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  1. #1
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    Redline Conquest Pro on Craigslist...good buy?

    Hi Guys,

    I hate to start a thread for this but didn't really see any other place that would be appropriate. I was planning on buying either a crossrip or cannondale cx from my LBS but saw this on craigslist today within walking distance from my house.

    I thought I'd ask you guys what your thoughts were on this bike. Thanks for any insight you can offer. I intend to write the guy and see what year it is and get any other relevant info.

    Any specific questions I should ask? Should I just keep with my original plan at the LBS?

    Cyclocross Bike - Redline Conquest Pro

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Sounds like a good deal to me. It should save you some significant money over the LBS. do you know enough to give it a good once over before buying?

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the input. Unfortunately I'm pretty noob and I wouldn't really know what to look for outside of the thing being able to ride. The major appeal for the bike shop is they handle all of the maintenance and such for 5 years. So although I'd save upfront with this, it might not be worth it, especially if there is a higher risk of me missing something big. Looks like I need to spend some time researching so I can have an idea of what to look for if I decide to, and hopefully make an informed decision then.

    Thanks again!

  4. #4
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    You would have to pay a bike shop two or three times as much to buy a bike of comparable quality, and there is value in learning how to work on your own bike. At the very least, it wouldn't hurt to take the Redline for a spin to see if you like it and have something to compare other bikes with.

  5. #5
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    It's a good deal if not worn out, meaning the drivetrain. A worn chain/cassette can cost you $150-200, and a hundred more if the chainrings are shot.

    http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-004/000.html

    Scroll down to "measuring wear." A new chain has 1/2" pitch so 24 links will measure 12' exactly. 12 1/8" is worn out. A chain that is worn 1/8" over a foot will have also worn out the cassette. If he/she rode it like that too long, the rings may be toast also. If you really like the bike and detect wear, talk 'em down.

    Also, check wheel wear. Use your fingernail to check for grooves on the breaking surface of the rim. If it feels concave to your thumb, the wheels may be toast, and that will cost you a lot more than the chainwear will.

    And the shifting of course. A bike raced 4 seasons has been dumped many times, right on the shifters!

  6. #6
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    I think those are very good bikes and that looks like a good price. I bought a similar one off craigslist for my son to grow into, it's a 52cm and weighs about 18.5#, -same as my 61cm carbon sworks tri-cross. If the drivetrain, shifting and wheels are in good shape, that is a good buy.
    Check for wear like stated above, buy a $4 metal ruler (12"/30cm) from your local cheap tool place and actually measure the chain for wear, you REALLY want to do this on any used bike. Measuring metric is easier on the bike; 25.4cm = new, 25.5cm = ok, replace at 25.6cm.
    Look at the chainrings for curve too, if they are badly worn you can see how the teeth get pulled/bent/distorted by the chain.
    I have found that there are nearly always a few surprises when buying a used bike, but bikes are very simple machines and you can learn to do nearly everything yourself.

  7. #7
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    Awesome guys. Thanks a ton. I feel at least reasonably armed going in knowing a few important things to look for. I will let you guys know how it goes! Thank you very much once again!

  8. #8
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    I don't see your measurements anywhere, how tall are you..??

    This frame is for a person about 6.1"/6.2" just remember good fit is primordial for biking enjoyment..

  9. #9
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    My apologies for leaving that out and thank you for bringing it up. I'm 6'2" 188 with a 33in inseam. The discussions I've had with the guys at my LBS put me on a 58cm cross bike so I thought it was likely to be a decent fit.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LTT777 View Post
    My apologies for leaving that out and thank you for bringing it up. I'm 6'2" 188 with a 33in inseam. The discussions I've had with the guys at my LBS put me on a 58cm cross bike so I thought it was likely to be a decent fit.
    Looks like it will fit you with little adjustments..

    Ps: 6'2" is about 185cms, you are more like 6'3" just do the math and you will see..

  11. #11
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    My apologies once again for the lack of clarity. 188 was my weight in pounds. Didn't think it was overly relevant here but I see a lot of guys mention it so thought I would throw it in there. Noobs gonna noob

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LTT777 View Post
    My apologies once again for the lack of clarity. 188 was my weight in pounds. Didn't think it was overly relevant here but I see a lot of guys mention it so thought I would throw it in there. Noobs gonna noob
    Okay I was confused for a second, if you are 6'2" it will fit you great, take it it to a shop and have her check out for excessive wear on the components and frame not just cosmetic scars..

  13. #13
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    Well the bike seems to be in reasonable shape with the exception of the chain definitely needing to be replaced and the cables likely too. Cassettes and chain ring looked ok but I wouldn't be confident in my assessment. There was also quite a bit of cosmetic damage and the combination of all of it led me to stick with one of my original choices.

    On top of me getting a good price because its a leftover '12 my LBS is having a big sale this week so I got a nice deal. I'm a happy camper.

    Redline Conquest Pro on Craigslist...good buy?-cx.jpg

    Thank you guys so much for your help. I'm definitely a more knowledgeable bike owner/surveyor now as a result of this thread and I appreciate everyone's contribution!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by LTT777 View Post
    Well the bike seems to be in reasonable shape with the exception of the chain definitely needing to be replaced and the cables likely too. Cassettes and chain ring looked ok but I wouldn't be confident in my assessment. There was also quite a bit of cosmetic damage and the combination of all of it led me to stick with one of my original choices.
    Just FYi, if the chain is worn, most likely the cassette and the rings will be worn out too and unable to mesh with a new chain.

    On top of me getting a good price because its a leftover '12 my LBS is having a big sale this week so I got a nice deal. I'm a happy camper.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Congratulations, good choice

    Thank you guys so much for your help. I'm definitely a more knowledgeable bike owner/surveyor now as a result of this thread and I appreciate everyone's contribution!
    Now just get yourself a nice pair of cleapless pedals and shoes and start to enjoy your new ride..

  15. #15
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    Intuitively I thought the cassette and rings would also be worn out as a result, and based on the info I was given here that was a pretty big deterrent. But I wasn't 100% sure. Thank you for clarifying.

    I haven't used a clipless setup yet but I hear that is the next step for me. Yaaay more money to spend

    Thanks again for all of the help guys.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LTT777 View Post
    Intuitively I thought the cassette and rings would also be worn out as a result, and based on the info I was given here that was a pretty big deterrent. But I wasn't 100% sure. Thank you for clarifying.
    I can see how you can be hesitant about a used bike, my self I mostly buy used and always take them completely apart, check them, re-grease them and many times upgrade components so I basically only need a "good bones" frame..
    I haven't used a clipless setup yet but I hear that is the next step for me. Yaaay more money to spend
    Clipless pedals make a huge difference and you don't need to spend much money on them, you can even get low end ones used, one thing if you have knee problems you need some with "float" (wide range of motion for the feet) if not SPD (and or clones) will work just fine

    Thanks again for all of the help guys.
    Well now go and help somebody in a field you know..

  17. #17
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    Good idea staying away from the Redline. They're nice bikes but one w 4 years of racing will need repairs. Nothing like a new bike to motivate you. What did you pay?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto View Post
    I can see how you can be hesitant about a used bike, my self I mostly buy used and always take them completely apart, check them, re-grease them and many times upgrade components so I basically only need a "good bones" frame..

    Clipless pedals make a huge difference and you don't need to spend much money on them, you can even get low end ones used, one thing if you have knee problems you need some with "float" (wide range of motion for the feet) if not SPD (and or clones) will work just fine



    Well now go and help somebody in a field you know..
    Thank you for the tips regarding the pedals. Looking into them will be my next order of business.

    Fortunately, I've been able to help a lot of people in a few skill sets I've excelled at in my life. Most notably I am an ex professional golfer (never made it passed the mini tours or q school sadly) who made a living as a golf professional (instructor) in between tournaments. I've helped hundreds of people with their swings and found it quite enjoyable and fulfilling. If you play and would like some help feel free to send me a video

    Quote Originally Posted by mudrock View Post
    Good idea staying away from the Redline. They're nice bikes but one w 4 years of racing will need repairs. Nothing like a new bike to motivate you. What did you pay?
    Yea being a noob, especially from the tech side of things, having the LBS there to support me with the bike is a huge upside. I have a 5 year service plan with my purchase and I'm always in there asking questions and getting things tuned up and such (bought a hardtail 29er MTB from them recently). Had the Redline been in near immaculate shape I may have gone for it, but as it wasn't I definitely feel this was the best decision for me. Plus like you said, just something about having a new bike (I don't mind dings and such as long as I put them there, lol).

    The sticker price was around 1200 and I ended up getting 30% off total, so around 850. I feel it was a good price for the quality of the bike I got to bring home, but even if it was standard, I'm pretty happy with my purchase.

    I rode it right out of the shop and took it on a short ride up and down a multi terrain trail (concrete/gravel/wood planks) and it was a pleasure to ride. Very fast (coming from my MTB) and shifted very smoothly. Everything on it feels very solid and I'm surprised at how light it was overall.

  19. #19
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    Good deal. If you got the Redline for 550, you could easily have spent a few hundred more to replace the drivetrain, and you would still be left with an old bike with old wheels. I know from experience how fast mud and grit can wear out the brake track on rims. Plus a service contract? good choice - a little bit less of a noob than before!

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