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  1. #1
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    1998 Carbon V6 Team

    Anyone have/had one?

    How does it ride compared to bikes today? This is my Dad's bike and I've been riding it a lot, and so far I like it. It's stock except for a new saddle, stem, seatpost and pedals.

    I don't have any complaints about it really, but I want to spend some money. I'm trying to decide if I should upgrade it, or get an entirely new bike (since it seems somewhat outdated)..

    What do you guys think?

    Here's a photo I took of it after my ride yesterday..


  2. #2
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
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    Wow, never saw one in carbon before.

  3. #3
    John Galt
    Reputation: cegrover's Avatar
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    Very cool bike! It's pretty much the same frame as the 1997 V-Link Pro, but in a different color. Specs, etc. on are my site: http://www.geocities.com/cegrover/DBR Note that the 1998 spec page in the DBR catalog listed the wrong shock - your's is the Strata Pro, just like on the V8 model, and not a Helix.

    Be sure to check the pivots for cracks. Most problems I've heard of involved longer-travel versions of the frame and I've never specifically heard of a problem with a carbon frame. That being said, I think they used the same rear triangle and I may not have heard of problems simply because there aren't as many of them out there. There's more info on frame problems at this link: http://www.geocities.com/cegrover/vlink_issues.html

    There are some differences vs. more modern frames, but your suspension design is basically still in use today and there's no reason not to ride and enjoy the bike. The suspension travel will be a little shorter than most modern FS bikes, at 3.25", but it's not far from a typical 4" XC bike. The primary areas where you may notice performance differences vs. newer bikes are:

    1) Shock: That's a really nice and light 1998 air shock, but you might benefit from a newer design with a pedal platform. That being said, I believe you have a lockout for long climbs, so it may not be a big issue. The shock might also benefit from a rebuild if it's never been done - PUSH industries or Hippietech Suspension can probably help, and may be able to tune the shock to your weight and riding style. Unfortunately, Stratos is out of business and can't rebuild or supply parts themselves anymore.

    2) Fork - same basic issues as with the shock, but you might have better luck finding parts for an older Manitou, as there were more of them in the first place. If you go with a new fork at some point, you probably don't want more than 3-4" (80-100mm) of travel, to keep it in line with the rear of the bike and avoid changing the geometry.

    3) The frame does not have a rear disc brake mount. Good v-brakes should be fine, so this may be a non-issue. If, however, you find yourself riding in wet or muddy conditions a lot, you may want to consider a disc adapter for the rear - it's been done and, I think, is documented on this forum.

    Ultimately, I say keep it maintained and enjoy it, then decide, over time, what parts you'd like to change (if any) based on your experience on the bike. DB has no parts available anymore, but parts and frames come up on eBay and Craigslist from time to time.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the tips cegrover, I sent you a PM.

    Real cool website. It's helped me a bunch since I have a few Diamondbacks. Great to find out it was one of the mtbr.com members that put it up.

  5. #5
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    Anyone have any idea how much travel I should go for when upgrading the front suspension on this bike?

    I'm looking to upgrade but have heard if I have too much travel I can crack the head tube.

  6. #6
    John Galt
    Reputation: cegrover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHNguyen89
    Anyone have any idea how much travel I should go for when upgrading the front suspension on this bike?

    I'm looking to upgrade but have heard if I have too much travel I can crack the head tube.
    I'm not sure about cracking a head tube, although I can imagine a really long fork would put odd loads on it. The main concern about adding travel to a bike is the bike's geometry, which translates into handling and steering.

    The V6 Team came with 70 mm of front travel, the V8 had 60mm, the 'long travel' V-Link and V-6 (non-team) had 80mm and the V10 had 100mm. You can put a 100mm fork on a V-Link and not have problems, but you might start to notice a difference if you do that on a bike with 70mm (or less) stock. So..if yours is a V6 team, I say stick with an 80-85mm fork.

    If that's not enough travel, you may be trying to use a cross-country bike for long-travel bike purposes and may want to consider a different frame...

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