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  1. #1
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    New question here. Input welcome - Cannondale vs Raleigh vs Jamis

    Hi everyone,

    Yet another 'which bike' thread... I will very much appreciate any input you have to provide, though. Here are my contenders:

    Cannondale CAADX Disc
    Cannondale CAADX Disc 105 Bike - 2014 at REI.com

    Raleigh RX 2.0
    Raleigh RX 2.0 Bike - 2014 at REI.com

    Jamis Nova Race
    JAMIS BICYCLES

    I've tried to do my homework to come up with realistic purchases for me. I want disc brakes and all three of these bikes offer that. I think I am ready for the $$$ commitment. I have never spent this much on a bike. I want the best bang for my buck, obviously.

    To me, the Cannondale is probably the best route. I figure it would be about $1400 when everything is said and done. The Raleigh would be about $1550. Both the Raleigh and the Cannondale would be purchased through REI and the nearest store is about 90 miles from me. The Jamis (through a local shop) would be $1280, but with Tiagra while the other two sport 105. In general, I do all my own maintainance so distance of a store is pretty much a one time factor. I do not mind supporting a local business, though.

    Are the wheelsets between the 3 about the same or does one stand out above the others? I could not find a lot of info on them?

    Does anyone have a weight for the Cannondale or the Raleigh? I could not find any info on that either.

    If it matters: I am 6'2 and about 205lbs. Looking for a quality CX bike to do a mixture of light trails, road, and gravel. I primarily mountain bike with a full rigid steel SS. I think that my CX bike would realistically see about 25 miles/week average of riding. No local CX races in my area and I don't see myself traveling the 90 miles to get to the nearest organized event.

    That's about it for now. I'm looking to buy within the next two weeks. Any input is welcomed!

    Thanks-

  2. #2
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    Cannondale hands-down. The other two don't even come close.
    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    Cannondale hands-down. The other two don't even come close.
    Hey.thanks for posting, but why do you say that? Component speck for the Raleigh and Cannondale are about the same, I do admit that Cannondale gets much more support in my area.

    My biggest concern with the Cannondale is the funky head tube taper size. I haven't done a hard search but I'm curious about the availability of headsets and aftermarket forks, etc... when the time comes to change or upgrade something...

    Anyone else have anything to add?

  4. #4
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    Brakes, bottom bracket and fork... That's where I'm seeing differences worth weighing between the 'Dale and the Raleigh. Oh, and I ride one of those orange RX2s everywhere lately.

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    I guess there isn't a lot of interest or opinion in these particular bikes or perhaps just this thread...

    I did catch a review of the Cannonale CAADX where the owner mentioned not liking that the bike created some toe-overlap. That scares me. The geo on the Cannondale is interesting. The company choose to keep the wheelbase realtively constant (101.0 - 101.8cm throughout all the sizes) while changing the head tube and seat tube angles more with each different size to compensate? The Jamis wheelbase runs from 99.9 - 103.3cm and unfortunately Raleigh does not list wheelbase on their 2014 RX 2.0 geo page and the bike is very different from the 2013 model.

    My biggest problem is wanting a bike platform that is not popular or supported in my immediate area. I want drop-bars, durability, and the true ability to ride gravel, fire roads, etc... while still taking a spin on pavement when I want to. More than anything I want to be able to throw a leg over a few bikes and really get a feel for what fits me. Okay, end rant...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by fully View Post
    Brakes, bottom bracket and fork... That's where I'm seeing differences worth weighing between the 'Dale and the Raleigh. Oh, and I ride one of those orange RX2s everywhere lately.
    We were ariting at the same time. Thanks for the additional info!

    I have no experience with pressfit bottom brackets. I read good and bad things about them.

    I'm assuming when you say fork you mean the taper, right? The composition of the two forks are going to be about the same, or am I mistaken?

    The info on any of the brakes that I have looked up is all mixed reviews, as far as I can tell. What is your experience with the Hayes set-up?

    Mind sharing the weight of the RX2, if you don't mind? Any strong likes or dislikes? That bike is at the top of my price range, but does fit into it, barely.

  7. #7
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    Hayes have been flawless so far (only about 500 miles in); easy to adjust... No idea what the bike weighs, but could certainly be lightened up with new wheels and other upgrades. I do have a touch of toe overlap, but it only presents on my sugar foot in tight singletrack or clumsy, redlight trackstands. Recommend test riding whatever you can locally...

  8. #8
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    In order of what is most important:
    Does one fit better than the other?
    Do you want to support your local LBS? The extra money is going to a series of smaller resellers. (Jamis and your LBS) Otherwise, REI has your LBS beat.

    Warranty on frameset? Heaven forbid the worst happen and you get the 1/10000 frameset that's flawed. REI moves brands in and out, so don't expect much past a nice place to buy a bike.

    I'd buy a bike with hayes brakes.

  9. #9
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    Where I'm at in Montana there actually isn't a Cannondale dealer in town, but in August I tried a CAADX Disc in Minnesota and I ended up buying the Raleigh RX 2.0 instead. Partially due to how hard it was to get the bike (I'd have to travel to get a Cannondale) while there is a Raleigh dealer in town, and I actually like the color of the Raleigh more than plain black. After riding the two bikes I liked the Raleigh enough that I didn't see a point dealing with the hassle to get the Cannondale. For me, there aren't any component differences that are a big deal.

    I did have toe overlap on the Cannondale, while I'd have to try to have a similar situation on the Raleigh - it was noticable but I wasn't clipped in when I test rode the Cannondale so my foot may have been in a slightly different position on the platform pedal. The Hayes brakes have been good so far, but I've not put that many miles on the bike. I wish I could have done a true back-to-back, but I personally think the Hayes brakes are at least as good as whats on the Cannondale. I could try and measure my wheelbase, but it probably won't be as accurate of a measurement as when a manufacturer does it (I have the 58 bike). Riding on gravel and rough terrain the bike is solid with no chain slap or anything like that - but I didn't get to ride the Cannondale on gravel, just a singletrack path and pavement. When the bike shop assembled the bike and moved the front brake to the right (motorcycle habits) I think they said the bike was like 21.6lb or so but no pedals were on it.

    As for price, I had to spend closer to MSRP than what REI is showing - but that would have been the case with a Cannondale too and I'd have to drive about 4 hours each way to pick the bike up, which would wash out any savings when you consider gas and stuff.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Input welcome - Cannondale vs Raleigh vs Jamis-img_0576.jpg  

    Last edited by AlphaDecay; 10-08-2013 at 03:22 PM. Reason: add a pic of the bike

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by asphalt_jesus View Post
    In order of what is most important:
    Does one fit better than the other?
    Do you want to support your local LBS? The extra money is going to a series of smaller resellers. (Jamis and your LBS) Otherwise, REI has your LBS beat.

    Warranty on frameset? Heaven forbid the worst happen and you get the 1/10000 frameset that's flawed. REI moves brands in and out, so don't expect much past a nice place to buy a bike.

    I'd buy a bike with hayes brakes.
    Hey. Thanks for adding. Unfortunately, there are no cross bikes to try in my area. I will have to order whatever I want to buy, even the Jamis through the local shop. I actually have at least six decent bike shops around me, but none stock Cx bikes. I could buy the Raleigh or the Cannondale locally, but have to put down the money and commit to buy before the shops will order them. At least with REI I can order the bike and if I do not like it or the fit isn't right then they will take it back with no fuss. I do not want to take advantage of that, but it is nice to know I can utilize the service, if needed. I was recently in Atlanta and stopped in one of the REI stores there hoping to get to try out the Cannondale or Raleigh. They did not have the CAADX and did not stock Raleigh at that location. I spent a few minutes looking at a Marin Lombard and a Novara... Something... I wasn't too impressed with either one. The Novara was the only bike in stock in my size.

    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaDecay View Post
    I could try and measure my wheelbase, but it probably won't be as accurate of a measurement as when a manufacturer does it (I have the 58 bike). When the bike shop assembled the bike and moved the front brake to the right (motorcycle habits) I think they said the bike was like 21.6lb or so but no pedals were on it.
    Thanks for adding the pic. They are great looking bikes! I also appreciate all your input and thoughts on your own experience. If you could get a wheelbase measurement that would be great. If not, that's cool. I should be able to contact Raleigh to get it. I can't believe they leave that number off their chart... I'm also looking at getting a 58 in whatever I buy. From what I can gather that is the size I would need.

    Thanks again everyone-

  11. #11
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    Well, I now get to add two other contenders, both from Diamondback:

    Diamondback Haanjo:
    Diamondback Haanjo Comp Bike 2014 > Complete Bikes > Cyclocross Bikes | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    Diamondback Steilacoom:
    Diamondback Steilacoom RCX Disc Bike '14 > Complete Bikes > Cyclocross Bikes | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    The Haanjo looks good. Specs for the two are about the same. The Steilacoom comes with a carbon steerer. The Hannjo comes with what looks to be better brakes. The geo is different on both. Looks like the Haanjo might be more suited for my inteded usage... What do you guys think? Seems like a nice component spec for the money...

  12. #12
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    Wheeljack

    Lets get to the real bones of what you are looking for. No CX racing = gravel grinder, right? You ride very short distances so you're not in the saddle for long periods. Using the Diamondback's for analysis, the Steilacoom will give you a sharper, crisper ride as it is intended to be efficient as a CX bike. The Haanjo is a gravel grinder, will feel a little bit toned down to ride but more stable, comfortable as this is what a slacker head angle, longer chainstay, and longer wheelbase will give you. You need to decide which design philosophy to follow, then look at the bike kit. Both set-ups offer value.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Malcolm View Post
    Wheeljack

    Lets get to the real bones of what you are looking for. No CX racing = gravel grinder, right? You ride very short distances so you're not in the saddle for long periods. Using the Diamondback's for analysis, the Steilacoom will give you a sharper, crisper ride as it is intended to be efficient as a CX bike. The Haanjo is a gravel grinder, will feel a little bit toned down to ride but more stable, comfortable as this is what a slacker head angle, longer chainstay, and longer wheelbase will give you. You need to decide which design philosophy to follow, then look at the bike kit. Both set-ups offer value.

    Eric
    Wow, way to bring it to the needed point. Thank you!

    I'm going to see about getting more info on the Haanjo and see if any bike shops within reasonable driving distance might have one. I'm going to do the same with the Raleigh. Think I going to try to actually try out one of each and go from there.

    Thanks again!

  14. #14
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    I still vote on the Raleigh.

    Nice components, frame, paint, etc.

    Why doesnt the Cannondale do a 1.5-1.125" Taper on the headtube?
    Hammerheadbikes.com

  15. #15
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    I'll add a thought to help your choice/options. I note that you have loyalty to your local bike shop which is good. Selection is limited. If looking at Jenson to supply the 'right' bike, this is also good. You are the purchaser, so get what is right for you. The price range in which you are looking at are full of bikes kitted with Shimano 105 plus variations. None of these items are exclusive and are common serviceable parts in any bike shop, so it really comes down to how comfortable you feel about who you deal with and what you want to ride....you will work it out to suit yourself.

    The taper issue steerer tube/head tube has more to do with the industry undergoing a transition to better engineered carbon steerers. Remember back when, steel steerers had an internal bulge at the bottom, and they were strong in small diameters, then came carbon, that originally had alloy steerers, moved onto full carbon at 1.125". Better knowledge of the material is leading onto doing 1.5" as this suits carbon better. You will notice other components developing this way: eg H/bars and stems. Carbon is an excellent material, but has been constrained within metal dimensions. Carbon needs to be defined for its best attributes and will change the future of the bike in general.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Malcolm View Post
    I'll add a thought to help your choice/options. I note that you have loyalty to your local bike shop which is good. Selection is limited. If looking at Jenson to supply the 'right' bike, this is also good. You are the purchaser, so get what is right for you. The price range in which you are looking at are full of bikes kitted with Shimano 105 plus variations. None of these items are exclusive and are common serviceable parts in any bike shop, so it really comes down to how comfortable you feel about who you deal with and what you want to ride....you will work it out to suit yourself.

    The taper issue steerer tube/head tube has more to do with the industry undergoing a transition to better engineered carbon steerers. Remember back when, steel steerers had an internal bulge at the bottom, and they were strong in small diameters, then came carbon, that originally had alloy steerers, moved onto full carbon at 1.125". Better knowledge of the material is leading onto doing 1.5" as this suits carbon better. You will notice other components developing this way: eg H/bars and stems. Carbon is an excellent material, but has been constrained within metal dimensions. Carbon needs to be defined for its best attributes and will change the future of the bike in general.

    Eric
    Thank you for the further words. I'm going to be in GA and KY in the next couple weeks. I'm going to get on the phone with some shops along the way and see what kind of stock some of them have. I know there is at least somewhat of a 'cross scene there...

    Regarding the steerer tubes, I've done a bit of homework on them and have a fairly good understanding, but the Cannondale uses a 1 1/8 - 1 1/4 size and not the 1.5. It just concerns me that it is yet another size being used and is inbetween the old and new standards. Anyway, the Cannondale is out, especially if I cannot test one before purchase. I do not want any toe-overlap issues and looks like that bike will definitely have that... Maybe I'm just spoiled with my 26' mountain bikes, but I've never had to deal with overlap and I do not wish to start now...

    Thanks again!

  17. #17
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    I have rode the RX and the Cannon and preferred the Raleigh Much better. I also prefer it over a Tricross (Crux getting to racer specific for me also lacks braze on's).

    Why the RX? (should you ask) I don't know but, that is the beauty of test riding rather than comparing on paper. It wasn't just fit either, for me, the RX was just a better designed, better feeling bike. It was very comfortable , handled great and frankly seems like a bargain at $1500 from LBS. It seems to cut a nice mid line between race oriented for the occasional weekend warrior and all purpose that CX is supposed to be known for.......yet........losing that badge quickly imo, as Many CX bikes are becoming Very race orientated , less durable in the name of weight........almost disposable, less multi functional, comfortable,etc.

    I think you are over analyzing this on paper prior to riding them and need to go ride them for an hour each. I would be Very hesitant to purchase Any Bike I have not pre-ridden ............aka........the internet. Nothing beats pre adjusting seat,bars to your fit and riding.........."nothing".

    "Components" = who cares? All the bikes have components that are just fine, all of them will require maintenance or die. Plus in the name of "race must win" mentality that has led to blood dope's and disposable ultra light race bikes........imo......you don't want ultra light, supposably best components .

    I like the Raleigh RX, it is on my wish list. I have Raleigh, Cannon and Spesh dealers here. The Spesh dealer carries Raleigh also yet about a 2 to 1 less margin than Spesh. Frankly, I wish they carried more Raleigh ........

    Enjoy the outdoors......

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinman View Post
    I have rode the RX and the Cannon and preferred the Raleigh Much better. I also prefer it over a Tricross (Crux getting to racer specific for me also lacks braze on's).

    Why the RX? (should you ask) I don't know but, that is the beauty of test riding rather than comparing on paper. It wasn't just fit either, for me, the RX was just a better designed, better feeling bike. It was very comfortable , handled great and frankly seems like a bargain at $1500 from LBS. It seems to cut a nice mid line between race oriented for the occasional weekend warrior and all purpose that CX is supposed to be known for.......yet........losing that badge quickly imo, as Many CX bikes are becoming Very race orientated , less durable in the name of weight........almost disposable, less multi functional, comfortable,etc.

    I think you are over analyzing this on paper prior to riding them and need to go ride them for an hour each. I would be Very hesitant to purchase Any Bike I have not pre-ridden ............aka........the internet. Nothing beats pre adjusting seat,bars to your fit and riding.........."nothing".

    "Components" = who cares? All the bikes have components that are just fine, all of them will require maintenance or die. Plus in the name of "race must win" mentality that has led to blood dope's and disposable ultra light race bikes........imo......you don't want ultra light, supposably best components .

    I like the Raleigh RX, it is on my wish list. I have Raleigh, Cannon and Spesh dealers here. The Spesh dealer carries Raleigh also yet about a 2 to 1 less margin than Spesh. Frankly, I wish they carried more Raleigh ........

    Enjoy the outdoors......
    Hey. Thanks for the good words. Good view.

    Yeah, it would be a lot easier if my local shops were carrying any selection of cross bikes what so ever, but sadly, they don't. This leaves me to scour the net. I did visit an REI in Atlanta and plan to visit some other Atlanta area stores when I'm there again next week. I will also be deigning through TN and NC on my way back home so I'm going to get on the phone with some shops to see if I can work out visiting some for some test rides.

    I'm simply trying to find the best deal in my price range. I don't think anyone can blame me for that. Of course I want to do test rides. It's just very hard in my area. The upside is that I'm doing a lot of reading and becoming a lot more familiar with what's out there and I'm getting a good picture (I believe) of what I'm getting into. I also feel I am realistic in my expectations and know how much and what type of riding I will be doing.

    I also plan to travel to Jacksonville to see some races soon and get a taste of an actual event and hopefully see some cross bikes up close and perhaps get to even try a few out.

    Thanks again for the input-

    J.

  19. #19
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    Good job!

    Okay, so I got my bike! I actually ended up getting a Fuji Cross 1.3 through Performance Bike.

    Here is the link if you want to check it out:
    2013 Fuji Cross 1.3 Cyclocross Bike - Performance Exclusive - Fuji

    This bike was not even on my radar, but after visiting the shop and checking out a few options I ended up choosing this one. Not totally in love with the color, but I don't hate it either. The price point was right for my budget and the component group was pretty good for the money.

    I got to test ride this bike for about 25 mins and felt really comfortable on it. I also took a Shimano equipped bike for a good test ride, as well. I had no experience with Shimano or Sram road set-ups so neither system really seemed to win out over the other to be honest.

    Anyway, I would like to thank everyone here who gave me input and advice. I'm still waiting to take this bike for a real first ride. I used my performance points to order pedals and shoes and they should be in today. Should be taking a first ride later this week!

    Thanks again-

    J.

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