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  1. #1
    VRC Illuminati
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    The last real bike Raleigh made...

    Anyone have one they want to give me?
    I'm sure they have a fine line of bikes....just not like these...
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    -eric-

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  2. #2
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    No good

    I don't know what happened to them but their bikes are so much inferior to the other manufacturers that seems like a waste of time and money to even consider buying their products.

    I bought an Octane 24 for my son mid last year and in less than 2 months I replaced the whole drivetrain, hubs, fork, stem, seatpost, handlebar and pedals. The quality is so bad that everything was failing right off the store. Why I got it you may ask, easy, it was the only manufacturer known to me that offered aluminum frames in their kids line. After purchasing and upgrading it I found out that Kona and other quality manufacturers offered aluminum frames in their kids lines too.

    Here's a pic of his bike.
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    Last edited by DiRt DeViL; 12-27-2003 at 04:10 AM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL
    I don't know what happened to them but their bikes are so much inferior to the other manufacturers that seems like a waste of time and money to even consider buying their products.

    I bought an Octane 24 for my son mid last year and in less than 2 months I replaced the whole drivetrain, hubs, fork, stem, seatpost, handlebar and pedals. The quality is so bad that everything was failing right off the store. Why I got it you may ask, easy, it was the only manufacturer known to me that offered aluminum frames in their kids line. After purchasing and upgrading it I found out that Kona and other quality manufacturers offered aluminum frames in their kids lines too.

    Here's a pic of his bike.
    Hey Dirt;

    Sorry to hear that your kid's bike didn't meet up to your expectations. That particular model was built with low end parts on it because it is primarily designed as a what is known as a "kids side walk bike". I don't know what your childs riding level is, nor am I here to speculate on it. I just wanted you to be aware that. As your child grows and gets better, they would then (hopefully) move up to a more adult Raleigh bike, which you would then see, come with the level of parts that you and I are more acustomed too.

    Good luck.
    Some of my happiest memories in life took place on my bicycles. - Me

  4. #4
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    I wasn't aware about that the Octane was supposed to be a "kids side walk bike". I surfed the net for kids bikes and that was the best I found. The ones from Giant, Trek and others were even worse.

    Thanks for pointing that out.

  5. #5
    High Octane
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    My dad did replaced a lot of parts but I love this bike. It's helping me develop XC skills that I need to continue racing.

    2003 was a great year for me, I won my age group championship and demostrated that kids with dissabilities (I have speech dissability) can perform equally or better than "normal" kids. For 2004 I plan to continue racing but on a new age group so wish me luck.

  6. #6
    U V
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    i heard that the reason Raleigh don't make 'decent' bikes is that they don't race enymore.
    i went out yesterday to buy a 'good' Raleigh from my main dealer because about ten years ago they made some lovely bikes [and in England too] an it would of suited me down to the ground. but all i found was 'kids' bikes :-(

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL
    I don't know what happened to them but their bikes are so much inferior to the other manufacturers that seems like a waste of time and money to even consider buying their products.

    I bought an Octane 24 for my son mid last year and in less than 2 months I replaced the whole drivetrain, hubs, fork, stem, seatpost, handlebar and pedals. The quality is so bad that everything was failing right off the store. Why I got it you may ask, easy, it was the only manufacturer known to me that offered aluminum frames in their kids line. After purchasing and upgrading it I found out that Kona and other quality manufacturers offered aluminum frames in their kids lines too.

    Here's a pic of his bike.

    Back in the eighties Raleigh changed their approach substantially, they never really commited to mtn. bikes and they have never attepted to make a big showing in this market. It's clear their passion is in road bikes. I ride a Heritage and I love it, a top notch steel frame and Campy 10spd. to boot.

  8. #8
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    Wink My Raleigh

    Here is my Raleigh. It is a '94 MT400. This baby was ridden on many trails throughout the east coast. Still ride her every once in awhile. The only remaining stock part is the front derailleur.

    Not willing to let her go. Now she only sees the occasional weekend short trail ride. Bought her on a misquoted price from the local Raleigh dealer. Saved $200 because of the shops mistake.

    She is a real mountain bike, and her and I have zipped by quite a few 'Dales, Specialz, and Treks, that were at least twice as much, back in the day.
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  9. #9
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    thats one of those half aluminum/half steel bikes, correct? ive got an old bike mag that has a small write up on the mt400. glad you enjoy it

  10. #10
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    Yep! Sure is. The rear triangle is cro-moly and the top-tube, head-tube, and down tube are all aluminum. Raleigh called this mix build Technium. I have a Raleigh road bike from 1987 that is built in the same fashion.

    When I bought her she was 27lbs. After changing basically all the components I got her down to 24.75lbs.

    Curious. What did the magazine rider say about the MT400?


    Quote Originally Posted by steveit
    thats one of those half aluminum/half steel bikes, correct? ive got an old bike mag that has a small write up on the mt400. glad you enjoy it
    You cannot go against nature, because when you do, its part of nature too.

  11. #11
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    it was a pretty much "middle of the road" review. didnt love it tho didnt hate it either. mentioned the john tomac/raleigh connection and the negatives were mostly given to the components, not the bike as a whole, if that makes any sense. mentioned good handling.

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=DiRt DeViL]I don't know what happened to them but their bikes are so much inferior to the other manufacturers that seems like a waste of time and money to even consider buying their products.
    QUOTE]

    hey......

    I own a Raleigh.(so does my dad) I really like it, It is a good bike I only had one prolbem with the cheap Sr Suntour fork that is on it. Which I am still having prolbems with. Gotta take it to the shop to get that fixed

  13. #13
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    Any body remember this Raleigh?

    I had what I think was an early 90's Raleigh mountain bike that was silver. The bike had a heavy luged frame with the tubes being silver aluminum. The tubes were "anodized" splattered blue. I think it was most likely a higher mid-priced bike, not anywhere as fancy as the TI luged things. The words Technium or something seem to stand out in my mind. Anybody know what I'm talking about?

  14. #14
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    Max

    Hey guys.

    I used to have a Raleigh Max about 12 or so years ago, mega oversized frame (when the amount a frame was oversized seemed to be a selling point) dark red in colour, rigid.

    Loved that bike, miss it. Now im sad.

    I'd've probably carried on purchasing Raleigh bikes if they'd carried on making decent ones (ride a Cdale F800 now) but, sadly, they all seem to be for kids, or any adult ones are just nasty, its a shame when you consider Raleigh is such a household name.

  15. #15
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    Example?

    Quote Originally Posted by dazzlerdee
    Hey guys.

    I used to have a Raleigh Max about 12 or so years ago, mega oversized frame (when the amount a frame was oversized seemed to be a selling point) dark red in colour, rigid.

    Loved that bike, miss it. Now im sad.

    I'd've probably carried on purchasing Raleigh bikes if they'd carried on making decent ones (ride a Cdale F800 now) but, sadly, they all seem to be for kids, or any adult ones are just nasty, its a shame when you consider Raleigh is such a household name.
    Can you provide an example of why/what is so nasty about them? this isn't a knock, just an honest question.
    Some of my happiest memories in life took place on my bicycles. - Me

  16. #16
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    Australian M600

    I have a Raleigh M600 that I purchased in Australia back in year 2001. Somehow, the M600 here in Australia are lowly speced and cheap, compared to the American version. Mine came with 7-speed Shimano Altus derailers with ProMax brakes and RST Omni 191 fork.

    I have since changed out every part of the bike (to Deore groupset etc) with only the frame as the original part. However, I do admit that I love the geometry of the frame and will not swap it for any other frame.

  17. #17
    leconkie
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    Hope

    Hi guys,
    While we're getting all misty about Raleigh, I had a Raleigh Cresham Flyer when I was 5 or 6 years old. That was 30 years ago, it was my first bike and I absolutely loved it. I can still remember it! In the 80's I had a Raleigh Arena "racing" bike in light metallic blue, which was used more like a BMX than anything else, cos my mate had a Grifter. I used to go on trails with it, I jumped it (NOT a good idea with that hard plastic saddle), I threw it about and abused it as unthinkingly as any 14 year old could and I don't think I even got a puncture in 3 years. Oh, I also had a Chopper and nearly killed myself about 4 times a day from doing the infamous wheelie trick.
    It goes without saying that I would love to be justified in buying a Raleigh nowadays, but I wouldn't even consider it. They're still seen as English-made quality in high street Japanese bike shops. Are there any good Raleighs still out there, for road or anything?

    (p.s. to all Raleigh execs trawling the web- get your stuff together)

  18. #18
    British Dark Slider
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    Pay peanuts..

    Quote Originally Posted by Mellow Yellow
    Can you provide an example of why/what is so nasty about them? this isn't a knock, just an honest question.
    Pay peanuts you get monkeys.

    The frames and build quality are fine - and in some instances, much better quality than other manufacturers, on a cost/benefit side by side analysis.

    What yo uhave to realise is the price they are selling at. The components are sh1t on some of these bikes, and this is the same for ALL kids bikes, regardless of manufacturer.

    What one must realise is that there are NO manufacturers of quality kids components, ESPECIALLY cheap suspension forks.

    Dont be surprised if your cheap suspension forks or components break or dont live up to the task you THOUGHT they might be used for.

    If they do, remember you pay peanuts you get monkeys! - Buying cheap in bikes is a genuine example of false economy. I used to work in a bike shop in the Highlands and that is one of the hardest environments known to bikers - which is why UK bikes are better shielded and better mud clearance than US spec ones. Also they come with more aggressive tyres, since it is usually wetter, muddier, etc. Just look at the World Downhill Cup in Fort William in Scotland for an example.

    I saw a lot of bike casualties and broken bits, especially from customers buying cheap bikes and parts.

    Buy cheap and you will regret it. Either that or moderate your cycling to the price point that you have spent.

    harsh unfortunately, but true.

  19. #19
    U V
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    Raleigh's USA site has some lovely looking bikes on there, just a shame the ones you get in England are not as nice. or not enymore. as in the mid 80's they where doing some realy good bikes

  20. #20
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    RaleighAmerica

    This may seem a bit cold on the Mtb. community, but name matters alot to alot of people. As many who use raleighs have stated, the frames are of top notch shape while the components tend to be fairly bad (or low end if you will). Some people may purchase a bike with raleigh on the downtube if it were specd higher, but when price puts it into competition with other bike names, the snob in many bike purchasers arise. The name is not seen as bringing the same status per dollar as other names can. This makes it difficult for Raleigh to justify producing many high(er) end bikes. Add to that Lance Armstrong rides a Trek, and now everyone has a low end trek (whose frames are not that great, bikes are specd the same, and cost 5-10% more than a comperable Raleigh or Diamondback). The bike industry (esp. the US Mtb. Bike industry) has a cold and finicy client base.

  21. #21
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    i have a "yukon" (1993model! -rigid - 7000km off-road with it) ) and a "max lite fs3" ('99 model). On the max lite i have changed wheels, rear derailleur, rear shock, pedals, bottom bracket and i'm gonna change fork and disc brake too. The next bike won';t be raleigh, because the quality of their bikes isn;t that good anymore.

  22. #22
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    They've gone away from that...

    Quote Originally Posted by welcomdmat
    This may seem a bit cold on the Mtb. community, but name matters alot to alot of people. As many who use raleighs have stated, the frames are of top notch shape while the components tend to be fairly bad (or low end if you will). Some people may purchase a bike with raleigh on the downtube if it were specd higher, but when price puts it into competition with other bike names, the snob in many bike purchasers arise. The name is not seen as bringing the same status per dollar as other names can. This makes it difficult for Raleigh to justify producing many high(er) end bikes. Add to that Lance Armstrong rides a Trek, and now everyone has a low end trek (whose frames are not that great, bikes are specd the same, and cost 5-10% more than a comperable Raleigh or Diamondback). The bike industry (esp. the US Mtb. Bike industry) has a cold and finicy client base.
    You'll start to see a change in attitude with the 2005 model year bikes.
    Some of my happiest memories in life took place on my bicycles. - Me

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