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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAVELBIKE View Post
    Personally, I'd just get some nice, light wheels for the Vaya.
    Light wheels with UST tires (e.g. Stan's Iron Cross rims and Stan's Crows 700c x 35mm) are going to be part of my build. One issue with the Vaya is that it is spec'd with a steel fork with a 50mm rake. This would be inconsistent with the ENVE or Whistkey Creek tapered forks that I am considering using on my build. I like the feel of a carbon fork on gravel.

    I could get a custom Vaya frame from the same builder for the above mentioned price. They could also do a Ti fork with the appropriate rake. But I really want a bike tuned for fast gravel riding rather than touring. I could also buy a stock Vaya frame from Salsa for $750, but I would rather spend a few dollars more to get a custom Ti frame. Then I set it up exactly the way I want it.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  2. #52
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    A 35mm tire and carbon fork will ride harsher than a wider/bigger tire with a steel fork. The stock Vaya fork is nothing to sneeze at, comfort/control wise.

    Also, a wider rim than the Iron Cross will give you more tire options if you want more flotation/traction.
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  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAVELBIKE View Post
    Also, a wider rim than the Iron Cross will give you more tire options if you want more flotation/traction.
    Most of my riding is on pea-sized gravel and small-gravel bike trails. For these conditions a carbon fork and the Iron Cross rims/Stan's tires with 20-25 PSI pressure (or higher) will work very well.

    With my custom build, we will see what the maximize diameter tire will be with my frame. If I can actually run a much wider tire, then I can have a second set of wheels for rougher gravel. But I really want a 700c x 35mm setup for my typical rides and hopefully the option of running wider tires when required.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Rain View Post
    With my custom build, we will see what the maximize diameter tire will be with my frame. If I can actually run a much wider tire, then I can have a second set of wheels for rougher gravel. But I really want a 700c x 35mm setup for my typical rides and hopefully the option of running wider tires when required.
    Since this a custom build, shouldn't tire width capability be whatever you want it to be?
    There's only two things in life (but I forget what they are). - John Hiatt

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluesDawg View Post
    Since this a custom build, shouldn't tire width capability be whatever you want it to be?
    Yes but constrained by the theoretical limits of frame construction. My builders can increase tubing thickness and curve the stays to accommodate wider tires, but I am constraining the build by (1) requesting a geometry similar to the Salsa Warbird (as opposed to a true monstercross or mountain bike geometry for intance), (2) by requesting clearance for road cranks, and (3) by requesting clearance for mountain hubs (135 mm).

    The On-One Pickenflick is an example of what happens when tire width controls the frame:

    Found: On-One Limited Edition Ti ?Cross Rig ? The Pickenflick

    FYI, I don't want to use mountain bike gearing.

    I will update this thread when I find out what my builder can do with my frame.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  6. #56
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    Suggest Carver is a lot lower risk than ordering direct from Triton or similar: Custom Ti

  7. #57
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    Update from Frame Builder

    I just got an update from my Ti frame builder. He suggests welding a plate into chainstays to create more room for wider tires. See <a href="http://www.rapid-titan.ru/product/frames/mcmmonster/mcmmonster2.jpg">the end result here</a>

    He also thinks we may need to design a custom monster cross frame. Below is a first cut.

    Any thoughts on the longer-than-normal effective top tube length? Would that cause any issues?
    Attached Files Attached Files
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Rain View Post
    I just got an update from my Ti frame builder. He suggests welding a plate into chainstays to create more room for wider tires. See <a href="http://www.rapid-titan.ru/product/frames/mcmmonster/mcmmonster2.jpg">the end result here</a>

    He also thinks we may need to design a custom monster cross frame. Below is a first cut.

    Any thoughts on the longer-than-normal effective top tube length? Would that cause any issues?
    Plates can work fine. I know there it a stock Ti gravel frame with such, just can't recall. The geometry looks great, but this is a 56cm frame, simply not your size. Now it would fit me PERFECTLY

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVO View Post
    Plates can work fine. I know there it a stock Ti gravel frame with such, just can't recall. The geometry looks great, but this is a 56cm frame, simply not your size. Now it would fit me PERFECTLY
    Thanks, I'll have him downsize it a bit. I need like a 54.5cm frame. BTW, his design allows for 700c x 45mm tires!
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  10. #60
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    Lynskey Procross and Kona Rove Ti(made by Lynskey) have chainstay plate on the driveside.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod View Post
    have you checked out the foundry harrow? 135 rear. through axle fork. disc. lots of room for big tyres. nicely spec'ed. reasonably priced. no hassle TEN YEAR warranty.

    Attachment 869098
    I had a Foundry Auger Disc. I hope the QC and carbon layup is better on the Harrow. My frame was so out of spec that the bike couldn't be built. Then I snapped the seat stays in half on my second ride on the replacement frame while remounting after clearing a barrier. Customer service was CRAP. They lost a customer for life because of that. Hope things are better with the Harrow and that they've revamped their CS.

    Very happy with my Hakaluggi disc!

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by foothillsbass View Post
    This new brand in our neck of the woods is getting a lot of buzz around here:

    Gravel Bikes - gravabike
    $1750 for a Chinese frame and fork, and a seat collar.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by nevermiss View Post
    Very happy with my Hakaluggi disc!
    Likewise! I used my Hakkalugi for a 1,100 km self supported gravel ride about a month ago, and it was fantastic. I couldn't think of a better bike for gravel grinding.

    Looking for a carbon gravel grinder!-2014-02-05-17.13.22.jpg

  14. #64
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    Sweet! What tires are running? I have Kenda Happy Mediums on 23mm rims right now. I haven't tried to put my revelate tangle bag on mine yet--glad to see its a good fit.

    Quote Originally Posted by monolith View Post
    Likewise! I used my Hakkalugi for a 1,100 km self supported gravel ride about a month ago, and it was fantastic. I couldn't think of a better bike for gravel grinding.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    "The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt." - Surly Blog

  15. #65
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    Frame Design is Complete

    Attached is the final BikeCad drawing of my build. Note that the build will have (1) clearance for 700c x 45mm tires, (2) rack and disc brake mounts, (3) 2 water-bottle mounts, and (4) cable routing on the down tube. The build will also include a Ti rack and fender mounts for touring.

    Note the down tube is designed to add stiffness to the frame and the ETT length is necessary to avoid toe overlap. The design includes use of the ENVE cross disc fork.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Hard Rain; 04-05-2014 at 08:44 AM.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  16. #66
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    Looks pretty sweet.

    Toe overlap is a very tough thing to calculate in advance and dependent on many things: Geometry, tire size, shoe size, cleat positioning, model shoe, model pedal, etc. I think people worry too much about it. Personally, in your place, I'd get the geometry right for my torso and forget about toe overlap. Especially for the kind of riding this type of frame is meant for, i.e. not super technical moves climbing.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVO View Post
    Looks pretty sweet.

    Toe overlap is a very tough thing to calculate in advance and dependent on many things: Geometry, tire size, shoe size, cleat positioning, model shoe, model pedal, etc. I think people worry too much about it. Personally, in your place, I'd get the geometry right for my torso and forget about toe overlap. Especially for the kind of riding this type of frame is meant for, i.e. not super technical moves climbing.
    The final frame is quite similar to the Salsa Vaya, which has know toe overlap issues (in my size of ~55cm) with larger tires. My builder increased the ETT by 25 mm to account for my foot size, crank arm length, the diameter of 700 x 45 tires, and the frame (with fork) geometry. While this may not perfectly eliminate toe overlap, it will certainly help and the adjustment is small enough so fit will be fine with a slightly shorter stem.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  18. #68
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    Sorry, just don't agree with the approach. An inch is a big difference in ETT, especially for a bike intended for long hours in the saddle but little to no quick handling moves. But it's your bike, not mine.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Rain View Post
    The final frame is quite similar to the Salsa Vaya, which has know toe overlap issues (in my size of ~55cm) with larger tires. My builder increased the ETT by 25 mm to account for my foot size, crank arm length, the diameter of 700 x 45 tires, and the frame (with fork) geometry. While this may not perfectly eliminate toe overlap, it will certainly help and the adjustment is small enough so fit will be fine with a slightly shorter stem.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVO View Post
    Sorry, just don't agree with the approach. An inch is a big difference in ETT, especially for a bike intended for long hours in the saddle but little to no quick handling moves. But it's your bike, not mine.
    And not to mention the difference in handling when you switch between two (very) different tire sizes (ex: 35mm & 45mm).
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  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVO View Post
    Sorry, just don't agree with the approach. An inch is a big difference in ETT, especially for a bike intended for long hours in the saddle but little to no quick handling moves. But it's your bike, not mine.
    I agree that this frame is not traditional and perhaps closer to a drop bar 29er than a traditional cross bike. I will likely have to play with stem length and possibly stack height. Sure, the frame is an untested risk, but so is a ride on a wild mustang. I will be sure to followup with test-ride reports.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Rain View Post
    I agree that this frame is not traditional and perhaps closer to a drop bar 29er than a traditional cross bike. I will likely have to play with stem length and possibly stack height. Sure, the frame is an untested risk, but so is a ride on a wild mustang. I will be sure to followup with test-ride reports.
    99.999999999% of the population can't ride a wild mustang. Your odds aren't looking that good!

  22. #72
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    Oh Dear, Oh Dear....

    Hard Rain, your frame will be fine. A long ETT is not a problem and will enhance the gravel experience. There will always be a compromise in the smaller frame sizes, just as there are in the larger ones. The longer ETT also gives you more front centre, which makes your bike more stable on long non technical gravel rides. My ETT is 600mm so I do not think 575mm is a big deal. You just set your ride position up the same way as on any frame, Seat set up then reach to the H/bar. No big deal. Yes there are perfect ideals, but in the gravel riding with long straights world, quick handling is not high on the list. Also, my bike is set up to use 26 x 2.1" and 700 x 35 wheels. 2 different tire widths. I ride them with Schwable Rocket Rons on front and Racing Ralphs on the rear.
    The perfect way to test theories. Frankly, I cannot tell the difference between the wheelsets on gravel, but only to say that 35mm is faster, 2.1" are a little softer in ride.
    Grip levels on pea gravel are the same and handling is not compromised.

    Hope you build up a good ride and enjoy your bike.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  23. #73
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    Eric, I agree. With the ability to adjust the stem, stack, and seat heights, I believe that my frame will fit just fine. In fact, my builder has been working with my dimensions, and with the final build, he suggests an 80cm stem length.

    In addition to the longer front center, my frame will have a longer wheelbase than a standard CX bike. This also provides greater stability on gravel rides as touted for years by Gary Fisher.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  24. #74
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    Pictures of Frame

    Here are some pictures of the finished product! Now to finish the build.

    Looking for a carbon gravel grinder!-img_7155.jpgLooking for a carbon gravel grinder!-img_7164.jpgLooking for a carbon gravel grinder!-img_7171.jpg
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  25. #75
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    The Final Build.

    A very sweet test ride!
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  26. #76
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    The Final Build.

    Sweet test ride.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Looking for a carbon gravel grinder!-20140801_131105.jpg  

    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  27. #77
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    Here is the build list.

    Bottom Bracket: Shimano Dura-Ace BB-9000
    Brakes: Avid BB7 Road SL (140mm rear, 160mm front)
    Drivetrain: Shimano Ultegra 6800 (46-36 chainrings, 11-28 rear cluster)
    Fork: ENVE Cross Disc
    Handlebars: Salsa Cowbell 2
    Headset: Chris King Inset 7
    Hubs: Hope Pro 2
    Pedals: Shimano PD-M540
    Rims: Stan's ZTR Iron Cross
    Saddle: Selle Italia Turbomatic
    Seatpost: Thompson Elite
    Seatpost clamp: Salsa lip lock
    Shifters: Shimano Ultegra 6800 STI
    Stem: Brontrager Race Light
    Tires: Stan's Raven (700 x 35), Bruce Gordon Rock N Road (700 x 43)

    I have been riding on the Raven tires, but will test the Bruce Gordon tires in the near future. Will eventually ride them tubeless.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  28. #78
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    That's a fine looking bike.

    Looks nicely balanced, compliments to your builder. Gravel Grinders should be comfortable and your bike looks like it is. To me, you look like you have it right.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  29. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Malcolm View Post
    That's a fine looking bike.

    Looks nicely balanced, compliments to your builder. Gravel Grinders should be comfortable and your bike looks like it is. To me, you look like you have it right.

    Eric
    Yes, the ride is very comfortable. The frame and fork do a great job of absorbing bumps on gravel. Bump absorption will be even better once I start running my tires tubeless. The fit is also great. I had the bike fitted by my LBS to adjust the saddle, stack and stem. My longest ride so far is 55km on gravel will no ill effects to my back, arms, hands, and bum. The Cowbell bars give me lots of hand positions which is nice for longer gravel rides in windy Kansas.

    You called it right, Eric; the frame dimensions work quite well. In fact, the mechanic who assembled my bike said that he is currently designing a frame (in BikeCad) with very similar geometry.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  30. #80
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    I bought a foundry for my wife for Christmas last year and she loves it. She says its more comfortable than her custom Calfee road bike. Stock wheels are heavy - we swapped them out for American Classic Hurricanes. Bonus is she is now tubeless too.

  31. #81
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    Test Ride with Rock 'n Road Tires

    I just finished testing my new ride with Bruce Gordon's Rock 'n Road tires mounted tubeless. These are 700 x 43 c tires and I am running them at about 25 psi. The test ride was performed in the Flint Hills of Kansas on a rough gravel road complete with steep hills and several creek crossings. The bike handled very well on this stretch of road and was quite cushy despite the rough gravel. Mission accomplished!



    Looking for a carbon gravel grinder!-photo-1.jpgLooking for a carbon gravel grinder!-photo-3.jpg
    Last edited by Hard Rain; 09-17-2014 at 01:16 PM.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  32. #82
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    This is exactly the sort of bike I'm looking to build. I'm thinking of contacting the frame maker to say 'I want one of these too please'. Do you have any suggestions for if you were to do it again? I think I would prefer hydraulic brakes, which is what I'm used to. Did you consider their titanium stems? Do you ever use the racks? Are you happy with the iron cross rims? Any tips would be appreciated.

  33. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by dparsons27 View Post
    This is exactly the sort of bike I'm looking to build. I'm thinking of contacting the frame maker to say 'I want one of these too please'. Do you have any suggestions for if you were to do it again? I think I would prefer hydraulic brakes, which is what I'm used to. Did you consider their titanium stems? Do you ever use the racks? Are you happy with the iron cross rims? Any tips would be appreciated.
    I wouldn't change a thing. Everything works very well together. The only modifications I foresee are (1) to change the gearing (e.g. to 50-34 chainrings, 11-32 rear cassette) if I decide to do a long paved road tour in mountainous terrain, and (2) continue to experiment with tires for various riding conditions (there are a myriad of tire choices out there). The rack works well, but I only got it for potential tours in the future. The iron cross rims work well, but you could consider lighter/cheaper hubs; I got the Hope hubs for durability under the toughest conditions. My builder selected my stem size during my professional fitting so buying one of their Ti stems was not an option at time of frame purchase.

    I strongly recommend a professional fitting if you are going this route. My bike fits like a glove.

    If you do buy a frame from the Rapid Company, please post a picture of your final build!
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

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    I'm glad to hear that the bike is still going well. I have started talking with Rapid, so we'll see what happens. Are you happy with routing of cables below the down tube? I see that Rapid offer internal routing but not sure how they do this with titanium - I have asked. I was thinking of buying the full iron cross wheelset and a Chris King threaded bottom bracket - any comments? One of the big costs will be the Enve cross disk forks, but I don't see many other good options.

  35. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by dparsons27 View Post
    I'm glad to hear that the bike is still going well. I have started talking with Rapid, so we'll see what happens. Are you happy with routing of cables below the down tube? I see that Rapid offer internal routing but not sure how they do this with titanium - I have asked. I was thinking of buying the full iron cross wheelset and a Chris King threaded bottom bracket - any comments? One of the big costs will be the Enve cross disk forks, but I don't see many other good options.
    I am very happy with the cable routing on the down tubes. But the main reason I went this route is to keep the top tube free to hang frame bags. Note too that the full-length cable housing helps keep dirt out of the cables.

    I think that the Stan's Notubes Iron Cross wheelset is a good deal. Just make sure to get a hub that is compatible with an 11-speed Shimano cassette if you are going with the Ultegra 11-speed gearing.

    I haven't tried the Chris King bottom bracket...but I might when my Ultegra bottom bracket wears out. LOL

    The ENVE cross disc fork is outstanding. That said, another option is to have Rapid build you a Ti fork. But for a gravel bike, I really like the idea of a carbon fork.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  36. #86
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    Bookmarking. Need to read through this one

  37. #87
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    The Iron Cross rims often have problems for bigger riders - it depends on your riding style and terrain. But they are cheap, so that is good. American Classic is now selling tubeless compatible rims for building your own wheels or replacing the Stans when they die. Unlike a lot of companies who slap stickers on something built by a contractor, American Classic takes extruded aluminum and creates their own hoops. They also build their own hubs, including bearings, and make their own spokes from Sanvik medical grade steel wire. The rim you want is called the Disk 101. Or you might just buy a set of the 2015 Disk 101 that are on sale right now for $399. Since its designed for mtb racing, the Disk 101 will be plenty strong for gravel and adventure riding.

  39. #89
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    ^^^The issue with using mtb-specific rims on a gravel bike is that often, the max psi the rim is designed for is less than you may want in this application i.e 60 psi or higher for road riding. Just need to check that. The Grails are suited for gavel/all-around use as they can handle road-psi.
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    You guys do know this thread is a year old right????
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  41. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Rain View Post
    I am very happy with the cable routing on the down tubes. But the main reason I went this route is to keep the top tube free to hang frame bags. Note too that the full-length cable housing helps keep dirt out of the cables.

    I think that the Stan's Notubes Iron Cross wheelset is a good deal. Just make sure to get a hub that is compatible with an 11-speed Shimano cassette if you are going with the Ultegra 11-speed gearing.

    I haven't tried the Chris King bottom bracket...but I might when my Ultegra bottom bracket wears out. LOL

    The ENVE cross disc fork is outstanding. That said, another option is to have Rapid build you a Ti fork. But for a gravel bike, I really like the idea of a carbon fork.
    Hi, Rob! It's me, Denis from Rapid-Titan Company, we've build your frame! One of my customers gave me this link to your posts after tree years since we've builded your frame)) So, any news or updates from the bike life? I've posted your photos in my social network, people really love your bike)))
    Last edited by zinovey; 02-16-2016 at 07:13 AM.

  42. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    ^^^The issue with using mtb-specific rims on a gravel bike is that often, the max psi the rim is designed for is less than you may want in this application i.e 60 psi or higher for road riding. Just need to check that. The Grails are suited for gavel/all-around use as they can handle road-psi.
    Yeah, this is not really an issue for me as I want the low pressures of tubeless tires for my gravel rides. If I want to ride pavement in the future, I will just buy another set of wheels for that application.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  43. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by zinovey View Post
    Hi, Rob! It's me, Denis from Rapid-Titan Company, we've build your frame! One of my customers gave me this link to your posts after tree years since we've builded your frame)) So, any news or updates from the bike life? I've posted your photos in my social network, people really love your bike)))
    Hi Denis, I continue to love this bike. Since my initial build, I added some aerobars to reduce wind resistance on smoother sections of gravel. I will also experiment with narrower cyclocross tires to try and get more speed on smoother gravel. I have been running the Bruce Gordon Rock n' Road (700c x 43mm) tires that work very well on rough terrain (I run them at about 25 psi). It is a very versatile bike that is suited for more applications (e.g. gravel grinding, gravel racing, light XC riding, bike touring, long endurance rides on gravel or pavement) than I will ever be able to try, but I will die having tried many of them.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  44. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by drmoreau View Post
    The Iron Cross rims often have problems for bigger riders - it depends on your riding style and terrain. But they are cheap, so that is good. American Classic is now selling tubeless compatible rims for building your own wheels or replacing the Stans when they die. Unlike a lot of companies who slap stickers on something built by a contractor, American Classic takes extruded aluminum and creates their own hoops. They also build their own hubs, including bearings, and make their own spokes from Sanvik medical grade steel wire. The rim you want is called the Disk 101. Or you might just buy a set of the 2015 Disk 101 that are on sale right now for $399. Since its designed for mtb racing, the Disk 101 will be plenty strong for gravel and adventure riding.
    Thanks for the information on the American Classic rims/wheels. The Iron Cross rims have held up very well for me (5 km of riding with no issues), but I only weight 160 lbs. Eventually I will have a couple wheels for this bike for various riding conditions (e.g. one for gravel or light XC riding, one for smooth gravel and pavement).
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  45. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljsmith View Post
    You guys do know this thread is a year old right????
    I will continue to respond to this thread as long as I am alive. A great bike never grows old as long as we just recycle parts.
    "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who can win it." - Prefontaine

  46. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Rain View Post
    I will continue to respond to this thread as long as I am alive. A great bike never grows old as long as we just recycle parts.
    Good...this is just the bike I may be looking for in the near future and especially if I return to live in Eastern Europe again and want a dope locally made TI frame that can take me on miles of adventurous but not often single track rides. Enjoy riding in the hills of Kansas, I have many fond memories of touring the backroads around Lawrence, but that was when I was into sport-touring motorcycles instead of the pedalling kind I now enjoy.

  47. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Rain View Post
    Hi Denis, I continue to love this bike. Since my initial build, I added some aerobars to reduce wind resistance on smoother sections of gravel. I will also experiment with narrower cyclocross tires to try and get more speed on smoother gravel. I have been running the Bruce Gordon Rock n' Road (700c x 43mm) tires that work very well on rough terrain (I run them at about 25 psi). It is a very versatile bike that is suited for more applications (e.g. gravel grinding, gravel racing, light XC riding, bike touring, long endurance rides on gravel or pavement) than I will ever be able to try, but I will die having tried many of them.
    Great! I wish you good luck in this difficult process of seaching the perfection))) I'll be glad to hear from you and may be to get few new photos)))

  48. #98
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    I know you got a bike already but I figured i would just throw this in here:

    I just got a Ridley X-trail carbon bike for commuting and possible occasional CX use last month. It has through axles, flat mount disc, internal cable routing, clearance for 700x40C with fenders, integral fender mounts. I picked it up locally at Performance but they are available at other locations as well.

    I compared it to the GT grade and the tire clearance was what sold me on it over the comparably priced and speced grade. Additionally the use of flat mount discs vs. standard mounts and the the full use of through axles convinced me that it was more future proof than the Grade...

    I have about 500 miles on it so far and it is quite a nice bike, compliant yet stiff and quiet on the road and not to bad to look at either.

    check it out: https://www.ridley-bikes.com/us/en/b...llroad/x-trail
    Try this: HTFU

  49. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    I know you got a bike already but I figured i would just throw this in here:

    I just got a Ridley X-trail carbon bike for commuting and possible occasional CX use last month. It has through axles, flat mount disc, internal cable routing, clearance for 700x40C with fenders, integral fender mounts. I picked it up locally at Performance but they are available at other locations as well.

    I compared it to the GT grade and the tire clearance was what sold me on it over the comparably priced and speced grade. Additionally the use of flat mount discs vs. standard mounts and the the full use of through axles convinced me that it was more future proof than the Grade...

    I have about 500 miles on it so far and it is quite a nice bike, compliant yet stiff and quiet on the road and not to bad to look at either.

    check it out: https://www.ridley-bikes.com/us/en/b...llroad/x-trail
    Real pictures in the wild or it's not true.

  50. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Real pictures in the wild or it's not true.
    Trail on my commute home:





    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
    Try this: HTFU

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