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  1. #1
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    Trek CrossRip Elite

    Does anyone own a Trek Cross Rip Elite? I am thinking of buying one but I cannot find one in any bike shop so I would like to have some input regarding this bike.

    Thanks!

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    What do you plan on using it for?
    It's more of a commuter bike that a cyclocross bike.

  3. #3
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    Mostly for paved rail trails/ green ways and when vacationing on trails that are paved and stone dust.

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    Then it, along with a Specialized Tri Cross....would be a good bike for you.

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    You like this more than the Trek? I liked the fork clearance on the Trek and it can accommodate a 29 inch wheel, not that I would be considering switching.

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    The CrossRip seems really nice for the money. Components are a little low end but the frame and fork along with the massive tire clearance open up a lot of possibilities down the road.
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    Both take "29" wheels....a 29 wheel is the same as a 700 road wheel.
    I don't " like" either of them...as in they are pretty much the same bikes...pretty good lower priced, commuter/ path bikes.
    Either will be fine for what you want to do with it.
    Don't over think it. You obviously like it...buy it and ride it.

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    The crossrip elite is pretty killer. I would not use it for cross racing, as the geo is a bit relaxed. But the component spec for the money is not bad. The hayes brakes are nice looking and work extremely well(huge upgrade from the bb5's on the base model). The carbon fork is a bit flexy, which is nice on this style of bike as you are looking more for comfort than speed. I have put about 20 miles on one and it is a fun utilitarian bike that just likes to be ridden.

  9. #9
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    It is between the Specialized Elite and the Trek but they are virtually the same bike.
    I will go with the Trek since the geometry is a little better suited to my size.

    How is the shifting on this bike? I know this setup is not the best but I do not want
    to spend a ton of money since my main ride is a FS
    Superfly.

    Thanks!

  10. #10
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    Cool looking bike

    Looks like the big 3 are beginning to acknowledge the gravel-multi terrain market. Consider buying the bike from a shop that offers free or discounted tune ups/service and have them zero the shifting in for you. A lot of peoples shifting problems are due to technique. Youll figure it out.

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    That is good advice, as well as keeping the drive train clean.

    The only thing I am really uncertain about are the tires. They appear to be real road tires and although I will be riding mostly on pavement, it will be paved rail trails so the pavement is lumpy and rough.

    I was thinking of asking them to change them out with some fast rolling/cyclocross, small knobby tires.

    Advice would be greatly appreciated!

  12. #12
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    There are a number of all terrain/CX

    tires out there. I really like the 35c Clement MSO CX all terrain tire.

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    Guys I'm new here and a total noob so bear with me.

    I placed an order for a 50cm Elite on Xmas Eve, I'm 5'9" with a 30.5" inseam.

    The LBS had a 54cm std CrossRip that I test rode and as soon as I sat on it the salesman said It looked long for me. He looked at the frame specs and compared them to the standard road bike and found that the 54cm model had a 56.8cm top tube length(the 50 has a 54.6cm length). After riding the CrossRip he put me on a really nice Domane 2.0 which measured a true 54cm and the fit was much better. The Tiagra components and compact double on the Domane really convinced me to go for the Elite model even though I think the flat black looks better.

    If the new Sora components feel half as good as the Tiagra on the Domane I'll be happy. I thought the 2300 stuff on the std bike felt nice compared to some of the crap ive ridden in the past.

    I'm a bit nervous about the tires too but I'm going to give them a chance and wear em out before deciding on something else.

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    The new sora is a world better than last years. And Bike fit is a huge debate and many people have opinions and ideas that make sense. I prefer the long and low aproach... which can be achieved on either size that you pick. But the smaller size(50) will make you feel a bit more in control and promote power moves and be a bit more lively. But you may want to swap the stem to get yourself a bit longer and lower. The 54 may feel a bit more stable and apear to be a better fit with less seat post protruding, but with the sloping top tube there is goig to be a bit of post sticking out to achieve proper fit. Fit is a very personal thing. so let the sales man know how you are feeling.

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    I picked up the bike today and couldn't be happier. After riding both the 54 and 50 I chose the 50 Elite. The smaller frame just felt more nimble and stable under low speed conditions and didnt seem to give up any stability at speed.

    The Elite is a step up from the standard CrossRip in every way. I could tell very little difference between the new Sora components and the Tiagra on the Domane I test road previously. The Hayes brakes are very smooth and stopped every bit as good or better than the BB5 brakes on the standard model.

    The only negative I can think of so far is the seat is hard and hurts my pelvis a bit. Might havde to change the seat.

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    i just ordered my 50 cm cross rip elite a few days ago.

    i wish the top tube was an actual 50cm and not a 54 cm.

    but once i get the bike and see.

    i will know if i goofed.
    can't really do anything else though,
    since that is smallest cross bike model with discs.

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    The size should not be a problem, you have some adjustment in the cockpit length with the saddle, and if you cannot get enough adjustment there, the stem could be changed.

    Let me know how you like the bike and please post a photo!

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    i am small and ride a 52 cm road bike

  19. #19
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    Did the bike shop fit you?

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    4cm is only 1.57 inches. Like mentioned above there should be no problem getting the bike to fit you.

    Heres a couple pics from yesterdays 8 mile ride. Couldn't be happier.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek CrossRip Elite-img_02232.jpg  

    Trek CrossRip Elite-img_02242.jpg  


  21. #21
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    The bike looks great and so does the scenery, I really miss Wilmington!!

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    i have over 40 years race experience.
    i can even ride something a little big.
    but i wanted something i could really ride and handle with ease
    and i wanted disc brakes more than anything

    those pix make me think the bike will be just fine.
    it is small
    and just has a long-er top tube than other/standard cross race bikes
    which can be fixed with a short stem.
    if i even need a change at all.

    eye candy. now even more anxious.

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    Thanks, its nice when it's not 100 degrees out!

    Bike rode great, it had rained yesterday and was pretty sloppy.The bike handled the rougest gravel road section I could find with ease. It's all sand here so bigger tires will be a must for any real single track. I'm also 210lb so I'm no lightweight.

  24. #24
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    You will be fine, if need be it will amount to minor adjustments, you will love the bike!

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    how is the pedal / front tire overlap ?
    i am hoping the longer top tube is the blessing in disguise
    to avoiding tip of shoes touching front tire in cornering

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    I am about 215 and I was thinking the stock tires are strictly road tires and I was thinking of having them changed to a mini knobby tire.

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    I'll admit the longer top tube may make this bike a bit easier to ride offroad. I notice that I really have to shift my weight back on this bike when i get in anything soft. The next frame size up may be a little easier to lighten the front tire up.

    I have clipped my toe on the front tire a couple times. But it was in slow speed turning situations where I had my foot too far forward on the pedal.

    I'm now considering bigger tires as wel but not sure on a knobbie. I was thinking something like the schwalbe marathons might work well.

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    and you are 5 feet 9 inches ?
    i have owned small road bikes
    where my shoes hit the front tire cornering
    and made for hair raising few seconds.

  29. #29
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    It does not seem logical a bikes design would allow your feet to contact the front wheel when turning?

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    i did discuss with the shop
    a additional set of 29'er tubeless rims and tire set for this bike

  31. #31
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    So with larger wheels, your feet would be closer?

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    it was very common in smaller frames

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    Yes 5'9" with a 30/30.5 inseam.

    When I clipped the tire was maneuvering from a stop. This did not happen while pedaling in motion.

    My foot was also too far forward on the pedal.

    Think more about this I was not seated, I had my right foor on the ground and was taking off from a stop.

  34. #34
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    if you move the crank/pedal to the say 3 o'clock-towards front of bike position.
    can you move your shoe clipped into pedal
    and get it to touch the front tire if you turn the bars ?

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    I have stock pedals with no clips. as long as my foot is in the "clipped position" my toe/foot will not touch.

    I am a novice!!!

  36. #36
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    Yes, you foot should not reach, unless your bike is 3 sizes too small!

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    i guess the point is moot,
    since my 50cm bike was already ordered and is on the way as we speak.
    and there is no other size that will fit.
    only bigger frames...eeek!

    those photos make me anxious.
    i am sure i will be happy.

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    hopefully this puts your mind to rest
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek CrossRip Elite-img_02252.jpg  


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    are the cranks 170's ?

    the reason for 29'er wheel set
    was to order a bontrager tubeless ready wheel set that the discs can transfer over to

    i think 29'er and 700c are nearly the same size rim

    but need to see what size tire can fit in frame and forks before that step

    . i am super excited to get my new bike now.

    it's like Christmas and stuff.

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    I get 6.75" on the crank which is 172mm or so.

    The wheels are 622x15. I see max recomended width is 32 which is whats on it.

    According to Trek 1.8" wide tires will fit inside the frame/fork. Thats what a 45mm width tire???

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    my upgraded wheel set
    will be tubeless
    so not sure what width/tire i will be able to get on there.

    i am not going to see my new bike til next year.

    ha

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by lunna View Post
    i guess the point is moot,
    since my 50cm bike was already ordered and is on the way as we speak.
    and there is no other size that will fit.
    only bigger frames...eeek!

    those photos make me anxious.
    i am sure i will be happy.
    You see, this is why the top tube needs to be the lenghth it is. I was looking at the geometry of the Specialized Cyclocross and the top tube length is about one inch less than the Trek.

    The longer TP equates to a longer wheelbase and a better ride.

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    So I spent some time reasearching seats/seat adjustment and really dialing in the seat position. I had the seat much too high and forward. I wasnt even sitting on my "sit bones" and my hips were rocking. So, I moved the seat down and back and so far the front end seems much lighter without my weight being carried on the bars as much.

    The last time I spent any significant time on a bicycle was before I got my drivers license, I'm 36 now. Even then all I've ever ridden is BMX style and mountain bikes. The road bike aspect is completely new to me. On top of that this is my first "fitted" bike. You guys take that into account when you hear me talk about this bike, especially offroad. I live on the coast where it's all soft sand, I'm 210lb and the bike has small 32c tires on it. Even mountain bikes are tough to ride under these conditions. I had several front tire wash outs venturing offroad. Eventually though it all came to me, I can't "ride the front tire" like a big tire bike(if that makes sense). I really had to pick the front tire up over the smallest obstacles compared what I'm used to.

    One other thing I'll admit is I may have shortish arms which could be another reason the 50 felt better for me.

    rickcin, so do you have a CrossRip on order yet??

  44. #44
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    The tires that come with the Cross Rip and generally for the road and the bike is considered a Cyclocross. I might ask the dealer to swap out the tires when he gets my bike so I get a tire that will function well on asphalt or stone dust. With a mini knobby tire I could then adjust to the differnt terrain. A higher pressure when cycling on asphalt and then less pressure on unpaved trails.

    You should have asked your bike shop to set the seat height and check your riding position. This is all part of the fit and part of their service and if you feel they are not capable of doing this, then stop in a better bike shop and I am sure they would be more than happy to help you.

    When I picked up my FS Superfly a few weeks ago, I brought my cleats in and they set me all up, adusted the saddle height, checked my position in the cockpit and reviewed daily maintainence items with me. I just if I just took the bike and left they may not have offered any assistance. My recommendation would be for you to have a knowledgeable person double check your current set-up! Minor adjustmaents could make for a huge difference in comfort and performance.

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    I agree, when I picked the bike up the salesman I ordered the bike from wasn't there. I was in a rush to ride it and another fellow quickly adjusted the seat and I left. I'll be going back and will most likely buy another seat too. The stock seat is too narrow for me.

    This shop has an excellent reputation around town and I'm sure Brian, the salesman, will take care of me.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    So I spent some time reasearching seats/seat adjustment and really dialing in the seat position. I had the seat much too high and forward. I wasnt even sitting on my "sit bones" and my hips were rocking. So, I moved the seat down and back and so far the front end seems much lighter without my weight being carried on the bars as much.

    The last time I spent any significant time on a bicycle was before I got my drivers license, I'm 36 now. Even then all I've ever ridden is BMX style and mountain bikes. The road bike aspect is completely new to me. On top of that this is my first "fitted" bike. You guys take that into account when you hear me talk about this bike, especially offroad. I live on the coast where it's all soft sand, I'm 210lb and the bike has small 32c tires on it. Even mountain bikes are tough to ride under these conditions. I had several front tire wash outs venturing offroad. Eventually though it all came to me, I can't "ride the front tire" like a big tire bike(if that makes sense). I really had to pick the front tire up over the smallest obstacles compared what I'm used to.

    One other thing I'll admit is I may have shortish arms which could be another reason the 50 felt better for me.

    rickcin, so do you have a CrossRip on order yet??
    Sorry, I missed your question. No, I have not ordered the Cross Rip yet, going to do so lated this month. Going to order 2 bikes since my wife want the Cannondale Synapse, so hopefully I can get a decent deal, especially since I want different tires on my bike.

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    Did 14 miles today around Greenfield Lake in Wilmington. No offroad but I went down a set of brick steps and did much curb hopping and travelling some rough trashy roads. Bike is tough as nails and I love the disc brakes! Say what you want about the tires but I've run over glass and all kinds of winter debree. Supposedly these hardcase ultimate tires are very puncture resistant. They do make them up to 45c I think.

    The seat adjustment helped tremendously! Not only in comfort but also helped exactly as id hoped with rideability. This bike is everything that I was looking for. It IS NOT that dainty, max effort road bike. It is everything they say it is.

    One thing I wanted to mention was the shifting and gearing, specifically the difference between the standard CrossRip and the Elite version. The standard model with its triple and 8 speed was not as smooth and seemed to suffer from cross chaining and made noise in certain gear combos. This could have been the bike needing an adjustment, operator error, or a combo of both. Either way, the Elite version has been flawless. I'm extremely happy with the ratios, shifting etc etc.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek CrossRip Elite-img_02272.jpg  


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    thank you for the photos.

    i can't wait to get my bike.

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    No problem, post up some pics when you can!!

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    rickcin, have you thought about what tires you were going to upgrade to? The stock wheels "technically" won't allow anything bigger, although I've heard people say they have ran 35c tires on 15mm inner wheels. My primary concern is puncture resistance, especially with tires this small. Very few if any offroad knobbies offer the level of protection the stock tires or the Schwalbes I mentioned.

    I think the solution is to get a second wheel set like lunna is doing. I wouldn't be nearly concerned with flats/rim damage with something like 38c-45c tires. I'd love to have two sets of wheels/tires to switch back and forth depending on conditions.

    One thing about this bike is it doesn't have quick release wheels. I don't know whether that's something I need or not. Thoughts?

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    rickcin, have you thought about what tires you were going to upgrade to? The stock wheels "technically" won't allow anything bigger, although I've heard people say they have ran 35c tires on 15mm inner wheels. My primary concern is puncture resistance, especially with tires this small. Very few if any offroad knobbies offer the level of protection the stock tires or the Schwalbes I mentioned.

    I think the solution is to get a second wheel set like lunna is doing. I wouldn't be nearly concerned with flats/rim damage with something like 38c-45c tires. I'd love to have two sets of wheels/tires to switch back and forth depending on conditions.

    One thing about this bike is it doesn't have quick release wheels. I don't know whether that's something I need or not. Thoughts?
    I would rather not have another set of wheels, especially since I have a FS bike. I would much rather have cyclocross tires for the trails that are part pavement and part dirt or stone dust. Also, a different tire will add to the suspension of the bike and provide a better ride.

    I like;
    Clement MSO CX
    Vittoria CrossXG
    Continental Ciclo X King

    However my favorite is the Bontrager CX 3 which is hard case and has 120tpi

    The wheels do not have the quick release feature???? If not, I wonder why and hope that a member could explain why, there must be a logical reason!!

    Rick

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    Evidently there may some issues with the strength of the quick release and disc brakes??? If its a matter of strength or just Trek being overkill safety wise I'm okay with it. Honestly the arrangement Trek has on this bike looks really easy, all i need is an allen wrench.

    check these links

    Broken Fork

    Disk brake and Quick Release problem

    Brandon

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    Evidently there may some issues with the strength of the quick release and disc brakes??? If its a matter of strength or just Trek being overkill safety wise I'm okay with it. Honestly the arrangement Trek has on this bike looks really easy, all i need is an allen wrench.

    check these links

    Broken Fork

    Disk brake and Quick Release problem

    Brandon
    Wow, this is crazy, I never knew such a problem existed!! Now you have me really thing about my FS Trek Superfly which has great stopping power, I guess perhaps too good!

    So I guess the bottom line is to easy on the brakes, when possible and make sure the skewers are tight? I gotta believe the mountain bike I ride is made tougher and meant to be ridded harder than I will ever do.

    I was never a fan of rim brakes and have always liked discs and this is one reason I favor the Trek Cross Rip over other Cyclocross bikes.

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    I couldn't be happier with the brakes, they stop extremely well. It almost feels like a motorcycle to me but without any front end dive under hard braking. The biggest differences I've noticed is the consistency and zero fade. Next would be the silence in all conditions, ie no squeaking or pulsing when wet.

    To me, this is a tough ass road bike with a carbon fork that I can treat it like the urban brawler type bikes im used to riding. I've ridden this bike at work with it's gravel roads with rock the size of small boulders and puddles 8" deep. I road it in the city dodging traffic and the brakes stopped my 210lb with authority to avoid a car turning right into an intersection I was going to cross.

    As tough as this bike is one of the things I've been most impressed with is how fast and effortlessly this bike rolls. It does not pedal much harder than the Domane 2.0 I rode. I have NEVER covered ground on a bicycle like this. It's still light and doesn't work the crap out of you!

    I know I've seen monstercross/cyclocross bike on here with discs and skewers. Maybe with the carbon fork Trek felt like a solid axle would be beneficial?.?.?

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    I am sure I will love the bike and certain that Trek has designed it properly so there will not be any issues with the bike.

    How do you like the tires when off road? My thought was to ask the bike shop to change out the tires rather than to start riding with the stock tires. What are you thoughts on this?

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    My opinion? Ride it. Enjoy it and wear them out.

    I have not once felt like I need a more aggressive tread or lacked traction anywhere. The only issue ive ran into is when I really get into the soft stuff the front tire washes out. In my limited experience tread pattern wont do squat for this, the real cure is bigger tires. The only trouble with that is the wheels will only support 32mm tires.

    My only concern is that bigger wheels/tires may weight this bike down and numb the handling a bit. Thats why I think biding your(our) time and getting a spare set of wheels to try out tires is a smart move. Big puncture resistant tires are heavy, there are much lighter tires but will they be any more puncture resistant than the one that are on it???

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    These are the tires that come on the bike( the ultimate version in 32c.)


    Bontrager: H5 700C (Model #09390)

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    Yes, I looked at them many times, on line and I guess they will be okay. I just thought a mini knobby like the Clement that comes standard on the GT Cyclocross. Just thought it might be better for the dirt and stone dust trails, just a little more bite on soft material, but that is just my thinking.

    I Think I am going with your recommendation, just take what comes with the bike and wear them out and have a blast.

    Thanks - Rick

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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    Both take "29" wheels....a 29 wheel is the same as a 700 road wheel.
    I don't " like" either of them...as in they are pretty much the same bikes...pretty good lower priced, commuter/ path bikes.
    Either will be fine for what you want to do with it.
    Don't over think it. You obviously like it...buy it and ride it.
    Just out of curiosity, what Cross bike do you like?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    I picked up the bike today and couldn't be happier. After riding both the 54 and 50 I chose the 50 Elite. The smaller frame just felt more nimble and stable under low speed conditions and didnt seem to give up any stability at speed.

    The Elite is a step up from the standard CrossRip in every way. I could tell very little difference between the new Sora components and the Tiagra on the Domane I test road previously. The Hayes brakes are very smooth and stopped every bit as good or better than the BB5 brakes on the standard model.

    The only negative I can think of so far is the seat is hard and hurts my pelvis a bit. Might havde to change the seat.
    BTW, when you start looking at new saddles, if you haven't bought one already, check out the WTB saddles. Many riders love them and it comes standard on the Salsa, Fargo 2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    BTW, when you start looking at new saddles, if you haven't bought one already, check out the WTB saddles. Many riders love them and it comes standard on the Salsa, Fargo 2.
    Thanks, I ended up buying a Serfas Mx-2 Dorado from my LBS. I get a discount on items for a certain period of time after buying the bike from them. So far the seat seems to be a major improvement. It's a performance comfort seat and is a bit wider than the stocker. I spent some more time nailing the seat position and feel like I finally nailed it after tilting the nose of the seat down a bit. The seat does have more cushion but it's not overly padded for those longer rides.

    So far I have put about 60 miles or so on the bike. The only things I've had to do is adjust the rear derailleur six clicks out and the front/rear brakes three clicks out each. At the end of the month I'll take it in for an adjustment/service.

    I ended up buying a well taken care of 93 Trek MultiTrack hybrid for 140 locally. The frame specs (all black steel) are nearly identical to the CrossRip and has 35c tires on it already. My plans are to switch to drop bars and modern controls. I may put a carbon fork and discs on the front. I'm trying to assemble a fleet of decent bikes for the entire family to ride, no point in having a bunch of crap bikes no one wants to ride!

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    I will take a look at the saddle your LBS sold you. I do usually end up changing the stock saddle that comes with the bike to better match up with my specific use of that bike.

    I did not order the bike yet, however I bought new shimano clipless pedals that I plan on having on the Trek. I love being clipped in, you become more of a part of the bike and have better control. Like driving a sports car with an automatic transmission, it would be a total waste, at least as far as I am concerned!

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    Real cars have three pedals!

    You've got me looking at pedals/shoes now. I'm looking at something like these:

    Shimano PD M530 SLX Trail Clipless Pedal > Components > Pedals, Cleats, Toe Clips, Straps > Pedals | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    OR these:

    Shimano XTR M985 Trail Pedal > Components > Pedals, Cleats, Toe Clips, Straps > Pedals | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    What do you think?

    What about shoes, any reccomendations??

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    That is too funny!!!! Your first ling are the new pedals I bought for the Cross Rip that I have not ordered yet!

    The reason I bought these is because I have the Shimnao PD-M647 pedals on my mountain bike and they are virtually the same ones as the PD M530, same mechanism just a slightly smaller surround.

    I love those pedals, they are so great, go with them and let me know how you do. Just make sure to practice will you will fall and not get hurt. I rode around on our lawn and I still fell a few times when out riding on a trail. I am totally hooked on being clipped in.

    Keep me posted!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    Real cars have three pedals!

    You've got me looking at pedals/shoes now. I'm looking at something like these:

    Shimano PD M530 SLX Trail Clipless Pedal > Components > Pedals, Cleats, Toe Clips, Straps > Pedals | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    OR these:

    Shimano XTR M985 Trail Pedal > Components > Pedals, Cleats, Toe Clips, Straps > Pedals | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    What do you think?

    What about shoes, any reccomendations??
    What interests you in those two pedals? I see they are basically the same thing, a standard SPD with a half cage around them. In my opinion, the half cage is useless. It adds weight, and provides no benefit. It isnt large enough to use as a platform. I think you need to go extreme one way or the other.
    Ride what the pros use:
    Shimano XTR PD-M980 Race Pedal > Components > Pedals, Cleats, Toe Clips, Straps > Pedals | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    or go full on cage:
    Shimano PD-M545 Pedals > Components > Pedals, Cleats, Toe Clips, Straps > Pedals | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop
    Hammerheadbikes.com

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    The full cage is what I have on my FS bike and it does offer full support as well as being able to pedal without being clipped in for those difficult times on single track.

    Shimano claims the reduced cage on the PD M-530 is for mud shedding while they claim it still offers support and some stability. You would also be able to make a short trip without having cleats on.

    The PD 530' weigh 455 grams

    The XTR M-987 weigh 398 grams and are $100 more than the 530's. For a CX bike, the weight difference is not a factor, at least in my opinion.
    Last edited by rickcin; 01-09-2013 at 06:44 AM.

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    The fact that I'm a total noob and never used clipless pedals is what interests me in these.

    I don't want a race version to be my first foray into the clipless pedal world and I don't want 2lb bricks for pedals on this bike either.

    Any good options for cleats in wide widths? Only ones I see are Shimano and they are $100 and up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    The fact that I'm a total noob and never used clipless pedals is what interests me in these.

    I don't want a race version to be my first foray into the clipless pedal world and I don't want 2lb bricks for pedals on this bike either.

    Any good options for cleats in wide widths? Only ones I see are Shimano and they are $100 and up.
    In my opinion, if you are using the pedals with cycling shoes as they were both designed, then threre is no need for larger platforms on the pedals. Common SPD or CrankBro pedals are perfect.
    If you are hopping on your bike to spin around the neighborhood with tennis shoes on, you would be fine on the same small SPD pedals.
    In my personal experience I found no extra benefit to the SPD with the surrounding platform. When clipped in, 95% of my shoe's support came from the clip/pedal mechanism, not the surrounding.

    As for shoes (which is what I assume you meant) in wide sizes at understandable prices, I'd check out Specialized Mid range shoes.
    Hammerheadbikes.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    The fact that I'm a total noob and never used clipless pedals is what interests me in these.

    I don't want a race version to be my first foray into the clipless pedal world and I don't want 2lb bricks for pedals on this bike either.

    Any good options for cleats in wide widths? Only ones I see are Shimano and they are $100 and up.
    I have a wide foot as well! I went to a LBS since the fellow said they could order them for me if they could not come up with store cleats to fit me. He tried a Specialized shoe since the fellow said they have a very wide toe box and he was correct. I left the store with the cleats and the cost was less than $100 and they are super comfortable, a great fit.

    I loved being clipped in, you feel like you are more of a part of the bike and seem to have better control, IMO!

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    That's what I've been told. One of the guys I talked to pointed out the fact that you can lift the rear of the bike with your feet during jumps which can save the rear tire/rim from damage etc.

    The only things I'm concerned about is falling and my left knee, which is in pretty bad shape. I've had to give up running because of it(not like I was a runner). I got into biking for the lower impact on the knees. I heard that some folks had issues with knee pain and some styles of pedals that didnt have enough "float".

    I'm going to be patient and go back up to the LBS and try some stuff. There I can physically touch and try things out. Only problem with that is I'm having trouble getting anything done because I've been riding all the time.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek CrossRip Elite-img_02432.jpg  

    Trek CrossRip Elite-img_02442.jpg  


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    how about small block eight?
    but if you plan to change the tires at a trek dealer, than give i would try out LT3.
    i had a pair which i really liked.
    didnt have a single flat on those, used them for ~10 months.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    That's what I've been told. One of the guys I talked to pointed out the fact that you can lift the rear of the bike with your feet during jumps which can save the rear tire/rim from damage etc.

    The only things I'm concerned about is falling and my left knee, which is in pretty bad shape. I've had to give up running because of it(not like I was a runner). I got into biking for the lower impact on the knees. I heard that some folks had issues with knee pain and some styles of pedals that didnt have enough "float".

    I'm going to be patient and go back up to the LBS and try some stuff. There I can physically touch and try things out. Only problem with that is I'm having trouble getting anything done because I've been riding all the time.
    Great photos, I guess they are from Wilmington?

    Glad you are doing plenty of riding, that is what it is all about, exercise, being out of doors and enjoying the scenery.

    You will love being clipped in. It is somewhat of a learning curve but you will get it and love it. I feel it puts less pressure on my body since the motion is more controlled and the tension and compression is always equal. It will become second nature.

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    Those pics are of the Cape Fear river in Carolina Beach. I posted a few more pics in the Singletrack photo thread too.

    It was beautiful all weekend here. I rode over at Wrightsville beach and put another 20 miles on the bike. On one circuit I averaged almost 16mph over 6.5 miles. I'm pretty proud of that fact considering I'm a noob. Everytime I ride I get stronger and faster. It also really helps to have a bike you really want to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    Those pics are of the Cape Fear river in Carolina Beach. I posted a few more pics in the Singletrack photo thread too.

    It was beautiful all weekend here. I rode over at Wrightsville beach and put another 20 miles on the bike. On one circuit I averaged almost 16mph over 6.5 miles. I'm pretty proud of that fact considering I'm a noob. Everytime I ride I get stronger and faster. It also really helps to have a bike you really want to ride.
    Sound like you are really enjoying yourself!

    Wish I could say the same, My new FS bike has been sitting in my utility room and all I can do is to look at it since the NY weather is not allowing me to ride.

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    Great to see some good information on the Crossrip. I plan on buying the base model because I really like the matte black color. Then, I am switching the drivetrain off of a broken bike onto the Crossrip. Will be a full build mix of 105 and Ultegra parts.
    Trek 69er SS (in progress), Trek Superfly, GT Force Carbon Expert, Trek Madone 6.2

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyitsmebob View Post
    Great to see some good information on the Crossrip. I plan on buying the base model because I really like the matte black color. Then, I am switching the drivetrain off of a broken bike onto the Crossrip. Will be a full build mix of 105 and Ultegra parts.
    Post pics when it's done. It sounds like a nice build.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

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    I work at a Trek shop and am conflicted with the Crossrip. Seeing so many other companies are unveiling high-end disc cross bikes and Trek seems like they just dipped their toe in the water with this bike. I was hoping to see a competitive disc cross bike, more like a Cronus CX with discs not a fitness bike with a drop bar. If you like the bike and it works for you thats great but I was hoping to see more from Trek. They better step it up next year, discs are just getting too popular to put off releasing a competitive bike.
    My motorcycle runs on infant blood

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    everything i was working on
    to get this bike.
    just did not transpire.

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    any other crossrip updates? Looking into this bike as well as a secondary fun bike

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    I ended up buying a Cannondale, got a good price on a left over and went with it since the components were much better than the Trek but does not have disc brakes.

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    Weight

    HI!

    I am considering buying a Crossrip.
    Can anyone tell me the weight of the crossrip / elite please, I cant find it online, and my dealer cant order the bike just to look at.

    Also I prefer the black color of the "normal" version to the Elite. How "bad" are the standard components, or how much better is the elite here? The thread does sound very much in favour of the elite components.

    Would it be feasible to update the components later, or would you say that makes no sense?

    Thanks so much,
    Thomas

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    I went with a Cannondale since it was a left over and the component group was about two levels better than the Trek and the price was slightly higher than the Trek.

    I am very happy with the bike! I think mine weights about 22 lbs and is a 58cm frame.

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    My Elite weighs 26lb and is a 50cm frame. I too prefer the black color, but having ridden both bikes the Elite does have the better components and is worth the very small price increase.

    Are there bikes out there with better components? Sure, from what I saw you either have to give up something (like the carbon fork and/or disc brakes) or pay significantly more. And those more expensive high end bikes are usually more competition oriented, something I have zero interest in. I bought this bike purely as a fitness and exploration bike. I also dont care for many of these overly extravagant color schemes many bikes have today. In my opinion both the standard and Elite version look great.

    I have ridden the hell out of this bike and have had ZERO issues or broken parts.

    Is it worth buying the standard model and upgrading? No, your money would be better spent elsewhere. Something like the Specialized Tricross comp disc compact would be nice and comes in black. But msrp is $1950.....

    I forgot to add that I've got a few add ons, hybrid spd/platform pedals, a small bag under the seat and a pocket on the top tube i use for my phone. I'm assuming these have added some weight, how much I dunno.
    Last edited by Clint Beastwood; 04-05-2013 at 09:19 PM. Reason: additional info

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    I went with the Cannondale to get the better drivetrain/shifter set since that is a very significant and interactive component on a bike.

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    Rick

    In my limited experience with the bikes i've rode and test rode at the LBS I just didn't see that much improvement with the ultra high end drivetrain/comps as some of you guys claim.

    Brakes are a very significant and interactive component on a bike too and I personally saw more of an improvement with disc brakes over traditional brakes than I did with more expensive comps and one more gear. Sometimes I think that folk get carried away with having to have the top of the line stuff and have to have the baddest bike on the block if you know what I mean.

    Did you ever get the brake chatter issue solved?

    To each is own. Like I said, it seems you have to give up something to get another in this class of bike unless you want to pay significantly more cash. Honestly, the only way you're going to get everything exactly the way you want is to build a bike yourself.

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    I am sure I would have been very happy with the CrossRipp and i would have ordered one had I not had the opportunity to get this Cannonade CX bike, for a great price.

    I am very happy with the bike and the bike shop. The brake chatter resolved itself, I guess the pads had to break in and I did give it a chance. The bike shop wanted me to immediately bring it back so they could take a look but now it is a non issue.

    The bike is great, shifting is very smooth, quiet and effortless, just what I was hoping for.I love the tires, they are highly rated for both road and trail, Schwalbe, Sammy Slicks and they are awesome, just what I was looking for. I am really liking this bike but it is my backup for when the trails are wet or muddy. My first love is my FS Trek XC bike however the Cannonade is a really nice bike and I am enjoying having two very different bikes, kind-of the best of both worlds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I am sure I would have been very happy with the CrossRipp and i would have ordered one had I not had the opportunity to get this Cannonade CX bike, for a great price.

    I am very happy with the bike and the bike shop. The brake chatter resolved itself, I guess the pads had to break in and I did give it a chance. The bike shop wanted me to immediately bring it back so they could take a look but now it is a non issue.

    The bike is great, shifting is very smooth, quiet and effortless, just what I was hoping for.I love the tires, they are highly rated for both road and trail, Schwalbe, Sammy Slicks and they are awesome, just what I was looking for. I am really liking this bike but it is my backup for when the trails are wet or muddy. My first love is my FS Trek XC bike however the Cannonade is a really nice bike and I am enjoying having two very different bikes, kind-of the best of both worlds.
    Hey guys I'm a noob looking for a little advice (cliffs at the bottom ). I have a Hardtail 29er MTB and am looking to get on something a little faster and more road appropriate, although I don't want a true road bike as a lot of the riding in my area has various types of terrain and I dont want to be constricted to just smooth pavement. Naturally I've come across cyclocross and it seems to be what I'm looking for.

    My LBS has a leftover cannondale CX that rickin picked up, and the crossrip. Because of what I've read in this thread I thought the cannondale would be a better buy due to better components. The salesman at my LBS instructed me that a true cyclocross bike has a gear set up a lot more like a mountain bike and wont be as fast as a bike like the cross rip, which he said isn't actually a cyclocross bike . Admittedly I'm not 100% sure what he was saying, but basically the road bikes have bigger gears and thus allow for the bikes to move much faster with less effort.

    Being a noob this is the first I've heard of this concept. Now knowing I don't want to get on a true roadbike, but definitely want to be able to move faster than I'm currently capable of on my MTB, would you guys suggest the crossrip over the cannondale? I would like to have the option to race cyclocross at some point in the future, but that is literally just a thought in my head and I'd hate to give up a lot of speed now for that option that I may never fulfill.

    My apologies for the ramble and thank you in advance for any insight.

    Cliffs: Is a true cyclocross bike going to be markedly slower than the crossrip to the point where it would warrant the crossrip purchase over a cyclocross bike when looking for speed?

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    I am not qualified to answer your question regarding which bike is faster. I guess it depends on the specific gear ratios and if you are referring to high end speed, I guess that would vary depending on where you were racing, the specific elevation changes?

    Certain gearing would benefit specific terrain conditions and Ido not have enough knowledge to be able to make a recommendation. I went with the Cannondale since several bike shops had told me the components were much better, specifically the Shimano 105 group that came with the Cannondale.

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    I looked up the specs on the bikes. Cannondale that Rick has uses a 46/36 double up front and a close ratio 12-28 10 speed cassette. The CrossRip Elite uses a 50/34 double up front and wide ratio mountain bike style 11-32 9 speed cassette. The standard CrossRip uses a 52/42/30 triple with a 12-26 8 speed cassette.

    Both the standard CrossRip and CrossRip Elite have a faster top gear and a lower low gear than the Cannondale. The standard CrossRip achieves this using the Triple crankset while the CrossRip Elite manages this with its wide ratio mountain bike style cassette out back.

    The Cannondale however with its close ratio gearing wont drop your cadence as much with each gear change. This also all may wash out being the Cannondale is lighter. The Cannondale is definitely the more race inspired bike. The CrossRip is more of a jack of all trades bike.



    Rick

    I'm shopping for a mountain bike now. You are right, these two style of bikes really are the best of both worlds.

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    What are you looking to buy, a hardtail or a full suspension?
    I do not know what single track riding is available near Wilmington.
    There are some great places in Asheville and next month we will be going to Virginia to bike in the Blue Ridge Mountain area.
    For mountain biking, I go with the 29 ers.

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    Great explanation regarding the gear differences between the two bikes!

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    Thank you guys both for your insight. I'm still not entirely sure which would be best suited for my desires, but from the information gathered here I'm pretty sure I can't go too far wrong with either one.

    I love how light the cannondale is along with the option to race cyclocross at some point (and that I'll be getting a solid discount on a 2012) but I also really like the crossrip having two sets of brake levers and that I was told it would likely be faster.

    I guess I have some thinking to do . Thank you guys again!

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    No problem. Honestly you can't go wrong either way, your usage will determine which bike is better suited for you.

    Rick

    I wasn't aware of these until a few days ago,

    Blue Clay Bike Park | Cape Fear SORBA | Wilmington, NC

    Brunswick Nature Park | Cape Fear SORBA | Wilmington, NC

    From what I understand Blue Clay cycle park has held Cyclocross events too.

    As far as a mountain bike I'm looking at 29er hardtails. Don't think I want to go straight to a full suspension bike. Especially considering I'm trying to build a stable of decent bikes for the entire family. I don't think a FS bike is going to pull any street duty.

    Been looking at the Trek Mamba and Cobia as well as others. I'm not stuck on Trek by any means but the bike shop closest to me is a big Trek dealer. They do deal with Cannondale and Giant too, so I'll be looking at those as well.

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    I have a 2013 Trek Mamba with upgrades at 27 pounds. Can't go wrong with it but if u have the budget go for the cobia. The amount of upgrades it has is better cost sufficient than upgrading the mamba. I spent almost 1k in upgrades when I could of put $2000 into a better spec'ed bike like the X-cal. Hope this makes sense =) Also looking at the crossrip elite for some urban riding since Spring Sales are popping up everywhere.

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    OMG, I think I may have found my next bike. I was looking for something very similar to the crossrip (Urban road riding bike that can take on a commute and abuse) Cyclocross came to mine because I love the "best of both worlds" concept but found this: Specialized Bicycle Components More for road use than mountain but comes with discs for those wet, muddy, seasons. They also have a tricross as well for more mountain trail use. What do you guys think? Currently it is on sale $1100 at my LBS.

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    I really liked my Cobia, it was a great bike for the money!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ncruz408 View Post
    OMG, I think I may have found my next bike. I was looking for something very similar to the crossrip (Urban road riding bike that can take on a commute and abuse) Cyclocross came to mine because I love the "best of both worlds" concept but found this: Specialized Bicycle Components More for road use than mountain but comes with discs for those wet, muddy, seasons. They also have a tricross as well for more mountain trail use. What do you guys think? Currently it is on sale $1100 at my LBS.
    Looks like a nice ride. Personally I would rather have the Tricross over it though, and I would take the CrossRip Elite over all but the Tricross comp disc compact. Unfortunately that bike has an msrp of $1950.

    My worry about the Secteur is that its a road bike with discs. How is it going to handle in crappy conditions let alone gravel roads and single track. It has 28c tires, personally I would want nothing less than 32c tires on it and I'm considering putting 35c tires on my CrossRip after yesterday at the mountain bike park I went to. In my opinion the CrossRip Elite is a better buy, pretty much the same drivetrain and components but has hidden cables and one step up in brakes with secondary brake levers. The geometry is more suited to the type of riding we've been talking about here and has 32c tires already with room for 45c.

    Ultimately you are the only one who can decide. Go in and ride them, buy whichever one you prefer and/or fits your needs.

    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I really liked my Cobia, it was a great bike for the money!
    Thats what I've been reading, everyone has had good things to say about it. I'll be honest though the bike that I really want is the Superfly AL Elite. And after yesterdays tough workout at Blue Clay bike park on the CrossRip it won't be long before a nice new 29er finds it's way home with me.
    Last edited by Clint Beastwood; 04-12-2013 at 05:55 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Beastwood View Post
    Looks like a nice ride. Personally I would rather have the Tricross over it though, and I would take the CrossRip Elite over all but the Tricross comp disc compact. Unfortunately that bike has an msrp of $1950.

    My worry about the Secteur is that its a road bike with discs. How is it going to handle in crappy conditions let alone gravel roads and single track. It has 28c tires, personally I would want nothing less than 32c tires on it and I'm considering putting 35c tires on my CrossRip after yesterday at the mountain bike park I went to. In my opinion the CrossRip Elite is a better buy, pretty much the same drivetrain and components but has hidden cables and one step up in brakes with secondary brake levers. The geometry is more suited to the type of riding we've been talking about here and has 32c tires already with room for 45c.

    Ultimately you are the only one who can decide. Go in and ride them, buy whichever one you prefer and/or fits your needs.



    Thats what I've been reading, everyone has had good things to say about it. I'll be honest though the bike that I really want is the Superfly AL Elite. And after yesterdays tough workout at Blue Clay bike park on the CrossRip it won't be long before a nice new 29er finds it's way home with me.
    Just tested the Secteur and you are absolutely right. The ride was very harsh compared to a CX bike. I did test a Raleigh RX and it was comfortable just the gearing was not so great at 46/36 11-28. Also, the second brakes are very useful on a CX bike. Wish I had a dealer in which carries the Crossrip to test.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ncruz408 View Post
    OMG, I think I may have found my next bike. I was looking for something very similar to the crossrip (Urban road riding bike that can take on a commute and abuse) Cyclocross came to mine because I love the "best of both worlds" concept but found this: Specialized Bicycle Components More for road use than mountain but comes with discs for those wet, muddy, seasons. They also have a tricross as well for more mountain trail use. What do you guys think? Currently it is on sale $1100 at my LBS.
    I agree with Clint. This bike is a road bike with the same drivetrain as the CrossRip Elite.
    I wanted a bike to compliment my Mtn bike, one I could ride when the trails are wet and muddy. With a XC bike, I could use it on pavement, stone dust, hardpack or some of the longer trails that have those combination of surfaces.
    A road bike is good if you are only going to ride on roads alongside traffic, just not for me,at least not most of the time.
    I am loving my two different styles of bikes, a XC and a FS, what is better than having options? Yesterday was a paved rail trail for 20 miles and today will be a mountain run for about 10 miles!

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