try it yet? I think I am about to next month. Right now I am running kevlar strips, tubes and lots of slime for all the tackweed we have out here. Pretty heavy setup. I'll let you know how it goes on these 32h Weinmann SL-7 Doublewall rims.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateDubya View Post
    Lardo, You try it yet? I think I am about to next month. Right now I am running kevlar strips, tubes and lots of slime for all the tackweed we have out here. Pretty heavy setup. I'll let you know how it goes on these 32h Weinmann SL-7 Doublewall rims.

    I ended up doing this on the sport (even though I now have the Pro).

    I used the Stan's kit on the sport, zero issues.

    On the pro, I ordered the Tessa tape off of ebay (which is the same tape, you get WAY more for 20 bucks) and still had no problems.

    Make sure you do not do it in the garage though when it is cold out. i did this on my pro and had major problems, most likely cause the cold tape and rims were causing the tape not to stick in parts.

  5. #5
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    Lardo, thanks for the reply.

    For the record to others.....

    Over the weekend I was able to convert the stock rims that came on my 2013 Overdrive Sport, which are 32h Weinmann SL-7 Doublewall to tubeless rims. I used 1" Gorilla tape and a WTB TCS valve. I drilled out the inner wall of the rim (be carefull not to drill through the outer wall) with a 5/16 bit (3/8 was too big for this valve as is recommended for a Stan's Valve). As mentioned by Lardo before installing the tire or adding the sealant I found that it is wise to let the tape cure under room temperatures or use a warm rim. I considered adding little heat from a heat gun but didn't need to. To install the tire i removed the valve core, soaped up the bead, and blasted it with about 50-60 PSI. The Orange Seal sealant I had came with a threaded end that threaded perfectly onto my Harbor Freight compressor fitting allowing direct pressure from the air gun. If you bought your compressor fittings from Harbor freight it is very likely you have the same fitting. After I set the bead I installed about 3 ounces of Orange Seal into the tire through the valve and blasted it again. Quickly placed my finger over the valve, and shook the tire a bit, bumped it on the floor a couple of times. Next swiftly replaced my finger with the valve core and tightened with some needle nose pliers. Bumped your tire on the ground a few more times, shook it, spun it, etc. Done!

    Note that the first rim was a work in progress for about 5-6 hours over a few days. I failed twice because I was doing it wrong. It was frustrating and thought it was impossible. The second one, because I knew what I was doing and had the right supplies and tools only took 20 minutes from start to finish. Easy. The key was having the removable valve core to allow direct air flow burst and a folding tire in lieu of the loose fitting wire beads that came stock on my bike. I am pretty sure I could get the stock WTB tires to bead now that I know a few tricks (thanks Youtube!) but would not recommend it to first timer. Also, on the first tire I got one sides bead set by using a a tube to inflate and then pulling the tube out. Once I had the process down however the soapy water and hand setting the bead was all it took.

    I must say this has been a very rewarding experience. By accomplishing this I've replaced a heavy wire bead tire with a lighter folding bead, dropped the weight of the tube and dropped the weight of the Kevlar tire liners. Also dropped the weight of the slime sealant which is much heavier than the Orange Seal. Total Cost for both rims including sealant $33.00.

  6. #6
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    This is nice to hear. I wanted to give this a go on my Overdrive Sport but my bike shop said it couldn't be done with my rims. Which tires did you get? I think I might try this when I need to ones.

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