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  1. #1
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    Great but heavy Trek Crossrip Elite Disc: how to improve?

    Hi,

    The Crossrip was finally available in Belgium in February 2013. I enjoyed it since then for commuting but I'm a little disappointed by the weight.
    The handling is great, the disc brakes really make commuting in winter easier than with canti's. The secondary brake levers on the handlebar become a must. I miss them on my racebike already.

    Currently it is 12 kg (24,5 LBS) for the 58 cm (23") version with SPD-pedals and fenders. I already have upgraded almost evrything on the bike: Ultegra, BB7 brakes, Fulcrum Red Power SL Wheels. The latter al still pretty heavy with approx. 2 kg.
    Since I am commuting with this bike I am using Schwalbe Marathon Mondial 700 x 35C, 570 g each.

    Can anybody confirm this weight? What are the options for improvements. It is easy to gain up to 1 LBS by replacing the wheels. I guess that the stem and the seatpost are rather heavy as well.

    Can anybody recommend tyres. I am looking for the impossible: anti-puncture, speed on road, grip off-road.

    Looking forward to hear your experiences,

    F

  2. #2
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    Ashima Rotors are a cheap way to drop some grams. I Would consider some different wheels first, if the budget allows.

    I have had good luck with my Syntace F109 stem on my fat bike. Really light and Syntace has a good reputation. I picked one up pretty cheap online.

    You can usually drop a decent amount of weight by using a lighter saddle. What are you using now?

    Sounds like a great commuter bike, though. Enjoy!

  3. #3
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    2 words, reciprocating mass. Dropping weight from the parts you have to get spinning is the best way to improve the performance of your bike. Drop the weight of your tires, wheels, cassette, discs and crank and you will fell the difference in your feet with every pedal stroke. Drop the same weight from cockpit components and it will feel exactly as it does now.

  4. #4
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    Thx. The Syntace stem seems great. I will keep it in mind. My saddle is from the German SQlab brand. Weight is just under 300 g and I really like enjoy it on my Cx, MTB and roadbike. SQlab Fahrradsattel - MTB + Road 611 Active Saddle, Saddle, test winner, ergonomic

  5. #5
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    Thx. Only tires and wheels remain candidates in my case. I'm considering a second pair of wheels anyway. I'm bored with mounting and dismounting spike tires through winter.
    Which lighter tires would you recommend? I used to ride very light and fast Michelin cyclo-tires but I gave up after flat tires on my way home in winter.
    Racing Ralph should be stronger than those Michelins but not strong enough for daily commuting.

  6. #6
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    Congrats on the new bike! I too have a Crossrip Elite =) Jump on my thread at Trek Crossrip and Crossrip Elite Roll Call hoping to unite all Crossrip owners to share reviews/opinions/upgrades/ etc. Yes I totally agree with you that the weight is heavy for the Crossrip. Mine sits around the same at 24 pounds for a 56cm and I too am looking to drop some weight. I am looking at the Stans 340 Disc Road/Cross wheels...

    Quote Originally Posted by flandrien View Post
    Hi,

    The Crossrip was finally available in Belgium in February 2013. I enjoyed it since then for commuting but I'm a little disappointed by the weight.
    The handling is great, the disc brakes really make commuting in winter easier than with canti's. The secondary brake levers on the handlebar become a must. I miss them on my racebike already.

    Currently it is 12 kg (24,5 LBS) for the 58 cm (23") version with SPD-pedals and fenders. I already have upgraded almost evrything on the bike: Ultegra, BB7 brakes, Fulcrum Red Power SL Wheels. The latter al still pretty heavy with approx. 2 kg.
    Since I am commuting with this bike I am using Schwalbe Marathon Mondial 700 x 35C, 570 g each.

    Can anybody confirm this weight? What are the options for improvements. It is easy to gain up to 1 LBS by replacing the wheels. I guess that the stem and the seatpost are rather heavy as well.

    Can anybody recommend tyres. I am looking for the impossible: anti-puncture, speed on road, grip off-road.

    Looking forward to hear your experiences,

    F

  7. #7
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    Judging by your silence I'm guessing you didn't do any upgrades, which is a smart choice. Yours is a budget bike with an entry level alu frame, heavy wheels (guessing 2000 grams pr), a heavy crank, and a heavy group. Everything works well, I'm not saying it's junk, but you have to up a few levels to shed weight, and shedding grams is expensive. Adding light components is going to be expensive and you'll still have a heavy frame.

    I would sell it and buy a discounted bike like what you see on bikesdirect or some similar website in Europe. Of course if you've made peace with the weight penalty all the better.

  8. #8
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    LOL, not to flame on but I hate when people have that mentality that states "you have an entry level bike" just ditch it and save up for a better bike and don't bother putting money into it, it will be a waste. That's just like saying why race a $10k honda civic when you can buy a $20k 5.0 Mustang. Well dump $10k on that honda civic and you can beat that mustang! I would rather have a bicycle in which feels good to me and having a "one of a kind bike" that you grow into is better than owning a "better bike" like everyone else. Just because you buy a "higher end " bike does not make you better in cycling. I say its 30% bicycle and 70% RIDER. I see guys all the time in STEEL single speed bikes from the 80-90's killing it on local trails and flying by other cyclists in all out gear with high end bikes/components. Passion in cycling is not to get the high end parts/bikes, it is what feels comfortable to you at that moment in time and even more aspiring and self accomplishment when they build something to their exact specs such as turning a "entry level" bike to an all out MACHINE! Yea cost will not be as effective as buying a whole new bike but you get what you want and having others stop you on local trails and asking about what you did on your bike is better than saying ohh its just a xyz bike you can buy at any store. Plus, if you are not racing than weight should be irrelevant, when building up my bikes, I look at what will be comfortable to me and how it will get me to what I want from the bike and not the other way around. When I stated above, I was also looking to dropping weight in wheels, its because I can drop 1-1.5 pounds going tubeless, help me with lower pressure cyclocross tires and I can ride more aggressively on local trails without having to worry about bending my stock wheel. Dropping the weight is an added bonus but there is also additional benefits to it as well. Plus it all depends what you are going to use the bike for. Is it commuting, racing, leisure, fitness etc? Why buy a high level race bike when you are not going to RACE. LOL, there is a young girl by the name of Coryn Rivera who has 47 national titles in racing and sometimes she uses her cyclocross bike to attend road races. LOL she smashing the competition with it. Sorry just had to vent. All that matters is you made an "investment" a good one in that matter do not let others break you down. Keep that same smile when you first rode the bike and JUST RIDE!

    Quote Originally Posted by mudrock View Post
    Judging by your silence I'm guessing you didn't do any upgrades, which is a smart choice. Yours is a budget bike with an entry level alu frame, heavy wheels (guessing 2000 grams pr), a heavy crank, and a heavy group. Everything works well, I'm not saying it's junk, but you have to up a few levels to shed weight, and shedding grams is expensive. Adding light components is going to be expensive and you'll still have a heavy frame.

    I would sell it and buy a discounted bike like what you see on bikesdirect or some similar website in Europe. Of course if you've made peace with the weight penalty all the better.

  9. #9
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    Hi,

    No upgrades since the initial ones (Ultegra, Fulcrum wheels ... see original post) since recommendations on wheels where diverging: on all very light wheels (Stan Notubes Cross Disc, Mavic ...) I was told to be careful with high tire pressure. Hence I kept my wallet closed.
    However I bought some foldable Continental Cyclocross Race tire and they are really making a difference. The total bike weight went down to 10.9 kg or 24 LBS. And more importantly its feels much more dynamic. I will have to find out if these are puncture resistant enough for commuting. The price was no issue: I paid less than 20 on a German website.
    To be continued.

  10. #10
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    To ncruz and the OP: I'm not putting down or belittling ones choice in bikes, I'm just stating a fact. Even though this bike is not cheap by any means, components that are light and work well are expensive. The Crossrip is not a racing bike (Although you could race it), it's meant more for recreational/commuting use. The numerous upgrades to lighten this bike would be very expensive. Better to sell it and use that money towards a better bike.

    But for $2000 I saw racing bikes, last years model, on some websites (Performance Bike, the Fuji Altimira on Bikesdirect). These bikes are less that 20 lbs or 9 kilos. That's how you maximize your money, not by upgrading a soso bike. The time to buy is in the spring, at the end of cross season. OEM parts that were upgraded are harder to sell off than a complete bike. Don't forget the markup on parts is huge compared to a last years complete bike on closeout. I've been down that road many times.

  11. #11
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    Economically you are right. In my case it was the best or only way to find a commute bike with my specs: Ultegras, disc brakes , fenders, size 58.
    Only very few brands n Europe offer this. The Specialized Tricross is not available in Belgium at all, Scott does not build such bike, Cannondale sold out already in 2012 ... .
    The Trek Crossrip is indeed heavy but the position is great for long rides.

  12. #12
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    mudrock, yes I get what you are saying. Its like trying to build a computer when you can buy it whole for a lot cheaper. Looked at Performance Bike lately and they are having amazing deals. A 2012 Altimira for only $1899 and now they also carry Krestel. heheh very tempting. I actually took out my crossrip this morning on a 25 mile ride with 2500 ft of elevation and it handled amazing. The downhill was fun and I love the pulsation of disc brakes when flying down at 38mph. The bike handles very nicely. Quick and great control for what stock components it has. A rattlesnake jumped in front of me while crossing the road at 14mph. Just swerved and went around it with ease. I don't expect racing with this bike but definitely a great commuter and trainer bike to get those legs pumping.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncruz408 View Post
    LOL, not to flame on but I hate when people have that mentality that states "you have an entry level bike" just ditch it and save up for a better bike and don't bother putting money into it, it will be a waste.
    It is! trust me.

    If your main goal is to shed weight, you bought the wrong bike, even buying a complete bike is a mistake since you have to replace EVERYTHING to make it light, if its a rolling project that you ride while building it its ok, but otherwise, get exactly the things you want from the start and only those, the parts you have hand picked for their performance/weight, only then will you have a light bike.

    Me personally I build bikes for maximum realistic durability, performance and unfinickyness, so I also hand pick every part, researching, trying to figure out what will give me the best performance and durability without resorting to 2k@stems and crap like that or lead pedals. In the end it gets very expensive, but I know exactly how each part will perform and what to expect, and I know these are the absolutely best suited parts for me and my use I could find on the entire planet. Cost was not an issue.

    So he's right, wanna have a light bike? ditch everyhing, or save the frame and ditch everything else. Seriously you buy a new saddle for like 150$ and save 100g, you have to do that to every component on the entire bike to get light. Whats a 100g really? Its nothing. take a looks at the bad boy thread in the cannondale forum, there one guy built up a light bad boy, like 7kg, You know how he did it? Replaced everything with carbon... just saying.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

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