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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by cujarrett View Post
    The guy asked a question that I tried to help with. I wasn't in front of my Crux so I posted a link to where there was a detailed picture of one of the brake mounts, which was more than anyone else did after he asked twice.

    On another topic but related to this thread, did anyone else see the news Bike Radar posted about Sram recalling some of the hydraulic rim and disc brakes? Does anyone here have an effected serial numbered product?

    SRAM stops sale of Hydro Road brakes - BikeRadar
    Just messing with you a little, I'd seen in a different thread someone else giving you unwarranted grief. No offense intended.

    The bigger issue, one I didn't mention earlier, is that pix of your brakes won't really help us understand what the dickens Boubla is talking about. Your brakes look just like mine did, and nothing on my brakes or in your pictures looks even remotely like a rubber ring where the caliper mounts to the frame.

    To really answer his question, we need to see a pic of his brakes.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudge View Post
    Promoting the blog again??

    Those aren't rubber rings, but conical washers. If the face of the brake mounts are square, you don't need 'em. If not, you need 'em on both sides of the brake (between brake and fork, and between brake and bolt head). One set as shown won't allow for any meaningful adjustment that a plain washer won't do just as well.

    My Crux came with them on the front, but not the rear. I took 'em off the front, everything is still working just fine.
    Thanks, that's exactly the answer I was looking for, and then some. With the explanation so I'm a little less dumb now

    Everything's fine then

  3. #78
    little mad riding hood
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    Quote Originally Posted by tapeworm View Post
    I am starting to research the idea of buying the carbon crux (or someting similar: Giant TCX Advanced, Norco Threshold Carbon, Jamis Supernova, etc) and using it for both cyclocross and as a road bike. I haven't ridden any of them yet. How is the Crux as a road bike? Specifically, my current cross bike with Ritchey WCS carbon fork is fairly annoying on the road as the fork flexes all over the place. How is the geo on the Crux as a road bike? Any other considerations to consider for road riding? As a point of reference, I am used to my Scott CR1 Limited road bike. Thanks
    my Crux is about 1.5 kg heavier than my road bike and I don't notice the difference at all. In fact, I wound up riding it a bunch on the road after the floods happened here in Boulder (road damage / mud/sand/debris in the roads and general carnage) and ended up taking down a bunch of Strava PRs (on climbs, even) that I'd originally set with my fancy Campy-equipped Eye-talian road bike.

    I actually prefer the ride and handling to my roadie, truth be told. I'm planning to get a set of Stans road disc wheels to replace the heavy Axis ones, and mount them up with slicks.

    After talking with another racer out at one of the 'cross events who has the 2013 Sworks Crux Disc and wound up selling his road bike and just racing the Crux instead (in crits, even) I'm planning to do the same. None of the officials have batted an eye at anyone racing discs on the road, and I've heard of more than just this guy.

  4. #79
    little mad riding hood
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kris View Post
    My buddy has a 2014 Crux with SRAM hydro disc brakes. His last two cyclocross races have been hurt by the rear wheel coming out of the dropout. I assume it's the force of the brakes pulling the wheel down, but it's strange as I've never seen this problem with disc brake mountain bikes. He's tried two different types of skewers with the same result. I suggest he try the DT Swiss ratcheting skewers to see if that would fix it.

    Has anyone else had this problem on these bikes?
    Nope, and we have 2 in the household. I would suggest trying to contact your shop/dealer to see if this is a warranty / defect issue.

  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by tapeworm View Post
    How much do the 2014 Carbon Cruxes weigh?
    My Crux pro race red weighs 7.90kg with its roval wheelset on, including pedals rated at 343g (around 7.56kg without pedals). I've changed some components but these would have offset (force wifli cassette, red derailleur, enve cockpit but added gel strip) so it would be near enough to 7.6kg out of the box without pedals.

  6. #81
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    So I now have 4 or 5 races on my Crux Pro. It's pretty great. I am not someone who's a big canti hater. I've been pretty happy with my canti-braked bikes on the race course, in general (although I live in California, where it's rarely muddy), but bought the disc Crux, since a) It's what Spesh sells as a complete bike, and b) I'm pretty sure that canti-braked high-end frames will lose resale value pretty drastically.

    The bike's super stiff. It's a cliche, but when you step on the pedals, the bike just goes. The downside is, of course, a little less bump absorption, but that's what tires are for. I've been really happy with the handling. The balance is right for the slow-speed chicanes, but it's pretty confidence inspiring on faster, sketchier stuff as well. In fact, the word I'd use is confidence. In the times I've ridden it, that's the thing that's stood out for me.

    There are a few issues I have:
    - the front shifting is not quite consistent. Occasionally it just will not go into the big ring.
    - The bike's not light. I've not weighed it, but even with the fancy wheels (I got the Pro), i'd be shocked if it were below 17.5lbs, even with the lighter stem I put on it. I mean, it's still the lightest bike I've ever owned, but it's also the most expensive, by 3 or 4x.
    - The design of the specialized seatpost is such that I cannot get it low enough. The curve starts too low on the post. This is, admittedly, only a problem for people with short legs.
    - I had the same brake bite point problems that have been mentioned. I was able to resolve them, but at the cost of easy reach to the levers when in the drops.

    Pleasant surprises:
    - the SRAM hydro hoods, although they look pretty dorky, are surprisingly comfortable.
    - All reports to the contrary, the disc spacing on the Axis wheels and the fancy Roval tubies is the same, so wheels are easily swappable.
    - The Pro paint job is pretty sweet looking in person.

  7. #82
    little mad riding hood
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    "- The design of the specialized seatpost is such that I cannot get it low enough. The curve starts too low on the post. This is, admittedly, only a problem for people with short legs. "

    I've known a couple folks who've had this issue. It's a really dumb design for the smaller sizes. The inserts limit you from inserting the post past a certain point and they're really low down.

    I swapped the post for a fizik Cyrano because (another dumb design flaw) the single bolt design means I could never get it to hold angle, even torqued past spec, which is already insanely high (9nm or something crazy). Single bolt + cross is just a really bad idea.

    We've had the same experience with the wheels - they're pretty easily swappable for us; I think the only time we had rub issues was the first time or 2 we swapped them out. Pads bed in and they're fine.

  8. #83
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    Fantastic bike!

    I just did a 50 mile ride. Mix of gravel, dirt roads, road, snow...

    Wow this thing is super fast. I have the Crux Expert 2013, with several mods.

    Thomson seatpost and stem

    Mavic slr 29 wheels

    Ritchey evo curve carbon handlebar

    And hauling ass on the roads at 28-30mph was no problem.

    The bike climbs surprisingly well for 425mm chain stays.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Your thoughts about the Specialized Crux for 2014 with hydro brakes?-image.jpg  

    Sit and spin my ass...

  9. #84
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    Waiting for the BB7 brakes and Force levers as temporary replacements for the S-700 hydros on my '14 Elite EVO. Then they will send the revised hydros whenever they are available.
    Updates | SRAM Road Hydraulic Brake Recall
    There's only two things in life (but I forget what they are). - John Hiatt

  10. #85
    little mad riding hood
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluesDawg View Post
    Waiting for the BB7 brakes and Force levers as temporary replacements for the S-700 hydros on my '14 Elite EVO. Then they will send the revised hydros whenever they are available.
    Updates | SRAM Road Hydraulic Brake Recall
    just FYI the BB7s feel NOTHING like the hydros and you may be somewhat sad until the full hydro replacements are swapped out.

    The SRAM techs at CX Nats here in Boulder were saying May-June for replacements when I talked to them. And I talked to them because mine worked absolutely perfect with no issues right up until the rear brake failed (lever to the bar, total pressure loss) 3/4ths of the way through the first lap of my race on Thursday. No harm, no foul, I wasn't ever in contention to begin with, and I picked my way around the course okay (it was so muddy / icy / slick you just could not go fast). I don't have a pit bike so I sucked it up and rode it out, finished ahead of some others and had some excellent dirty fun. Ok it was a bit sketch with no rear brake but you barely use that one anyhow, right?

    My mechanic took one look at the bike back at the tent and marched me right over to the SRAM booth for recall replacement.

    Like I said way up in the beginning of the thread, we both knew we were taking a risk with early adoption. My husband's hydros are still completely fine and he raced 2 events at Nats plus the Boulder Rez "freezer-cross" with zero problems. He'll get them replaced either when they fail or he gets around to it.

    I wish mine still worked. The BB7s are all kinds of vague and mushy in comparison, but it's not enough to ruin the bike for me because it still rides and handles amazingly well.

  11. #86
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    SRAM UPDATE as of this morning, January 15th (I just got this in my email)

    Dear Cyclist with recalled SRAM Road Hydraulic Brakes:

    We want to update you on the progress of our Road Hydraulic Brake Recall. As we have previously announced, we are offering you a mechanical brake system installed at our cost at your favorite Dealer. These systems are being delivered into the market beginning this week. Please contact your Dealer so that they can get the proper parts on order, and they can schedule your replacement.

    In addition to a mechanical brake system, we are offering you the choice to upgrade to our new Model Year 15 hydraulic system, or if you want to keep the mechanical system, we will provide cash reimbursement of US$200 or EUR 150. Please note, our new Model Year 15 hydraulic brakes will be available starting in the second half of April. We hope that you will choose to upgrade and experience the benefits of a great hydraulic braking system.

    The recall process starts with contacting your Dealer who will initiate the replacement and tracking process. Once this has been initiated, SRAM will send an email to you confirming your contact information and replacement logistics. SRAM will reimburse the Dealer directly for installation cost.

    Thanks for your patience and support, and we apologize for this problem.

    SRAM
    I have to say SRAM have been completely aboveboard and gone the extra mile for this. As it turns out (from my last email update) it was not a seal problem as initially thought, there was actually a machining error that led to the master cylinders being very slightly convex in profile. Which of course meant that they will all fail over time as the seals eventually lose enough elasticity to compensate for the added space.

    Kudos to SRAM for being so forthcoming and transparent with the recall process and doing their level best to fix it. Yes we all hoped they'd get it right the first time but this is very new tech and I happen to work in quality assurance... this stuff happens despite your best efforts to prevent it.

    They've also mentioned they're reviewing their entire QA process so I interpret that to mean they're putting more controls in place in their process flow. Which tends to delay things like innovation / flexibility and turnaround times, but everything has a price.

  12. #87
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    Now, if sram/avid could just figure out how to make solid mtb disc brakes I'd be more confident. One can only hope this whole fiasco will force them to spend more time/money/etc developing better hydraulic designs for both the road and mtb side.

  13. #88
    little mad riding hood
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    from my years in engineering firms / military tool and die / biotech startups and pharma I can tell you - you work development programs on multiple axes. You can have innovation and rapid process to market but often at the cost of things like quality control. Or you can have flawless execution that takes a decade from prototype to consumer product. Generally the 2 don't mix well. It's one of the reasons Campagnolo is so cautious and reliable once to market, and SRAM tends to be much more innovative but has had quality control issues. SRAM is the new kid on the block in the bicycle components market and as such they need to bring something to the table that no one else has. I'm not surprised they tend to default towards rapid turnaround in innovation because they need the market share that brings. With it comes a reputation for their stuff being somewhat flakey but based on what I've seen from their mechanical road groups they do an extremely good job of follow up and revision as they receive feedback.

  14. #89
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    and for the record I've ridden the "gold standard" Shimano XT brakes in 8F temperatures and had them completely lock up / pack up on me. Mineral oil is not the best fluid choice for extremely low temps as the viscosity goes thru the roof.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by lonefrontranger View Post
    just FYI the BB7s feel NOTHING like the hydros and you may be somewhat sad until the full hydro replacements are swapped out.
    I kinda disagree. I've had shimano hydros, avid juicy 7 ultimates, formula megas with 180 up front and 160 in the rear. the megas had most power and best modulation, they were surgical, and really good solid feel to it all. now i run bb7 road, stock pads, shimano slx discs 180/160, cane creek short reach levers, jagwires road brake/shifter kit (I think its the best one). And these feel just as solid, has just as much power, just as slick action and just as good modulation as the megas. Maybe they don't feel exactly the same (but its really close if there is any difference at all) but the end result is just as good as one of the best hydros. If you know how to set up the bb7s and use good cables/wires and lube pivots and use good discs, then its the same crap.
    Last time I used meachanical brakes was when the xtr v's was launched, (last thursday obviously) so my experience setting up mechs were not exactly fresh, but this isn't exactly rocket surgery were talking here.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by lonefrontranger View Post
    and for the record I've ridden the "gold standard" Shimano XT brakes in 8F temperatures and had them completely lock up / pack up on me. Mineral oil is not the best fluid choice for extremely low temps as the viscosity goes thru the roof.
    Its actually usually poblems with the seals in the calipers on shimanos, but the oil isn't exactly helping either. the seals needs to be extended fully and cleaned with booze like 2 times a year, no spares to be had for shimanos hydros either. Mine became completely (90%) unusable at -20C, so I ditched them and never looked back.

    on monday it was -18C here when i rode to work and the bb7s worked totally flawless. these are idiot proof.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  17. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    If you know how to set up the bb7s and use good cables/wires and lube pivots and use good discs, then its the same crap.
    not even close and we're talking a SRAM professional CX pit wrench who works with very finicky riders, plus the pro wrench at my shop (BCS a top pro shop that specializes in CX builds and caters to several national champions). They used jagwire cables and the whole bit and the result is not even close to the SRAM hydros when they were working properly.

    if you have not ridden a cyclocross bike equipped with SRAM hydros then I submit you have no basis for comparison. I have 2 mountain bikes now, have had dozens in the past and have ridden every hydraulic brake system known to man. A cyclocross drop bar bike is not a mountain bike and trust me on skinny tires in dicey conditions, modulation and feel is absolutely critical.

    Despite that mine failed I still represent that the SRAM hydraulic road system was far and away the best CX braking system setup I have ever ridden and I've raced every cross bike configuration known to man since the early 90s, in MTB events, over 20 CX seasons, road races, gravel grinders, mud, ice, snow, rain and sub zero temperatures included.

  18. #93
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    A brake is a brake, and thats it, nothing more to it, I judge a brake for its performance. I'm a "professional wrench" too, but i wrench hydraulic systems costing hundreds of thousands of dollars instead, and I have zero units not working 100% when I'm done wrenching. I'm also a machinist so I could easily build all this **** myself. I build my bikes from the ground up, for myself.

    The last working avid brake was the juicy 7, which was designed by formula.

    I ride my bikes on the road, in all conditions, every day, and these days its mostly ice and snow. Modulation and feel is critical to me too, perhaps even more critical since my life depends on it, power is important too, very important. But power without control is useless and dangerous. At least my bb7s are just as good as my formulas in all aspects, and those are hard to beat. Yes the shimanos I had, had a (slightly) more smooth feel, but that was only because they ultimately lacked power. But then again I set up my bb7s myself since I don't exactly allow people to fiddle with my bikes, nor trust them doing their job right at all. If you want something done right you have to do it yourself. even bikes, especially bikes. imo. ymmv of course.

    What I think is odd is that even when this product failed, its still regarded as a good product. Would it have had to explode and take someones eye out for it to be a bad product? I'm just not seeing how this can be regarded as anything but, well, not so good. but thats just me.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  19. #94
    little mad riding hood
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    What I think is odd is that even when this product failed, its still regarded as a good product. Would it have had to explode and take someones eye out for it to be a bad product? I'm just not seeing how this can be regarded as anything but, well, not so good. but thats just me.
    so from your sig line you're already coming at this thread from a point of contention so thing one: why would I assume that you're willing to meet me halfway on this discussion.

    thing 2 over two dozen CX racers who rode the SRAM hydraulics (whether they had them fail or not) have said the same thing. For 'cross racing, the SRAM hydros were hands down the best braking system they had ever ridden.

    Hydraulics are coming for 'cross and they are desperately needed. Cable discs just are not as powerful, the pads do not wear properly for 'cross racing conditions as they are not self-centering (the heavy mud / grit and super hard punchy repeated braking from 20mph to walking pace over and over and over again through the dozens of corners per lap will lead to pads failing within one lap as happened at Kentucky last year)

    so again, I submit: if you have not ridden a cyclocross bike with the various brake systems in all conditions, you really don't have a basis for comparison. Note that this does not equal me saying "you don't know what you're talking about". You simply do not have the specific knowledge in this niche area to understand why cable brakes, and BB7 in specific, aren't well received in 'cross. They work fine as long as it's dry, which is 90% of the season in Colorado, but the minute our sandy, gritty clay gets wet they WILL fail due to pad wear, and rapidly at that.

    and yes, compared to the SRAM hydros the BB7s feel like crap despite being readjusted and inspected for cable stretch.

  20. #95
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    How are people going with getting replacement mechanicals???

    My bikes been at the shop since late Dec and every time I call it's *sram will get stock any day now*. Tempted to retrieve my bike and take the risk.

    Melbourne, Australia.

    Edit: Aww crap, dealer has removed hydro so no point retrieving bike as it's brakeless. Eta of replacements still unknown
    Last edited by jmpow2; 01-23-2014 at 10:44 PM.

  21. #96
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    My interim mechanical kit arrived at my LBS earlier this week. I may just keep riding my other bike and wait for the new hydros to come in a few months instead of rebuilding, stripping and rebuilding again.
    There's only two things in life (but I forget what they are). - John Hiatt

  22. #97
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    Update: Still no sign of mechanicals... *maybe next week* is the current message from the distributor :-(

  23. #98
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    Mine showed up at the LBS last week. BUT..... when they went to install them the brake cable isn't long enough to go through the Crux frame and does not reach the rear calliper. So now the LBS is trying to search for a tandem cable which is long enough... Not Happy

  24. #99
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    I ended up buying a Crux Evo. I really like the bike but want to replace the Axis 2.0 wheels for something lighter. I would like clincher or tubeless. I would like to drop some weight of the wheelset. The Roval Rapide CLX 40 look incredible, but they have a pretty incredible price as well. Stan's Alpha 340 Disc seems like a pretty good option, and the price is right. What else is out there that you would recommend?

  25. #100
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    Stan's Iron Cross.
    There's only two things in life (but I forget what they are). - John Hiatt

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