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  1. #1
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    New question here. Tricross vs Cyclocross (Specialized)

    I know that not too long ago Specialized categorized Tricross bikes as Cyclocross bikes but recently they were put into their own category on the Specialized website, I went to my local LBS and was helped by a really cool guy and we decided on a Tricross Sport Triple for me, on the LBS' website, it was still categorized as a Cyclocross bike, but I intend on using it as a full-on Cyclocross bike, i.e. I am going to find really rough and rugged trails to test myself - and it - on, my biggest concern about this though is that is a Tricross a qualified Cyclocross bike? I *want* a Cyclocross bike, not something lesser or more fit for roads-only. Thanks for helping me out.

  2. #2
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    The Tri Cross was their only Cross bike a couple of years ago. They came out with the Crux to offer a more sleak and race orientated bike. It is a true Cross bike with the ability to be a touring bike or a Cross race bike. If you are worried about it just get the Crux.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flucod View Post
    The Tri Cross was their only Cross bike a couple of years ago. They came out with the Crux to offer a more sleak and race orientated bike. It is a true Cross bike with the ability to be a touring bike or a Cross race bike. If you are worried about it just get the Crux.
    The significant price difference though.

  4. #4
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    The one tricross specification that tends to disqualify it from being a true cyclocross race design is the 440mm chainstay length. The long CS are more appropriate for a touring bike and would make for a slow turning CX race bike. I ams sure many people have use tricross for CX racing, not saying it cannot work but just that if you are buying new with the intention of racing you might as well get the right tool in the first place.

  5. #5
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    Well I am more concerned about whether or not it can take a beating like a CX bike should.

    Help me out here:

    Specialized Bicycle Components

    or

    Giant TCX 2 - Bicycles and gear for every type of riding - Giant, Santa Cruz, Diamondback, Raleigh, Felt, Fox & more

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  7. #7
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    The tricross has an aluminum fork which I've never understood. Take that into consideration and it's way overpriced.

    As far as I know, no one's ever been unhappy with a crosscheck. That said, they make better commuters than cx racing bikes.

    Don't know anything about Giants, but it has an aluminum fork and low end components too.

    Out of those 3, I'd say crossheck or browse this forum for one of the many threads about advice on which bike to buy. Lots of good ideas there from brands you've probably never heard of.

  8. #8
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    It should take a beating with no problem. Like GrayJay said, their Crux is for cyclocross racing. The geometry of the Crux would actually be closer to a road bike than the one that you are looking at. This one would be perfect for riding trails and gravel roads.

    If I was going to buy a cyclocross bike at this point (oh that's right, I just did), I would get one with disc brakes. With the Tricross I would probably get the Elite Steel Disc Triple, being a fan of steel. But I would also rather have a double than a triple.

  9. #9
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    THe frame and components of a CX race bike are not much more rugged than an equivalent level road bike. Materials & frame tube deminsions used for CX are more similar to a road bike than a MTB. A typical road bike frame of decent quality would survive CX conditions fine, just likely that the road frame would not have the frame clearance needed for running slightly wider CX tires.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrayJay View Post
    THe frame and components of a CX race bike are not much more rugged than an equivalent level road bike. Materials & frame tube deminsions used for CX are more similar to a road bike than a MTB. A typical road bike frame of decent quality would survive CX conditions fine, just likely that the road frame would not have the frame clearance needed for running slightly wider CX tires.
    ah i see, i didn't know that, btw this is going to be my first bike, so i am extremely critical and indecisive about it, i use a bike at work but it isn't mine (company bike), and it is a hybrid... i've fallen in love with the CX sport, i've been influenced to believe that buying from a LBS would be a better choice than getting a bike from an online distributor, personally i'd want a Motobecane Fantom Cross or the Nashbar CX-1, but as a first bike is it okay to buy from an online distributor? I know nothing about repairing them, while I intend on learning, but that isn't something that can be done overnight. And what would LBS act like if i took my bike in for repairs with them knowing it is a online exclusive?

    Thanks for all of your help and for all of the useful info.

    edit:
    Nashbar CX1 Cyclocross Bike - Cyclocross Bikes and Frames

    the bike.
    Last edited by Seasonal; 04-17-2013 at 03:18 PM.

  11. #11
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    As a fellow recent noob, the value I have gotten out of my LBS has been immense. I've had multiple little issues I needed help with and they have fixed every one. I have a service package with them that comes with buying the bike there, and it is awesome to know that if something is making a noise or I simply have a question that I can bring it in and they will work on it.

    With that said,if you can only afford the online distributor option, then do it, and just be diligent with your research and such.

  12. #12
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    If you dont have a strong background in bike mechanics (and a collection of bike specific tools) you would probably do well to work with a knowlegeble LBS, test-ride multiple bikes, get sized and fit to the bike properly and have the shop available to help with performing an initial post break-in tune-up. Dont expect a LBS to provide similar level of assistance with a bike sourced online. Shopping for last-year envintory closouts, you can often find great deals at LBS competitive with mail-order.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrayJay View Post
    If you dont have a strong background in bike mechanics (and a collection of bike specific tools) you would probably do well to work with a knowlegeble LBS, test-ride multiple bikes, get sized and fit to the bike properly and have the shop available to help with performing an initial post break-in tune-up. Dont expect a LBS to provide similar level of assistance with a bike sourced online. Shopping for last-year envintory closouts, you can often find great deals at LBS competitive with mail-order.
    Guerciotti Cross Force Sram Rival Cyclocross Bike 54cm Blue White

    what do you think of this, is it a good value?

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    I gave up on LBS due to the lack of experience. The local shops are mainly Bike Barn (Welcome - Bike Barn - Houston, Texas:) and they typically hire high school kids. These kids have yet to prove they know jack about cylocross bikes. All they know is the Trek or Specialized Catalog front to back. I tend to stick with Online retailers to save the 80% markup applied by LBS.
    Hammerheadbikes.com

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRealKTrain View Post
    I gave up on LBS due to the lack of experience. The local shops are mainly Bike Barn (Welcome - Bike Barn - Houston, Texas:) and they typically hire high school kids. These kids have yet to prove they know jack about cylocross bikes. All they know is the Trek or Specialized Catalog front to back. I tend to stick with Online retailers to save the 80% markup applied by LBS.
    Yea the thing I am concerned about with Online Distributors is not being able to try out sizes of bikes, and I don't know how the customer service is.

  16. #16
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    If the LBS is competent and giving you good service then they deserve your business so that they can stay around. Bike fit is important and having somebody knowledgeable set the bike up right will make a difference.
    You might want to reconsider the CX bike though, based on your initial comment about rugged trails you may be better served with a 29er hardtail if you are primarily riding dirt and are not planning to race CX.
    2009 Redline Conquest Pro, 2008 Trek Fuel Ex8
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    Yes I spent too much on bikes.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowJoeCrow View Post
    If the LBS is competent and giving you good service then they deserve your business so that they can stay around. Bike fit is important and having somebody knowledgeable set the bike up right will make a difference.
    You might want to reconsider the CX bike though, based on your initial comment about rugged trails you may be better served with a 29er hardtail if you are primarily riding dirt and are not planning to race CX.
    I plan on doing CX races most definitely, but only after I get back into shape, the reason I say tough and rugged trails is because I intend on commuting and using it at work, and about 20% of the land at work is pretty rough, while the rest is pretty smooth.

  18. #18
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    I rode a TriCross Sport disc and really liked it, mostly. I thought the ride was nice, and the position was comfortable, but I thought that for 1,300 bucks it should have better than an aluminum fork and Sora components.

    Plusses were that it was a cool orange color, and the frame looked nice with the internally routed cables.

    The BB5 (I think) disk brakes did not stop well at all, and the bar top levers were nearly useless.

    Maybe at 3 or 400 less it would be a nice bike, but IMO it's a poor value for the money they want for it.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by StuntmanMike View Post
    I rode a TriCross Sport disc and really liked it, mostly. I thought the ride was nice, and the position was comfortable, but I thought that for 1,300 bucks it should have better than an aluminum fork and Sora components.

    Plusses were that it was a cool orange color, and the frame looked nice with the internally routed cables.

    The BB5 (I think) disk brakes did not stop well at all, and the bar top levers were nearly useless.

    Maybe at 3 or 400 less it would be a nice bike, but IMO it's a poor value for the money they want for it.
    Ah okay, I guess I'll just go with the Tricross Expert Double then, I wasn't really into the disc brake thing anyways, I mean, they do sound nice, but also they do sound like a bit of a hassle.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seasonal View Post
    Ah okay, I guess I'll just go with the Tricross Expert Double then, I wasn't really into the disc brake thing anyways, I mean, they do sound nice, but also they do sound like a bit of a hassle.
    I love disks on my MTB's, and they have been completely trouble and maint free, but it seems that road disks are nowhere near that level yet. Maybe in a few years when they get hydro disks for road perfected.

    I will say that the cantilever bikes on the Ridley I bought are terrible. I mostly have to stop with the rear, because the fork judders like mad if I use the front too heavy. Which is a big adjustment, as my braking technique with disks leans heavily on the front.

    V brakes or different canti's are in my future.

  21. #21
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    I guess I got lucky with my cantis because I hear this so often. The cantis on my CAADX tiagra stop the bike not quite as well but nearly as well as the discs on my mountain bike, and don't do the front fork shudder in any way. I've literally never experienced it and I've put quite a few miles on the bike. Have you asked your LBS how to reduce/eliminate that? Considering my lower/mid level cross bike doesn't do it at all, I have to imagine a fix wouldn't be too difficult.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by LTT777 View Post
    I guess I got lucky with my cantis because I hear this so often. The cantis on my CAADX tiagra stop the bike not quite as well but nearly as well as the discs on my mountain bike, and don't do the front fork shudder in any way. I've literally never experienced it and I've put quite a few miles on the bike. Have you asked your LBS how to reduce/eliminate that? Considering my lower/mid level cross bike doesn't do it at all, I have to imagine a fix wouldn't be too difficult.
    I wish my canti experience was like yours! Maybe it's just an adjustement, perhaps I need to toe the pads in a little more than they are.

    From what I've read though, I think the real culprit is the fact that the cable guide only hangs down an inch from the top of the head tube, leaving a good 4" of cable before the center pull.

    I'm hoping the shop will be helpful with this. They adjusted my shift levers for me with no problem, so hopefully they'll be willing to look at this issue as well.

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