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  1. #1
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    Frames with Adjustable Dropouts / Cantilever Brakes

    I am seeing a few more frames these days with adjustable dropouts of some kind, which is a good thing. However I'm not really seeing many with adjustable dropouts that take cantilever brakes.

    Is there anything out there that I'm missing? Bonus points for a threaded BB.
    Last edited by AlexCuse; 01-14-2014 at 02:18 PM.
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  2. #2
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    adjustable as in for single-speed chain tensioning?

  3. #3
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    Yep - should have specified. I want a derailleur hanger too
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  4. #4
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    Another option is a standard frame with a White Industries Eccentric Hub. I've been using one for over 10 years with zero problems.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  5. #5
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    Troll. Got some shorty ultimate s on mine. Can adjust to fit the wheel no matter where it is on the slider...

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  6. #6
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    Re: Frames with Adjustable Dropouts / Cantilever Brakes

    Yep if nothing comes up I'll probably go with the eccentric hub. Have been considering one for my current frame, but I'm thinking about a new frame so figured I'd see what else is out there.

    Thanks for the Troll idea - the perfect dropouts IMO, but I'm looking for something a little racier.
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  7. #7
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    Yup it's a slug

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  8. #8
    jrm
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    I ride a swobo crosby that came with sliding SS and RD dropouts with disc tabs, removable canti posts and a threaded BB. No longer made..

  9. #9
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    My Presidio has sliders...nice riding frame.


  10. #10
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    Re: Frames with Adjustable Dropouts / Cantilever Brakes

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin_Federline View Post
    Yup it's a slug

    Sent from my LG-P769 using Tapatalk
    Probably less of a slug than my km

    Quote Originally Posted by Moby P View Post
    My Presidio has sliders...nice riding frame.

    What year presidio is that? Would love to get my hands on one of those even w/o sliders but with sound about perfect.
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  11. #11
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    That's a 2011, I bought it on a whim but since it's become my favorite ride for anything except mountain bike territory. It will take a lot of tire also. Great bike.

  12. #12
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    SS tensioning through sliders/swingers and canti's don't really play well together. Sure you can get them to work, but typically if the frame has Canti's and is SS, it will most likely have EBB because with sliders/swingers the axle moves. Disc brakes play better with sliders because the brake is typically mounted to the same part that is connected to the axle. So the disc brake moves with the axle.
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  13. #13
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    ^ wrong.

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  14. #14
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    Re: Frames with Adjustable Dropouts / Cantilever Brakes

    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver View Post
    SS tensioning through sliders/swingers and canti's don't really play well together. Sure you can get them to work, but typically if the frame has Canti's and is SS, it will most likely have EBB because with sliders/swingers the axle moves. Disc brakes play better with sliders because the brake is typically mounted to the same part that is connected to the axle. So the disc brake moves with the axle.
    Disc with sliders are the worst. Nah just kidding ebb is the worst. Nah just kidding

  15. #15
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    Would you give me some insight as to how its wrong? I have two bikes, one with each system and have had several bikes with EBB and paragon/tange sliders. I am not disagreeing with you, but please provide some concrete facts that support your claim.

    The largest drawback that I found with EBB besides the creaking, and I've tried everything from plumbers tape to heavy loads of marine grease. The only one that I really was able to stay silent for any given time was a Bushnell. The worst part is that to change a gear almost always results in changing the geometry which was a crap deal for me because I had to change saddle/post position which changed the way the bike felt.

    Sliders are much more consistent because the front triangle remains the same always. You're only changing the geometry of the rear triangle. For me, this was an advantage in the way that I could tune the rear chainstay length somewhat depending on the gear and chain, and through the whole process never had to adjust the rear brake once figuring it is connected to the dropout that holds the rear axle.

    The reason Sliders and cantilever breaks don't play well together is because the rear seatstays are fixed with the brakes on it, and with sliders you can essentially change the rear chainstay length so the axle and wheel diameter so the rim is moving to a different location but the brakes are not, and that sir is 100% correct. Some brakes allow you to make adjustments, usually in the pads themselves, but its an additional adjustment that you have to make with replacing a chain, changing the gear, chain stretch etc. It all changes the contact points between the rim and the brake.
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  16. #16
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    I can see cantis / sliders being painful if you move around a lot. I have mini-v brakes that make it a lot easier to adjust pad height but this is a very good point.

    The only thing I'm positive I want to take to a new frame is wheels, so maybe I should pay more attention to bb30/pf30 frames that have room in the shell to accommodate an EBB.
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCuse View Post
    The only thing I'm positive I want to take to a new frame is wheels, so maybe I should pay more attention to bb30/pf30 frames that have room in the shell to accommodate an EBB.
    People have had decent results with the Beer Component eccentrics which I think is fine as long as you're okay with the geometry changes. I don't know how they compare to the Bushnells in holding strength (I consider them to be the best design) but if your the frame you're specifically after is the pressed bearing type, its kind of the only option unless there are sliders present. Personally I am not sold on the pressed bearing, they seem to wear out faster than BSA English Thread.
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  18. #18
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    Yeah I am nervous about em, I always seem to have creaking BB issues even with threaded BBs and from the sound of it the pressfit bb's are even worse (not sure about bb30). Ultimately I guess its a question of whether I am willing to risk it on a pressfit BB, since it doesn't sound like I'm going to find anything that checks all my boxes. If I do take that risk it seems like I can get a much better (or fancier anyway) frame for the money.
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCuse View Post
    Yeah I am nervous about em, I always seem to have creaking BB issues even with threaded BBs and from the sound of it the pressfit bb's are even worse (not sure about bb30). Ultimately I guess its a question of whether I am willing to risk it on a pressfit BB, since it doesn't sound like I'm going to find anything that checks all my boxes. If I do take that risk it seems like I can get a much better (or fancier anyway) frame for the money.
    "Better" is in the eye of the beholder. Also BB30 and PF30 are essentially the same thing in that the bearings are still pressed into the frame. BB30 is an open standard developed by Cannondale...which is why so much China manufacturing employs it. PF30 was developed by SRAM and the use is "leased out", I don't know if they charge for it, but they own the patent. Both require a headset press to properly press them into the frame and are only differentiated by subtle design and spec differences.

    Complete guide to bottom brackets - BikeRadar

    Personally, I'd go with a BSA English thread and sliders any day of the week. Its a proven standard, inexpensive, and you don't need a $175 tool that doesn't fit in a toolbox to work on it. I also don't like the front triangle geometry changing on me every time I have to take the slack out of the chain or change the gearing. Now if you never change it, and never need to change it, EBBs work fine, but that is the reasons for my preference.

    I have a Soul Cycle Dillinger Gen3 with a brand new Bushnell EBB installed sitting in the garage that will never be built for that reason (hint hint), and the fact that my main SS is a Lynskey Pro. All previous SS frames were EBB, I'll never go back!

    Also, it is inevitable to expect that to get something that is absolutely going to check all the boxes for needs/wants, its going to cost more..and often times means going custom unfortunately.
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  20. #20
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    Thanks for that breakdown of the different BB types - I pretty much decided that the threaded BB is all I can deal with. I have the tools to work on it, and its proven. I don't think I need the incremental stiffness improvement that comes with a wider BB shell. I would like to try a carbon bike sometime (I think it could really smooth out the coarse gravel that I spend a lot of time on) but not that much. I emailed a local builder to see just how much I would have to stretch my budget to get on one of his bikes. Hopefully I get a surprising answer
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  21. #21
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    Re: Frames with Adjustable Dropouts / Cantilever Brakes

    Surly Crosscheck is SS-able. And rim brake.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCuse View Post
    I would like to try a carbon bike sometime (I think it could really smooth out the coarse gravel that I spend a lot of time on) but not that much. I emailed a local builder to see just how much I would have to stretch my budget to get on one of his bikes. Hopefully I get a surprising answer
    This was going to be a very long (and detailed) comparison in frame materials. Plenty of them out there..so I will save the long winded thread :P
    Carbon: If you're doing short fast rides (races) where weight is most important
    Titanium: Everything, best compromise of weight, ride quality, durability (most expensive)
    Steel: If you're not racing, go with this unless you can afford Ti. Typically great ride quality and durability..lose the weight off your gut!
    Aluminum: If you need a light fast racer and really on a budget, please still consider steel first. I don't care how much marketed "compliance" they say they've achieved. They are stiff and dead feeling frames...but they are cheap.

    My suggestion is to go with steel or titanium if you can hold out and save some more $$. In the long run, you'll be left with a bicycle that you want to hold on to and probably stop your subscription to MBAction because it does nothing for you anymore.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nater View Post
    Surly Crosscheck is SS-able. And rim brake.
    I can't believe it took someone so long to point this out.

    The crosscheck is the bike you seek.
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  24. #24
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    I recognize some names from the SS forum, where my surly fanboy-ism is fairly well known - I'm sure they knew I'd considered everything from Surly Its on the table but I would prefer something a bit lighter / snappier.

    The builder I emailed got back to me with a quote much lower than I was expecting for a lugged frame so I think I'm going to try to convince the boss that going that route is a good idea. If I can't there is probably a crosscheck in my future, unless I I find a good deal on an old poprad/presidio.
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  25. #25
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    My Origin-8 CX700 frame has that sort of setup:
    - DSCF1331
    - Product Description | Origin-8

    I removed the rim brake mounts, but it has threaded BB, rear facing horizontal dropout with adjusters on the front side, hanger for a RD. A bit on the heavy side.

    They also have a carbon version (CX700 Pro) but it is disc only, press fit BB and vertical rear dropout.

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