Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    898

    Merida Cyclocross 3 - opinions?

    About 98% of my cycling is spent cycle commuting with the remainder being some mountain biking on the occasional weekend. I've got a 29er mountain bike an old road bike. I mainly use the mountain bike with road tyres while the road bike is my back up in case the MTB is out of action.

    I like the road bike because it's fast and light, but too prone to flats which is a pain on a 19km commute. The MTB is sturdy and bomb-proof but hella heavy and slow. I'm thinking a cyclocross bike might be the "Goldilocks" of bikes for me.

    At a LBS the other day I noticed the Merida Cyclocross range. What amazed me was the price was significantly less than all the other cyclocross brands available in NZ (Giant and Specialized mainly) - $1400 compared to $2000K+.

    It seems like a screaming good deal to me. I really like disk brakes because of the extra power which is handy when descending with my clydesdale bulk. I figure that Merida are pretty good quality considering they make bikes for Specialized.

    Merida Cyclocross 3
    Cross/Cyclo Cross - Cyclo Cross - Cyclo Cross 3 - Merida Bikes International

    As I say it will mainly be a robust commuter but with occasional singletrack excursions.

    Any opinions?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: xxxbike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    54

    Merida Cyclocross 3 - opinions?

    It certainly looks the business, although the 'tons-o-stickers' design might make it dated in a couple years.

    You might also look at the stuff from FOCUS. They have a nice design aesthetic and similar price range.

    I don't know if you can get one in NZ, but I use my new Rocky Mountain Solo CX as a commuter and I really like the crossbike as a solution. It's tons more fun than a hybrid, and wicked-fast compared to any useful mountain bike. This may be overly obvious, but you might look at commuter-geared tires since the knobbies will slow-down your fun on a commute.

    My bike has a nearly identical spec to the one you're looking at. Same brakes, nearly identical tranny. I'm a little wary of the FSA crank&bb combo, since mine is constantly going loose after the single track part of my commute, but I'm told it'll be warrantied. I really like the chromo fork. Quite a bit plusher than the alum blade on the Focus Mares I tested. I'm sure carbon would be better still, but I like the idea of adding a rack and/or fenders.

    I like the hayes brakes. They are noisy (gritty sounding, not squealing) but no more so than my MTB stuff. They definitely stop. I've run mid-range Hayes hydros in the past on my old Yeti. I never liked the modulation, but the power was unambiguous. The cable-actuated Hayes seem to have followed in this pattern. I'd really like to have the Avids, but there is a definite price penalty.

    The Tiagra shifting is not as good as the old LX/XT combo that long time MTBers look for (dating myself perhaps), but it's definitely workable. Depending on your terrain and fitness, you might wish for a triple chainring too, but so far for me the lower resistance from the skinny tires permit steeps as long as they don't last too long.

    Moving from a mountain bike past, the biggest difference for me is the big increase in weight on my hands vs my recent MTBs (a dirt jumper that is too young for me, and a 2nd generation Yeti 575 with a Fox 36 on the front). I notice it in my shoulders too on my commute, but long-term, I think it's more personal fitness than bike fit.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    898
    Cheers.

    I'm happy with the 2x10 gear option on the Merida. I have one long climb on my commute, but I could clear that on my old road bike with a 42x26 low gear, so the 32x28 on the Merida should be a doddle.

    We don't have as many options here in NZ and all the competition are well into the NZ$2000+ range. This Merida can be had for NZ$1400.

    My budget it very tight so I'd probably look at selling my MTB and road bikes to fund it. I guess that's why I'm getting opinions. I need a lighter, faster bike for commuting during the week and something that can roll some singletrack on the occasional weekend. I'm not a hucker or anything, I just take my time and enjoy.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: crank1979's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,557
    I have the Merida Cyclocross 4, which is essentially the same but with 105 instead of Tiagra. I also bought it as a commuter. I swapped a few bits like the tyres for Schwalbe Marathon Plus, cassette to an 11-25, removed the flat bar brake levers, saddle to a Fizik Arione and eventually replaced the Hayes CX-5 calipers with Avid BB7s. It's a great bike for commuting. The wheels are very heavy and can really be felt when trying to corner or change direction quickly and when climbing.

    If I was buying again I wouldn't worry about the disc brakes. They don't slow the bike down as well as the Dura Ace brakes on my road bikes. There are only 4-5 places where I brake over my commute so cantilevers or v-brakes would have been fine.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    898
    Quote Originally Posted by crank1979 View Post
    If I was buying again I wouldn't worry about the disc brakes. They don't slow the bike down as well as the Dura Ace brakes on my road bikes. There are only 4-5 places where I brake over my commute so cantilevers or v-brakes would have been fine.
    I have one part of my commute which is a long gorge descent and I'm a big guy so the brakes have their work cut out for them. Discs give me that extra safety margin.

  6. #6
    Wrench
    Reputation: FNFAL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    761
    Quote Originally Posted by R+P+K View Post
    ...I like the road bike because it's fast and light, but too prone to flats which is a pain on a 19km commute. The MTB is sturdy and bomb-proof but hella heavy and slow. I'm thinking a cyclocross bike might be the "Goldilocks" of bikes for me....

    Any opinions?
    Your first problem is not fixing the flat issue on your road bike. Fix that and ride it to work.

    Unless you want one of us to justify your purchase.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: xxxbike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    54

    Merida Cyclocross 3 - opinions?

    Quote Originally Posted by crank1979 View Post
    If I was buying again I wouldn't worry about the disc brakes. They don't slow the bike down as well as the Dura Ace brakes on my road bikes. There are only 4-5 places where I brake over my commute so cantilevers or v-brakes would have been fine.
    I will say, that non-disc wheel sets are easier and cheaper to pick up used, but if you're coming from a MTB background, and you've moved from Vs to discs, its hard to go back. Discs may be overkill for some folks, but on wet days, they are a huge confidence booster.


    Sent by high-tec mobile device through carrier pigeon network using flakey app controlled by less-than-accurate finger.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    898
    Quote Originally Posted by FNFAL View Post
    Your first problem is not fixing the flat issue on your road bike. Fix that and ride it to work.
    It's irrelevant now because I've sold the road bike.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 02-13-2013, 02:57 PM
  2. Merida Big Seven
    By Kristinka in forum 27.5 - 650b
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-10-2013, 01:34 PM
  3. Merida 29
    By fons moors in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-24-2011, 06:14 AM
  4. New Merida Big Nine
    By Phil335 in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-22-2011, 12:24 PM
  5. Merida Big Nine
    By 20.100 FR in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-20-2011, 08:25 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •