Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StuntmanMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    562

    Finally did my first cross race!

    I was finally able to run in my first cross race yesterday at the Providence Cross Fest.

    What a blast! I went on Fri to check it out and do the pre-ride, just the pre-ride kicked my ass! Previous to that I had never even seen a cross race. I thought riding around on grass, how hard can it be?

    Well I got there and it started raining, and grass plus rain = SLICK. First turn was off-camber after a downhill, I bomb down it as I would on my mtb. I get near the bottom, promptly locked the rear wheel and went down like a drunken prom date.

    After that I thought "Ok, this is going to be harder than it looks. Might have to go a bit easier". So with that in mind I used a bit more caution, and was able to complete a lap with no more incidents. But man, even after the fist lap I was tired! I did 2 more laps, then botched a bunny hop over a curb and pinch flatted my rear. I fixed that, and by that time the rain had stopped and things were starting to dry out, so I was able to go a little faster.

    I woke up the day of the race and was sore from the pre-ride!

    The race was a lot of fun, though I almost missed it. I overslept, then raced over there. Luckily I found a parking spot w/out too much trouble. I got to the start line and everyone was already lined up and ready to go, and as I was trying to figure out how to cross the barriers, the race started! I was able to move one aside and sneak through, so I started dead last. No big deal really, the start was on a wide section of road, but it quickly left the road and went to the grass, and I caught up with everyone at that bottleneck. I was able to pass a few guys at this point, although I was still at the back of the pack. I was okay with this though, as I wasn't racing to win and didn't want to get tangled in any crashes.

    It was intense! Just holding on to my 4th from last spot was tough! Me and two of those guys kept going back and forth. I was able to pass a few more at the first set of barriers (I had practiced my running dismounts early in the week), but I lost that lead pretty quickly on the next straight stretch. There were a few rather steep and loose climbs, I did well on those and was able to pass a few more there, but once again not having the extra energy to sprint on straights made me fall back again.

    Then right around the 4th lap they started waving riders off the track. I had no idea what was going on, but another rider explained that the leaders were about to start lapping people, and anyone that was going to be lapped was finished. I thought that was lowsy. While I knew I had no chance of doing very well, I at least wanted to be able to finish the race. I think there were 4 more guys waved off after me, so at least I didn't come in dead last.

    It was grueling, tiring, dirty, stressful, even kind of scary, but man, I can't wait to do it again!

    The track was really cool too. The park it was laid out in is very hilly, so the track went up and down hills, and a lot of the turns were off camber, and even some of the straights as well. The wet and muddy grass certainly added to the challenge.

    I have to really start training though. Road riding is useless training for that, I have to get back on the mtb and in the woods. The same things that slowed me down here makes me a slow mtb'er too. If I can get faster in the woods, I should be faster on the track.

    What a blast though, I definitely want to do more races.

    And an added bonus, WD40 was there with a tent, and I got some samples of their bike products, and they were doing free bike washes with tuneups. I was never happy with the way my FD shifted, but it works great now.
    '13 Salsa Horsethief 2
    '12 Trek 6000
    '11 Ridley X-Ride

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nakedbabytoes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    858
    Fun, ain't it? This is my first year of CX racing, I have done 2 races so far. My local event director has been really cool and let me race at the back of the advanced racers since I can't make the earlier time race for beginners. When I see I am about to get lapped, I just pull over and let them pass without incident. My last 2 races, I was able to do all 45 minutes of racing(ended up being 5 laps for me, 6 for the leaders) which gives me loads of experience just being out there.
    My first race, I used my road bike with knobbies because my new ride wasn't in yet(was getting a Straggler) but after that race, I ended up buying an All City Nature Boy instead. I like singlespeed more for CX than geared, so why not just go with that right off the bat? My second race was with the new CX ride, WOW! What a difference in cornering and traction! Less bumpy ride as well. It weighs about the same as my fancy roadie also, so barrier carries seemed about the same. So far, no stairway shouldering has been done in either race but the Nature Boy has internally routed cables.....SWEET!

    The thing I need to work on most is remounting.....OMG....why is that so hard?!?! I can't get my mind around jumping on the seat first vs stepping over onto a pedal THEN getting on the seat. I almost think I might need to remount by backwards dismount motion, step onto the down pedal you last jumped off of and then throw the leg over. I dunno....I just can't make my body flying jackass mount!

    Finally did my first cross race!-image.jpg
    2010 Surly Conundrum
    2012 Pugsley
    2012 Felt Brougham
    2013 Salsa Colossal
    2013 All City Nature Boy
    2014 Big Dummy

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fakie1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by Nakedbabytoes View Post
    The thing I need to work on most is remounting.....OMG....why is that so hard?!?! I can't get my mind around jumping on the seat first vs stepping over onto a pedal THEN getting on the seat. I almost think I might need to remount by backwards dismount motion, step onto the down pedal you last jumped off of and then throw the leg over. I dunno....I just can't make my body flying jackass mount!
    I acutally remount both ways. barriers I'll usually jump on, but runups and other things I may put a foot on the pedal first. Plus, this is easier towards the end when I'm tired!

    Cross is so much fun!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StuntmanMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    562
    Definitely a lot of fun!

    The course I raced on had 4 times where you needed to dismount; one set of double barriers on a flat straight, one staircase at the bottom of a hill, and 2 sets of 2 single steps abut 4' apart in a S curve on the side of a hill. In the pre-ride I spent some time on the single steps and was actually able to ride over both sets of them after a few tries, but during the race I was only able to make one set once, then they got too muddy and my back wheel would spin out.

    Some [people would dismount the bike for the first set, then run around the S curve pushing the bike to carry it over the second set, while others would try to ride between the sets. I think pushing in between was faster, riding them looked the coolest. I got some encouraging yells when I cleared the first set w/out getting off the bike.

    And there were some guys that could bunny hop the double barriers on the flat section - very cool. I gotta practice that!

    Practicing the dismounts helped a lot. I watched a few youtube videos, and went to a park near my house and practiced early in the week. Then during the pre ride I actually got to do it for real for the first time, so I got more practice there, and after the pre ride closed I practiced for a little while more off the course. For someone with relatively poor coordination I did pretty good I think.

    I can jump off the bike pretty smoothly (although I really need to concentrate when passing my right leg between the bike and my left!), and can leap back onto it okay, but finding the pedals was tricky at times depending on where the cranks were rotated. The step I need to work on is dropping my hand off the bars to the top tube as I leap (or just before) off to be able to immediately hoist the bike up, I see people do it, but I feel like I'm going to fall if I try to do it all at once. So once I'm off the bike I switch hand positions.

    After this race I'm thinking of re-evaluating my bike choice, or at least setup. I did NOT like the cantilever brakes AT ALL. Between the fork shudder and high effort, they were not pleasant to use. Between riding fri & sat my hands are cramped today. I have a set of mini-v's to replace them with, but what I really want is a disk bike. Also the gearing was not great. Maybe it was just this course, I don't have any other experience to compare it with, but in the lowest gear I was wishing I had a bigger cog in the back for the steep hills. I had to really power up them, and then had less energy after. Maybe other courses aren't like this, I dunno yet.

    Also, I see the theory behind a 1 x 10 setup here as well. If this was a dedicated CX bike, I'd run that setup. I didn't need the big ring at all really.

    Not sure about SS though!

    And funny you mention All City, I was just looking at the disk MachoMan online earlier and liking it.
    '13 Salsa Horsethief 2
    '12 Trek 6000
    '11 Ridley X-Ride

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nakedbabytoes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    858
    Yeah, if I was gonna run geared CX, that Macho Man is a pretty sweet ride! One of the beginner's just got a new one and that is one hot looking ride that stock, doesn't really lack spec wise.

    All my bikes EXCEPT my NB have BB7 disks. I was pleasantly surprised at my cantis on the NB. They made no noise and stopped on a dime with little hand pressure and easy feathering. But then, it was dry as a bone out and they are brand spanking new, only time will tell how things go vs disk. I may miss them...I may not. I watched a CX racer interview from Vegas a few weeks back and she said "Brakes.....my brakes are the least of my issues.....I don't need something to help me go SLOWER...as a matter of fact, I should just take them off my bike completely!" when asked about canti vs disk CX bikes.

    CX, for me, reminds me of my BMX and childhood days of messing around on bikes. That for me, was why I chose SSCX. Trying to hone in on what gear is just right might take some time though, while nothing is ever "perfect" in all conditions or terrain, you can usually find that gear you spend the majority of the race in on a geared bike....then you dial that in on your SS. Yeah, you gotta learn when to mash and when running is faster on hills, and flats...how to spin like a MoFo. My NB came with 42/17 gearing and I switched out to a 19 freewheel in the rear for CX as the 17 is currently too tall for me on grass. But on the fixie side, I do have a 17 surly cog so I can practice getting stronger and hope to go back to it eventually with some work. After all, I am a beginner....
    I think geared, you could easily get by with a 1x setup. When I used my roadie that first time, I was always on the smaller inner front ring. But I went through almost the whole rear cassette(10).

    I did pretty well with dismounts and running. That mounting thing is my current Achilles! I plan on practicing that a lot just around our yard and down at the park at the end of our street by the bike trail. I think the great thing about CX is that you can easily practice skills at random. A school has stairs. Curbs make great dismount barriers. Trees make great corners. Grass in the yard. Hills down the street.

    Best part is....we can only bet better from here, right?
    2010 Surly Conundrum
    2012 Pugsley
    2012 Felt Brougham
    2013 Salsa Colossal
    2013 All City Nature Boy
    2014 Big Dummy

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StuntmanMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    562
    Quote Originally Posted by Nakedbabytoes View Post
    I think geared, you could easily get by with a 1x setup. When I used my roadie that first time, I was always on the smaller inner front ring. But I went through almost the whole rear cassette(10).

    I did pretty well with dismounts and running. That mounting thing is my current Achilles! I plan on practicing that a lot just around our yard and down at the park at the end of our street by the bike trail. I think the great thing about CX is that you can easily practice skills at random. A school has stairs. Curbs make great dismount barriers. Trees make great corners. Grass in the yard. Hills down the street.

    Best part is....we can only bet better from here, right?
    Yup, same here. I was up and down the rears cogs, but never shifted up in the front. I think I just need to get stronger. On the road I try to always stay in the big gear up front, and usually I can, but cross is a whole 'nother ballgame!

    And you're exactly right! Now that I know what it entails, I know what to work on and can practice anywhere. In fact, I plan on hitting the park where the race was on a regular basis to practice there. Heck, I can prob even run the course (mostly) a few more times, as I'm sure the tracks in the grass will be around for a while.

    And yup, things can only go up from here!
    '13 Salsa Horsethief 2
    '12 Trek 6000
    '11 Ridley X-Ride

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    561
    Quote Originally Posted by StuntmanMike View Post

    ...finding the pedals was tricky at times depending on where the cranks were rotated.
    after some practice with your dismounts and shouldering you'll get to the point where the right pedal will remain at 12 o'clock making finding the pedal a no-brainer. You'll just have to learn to be smoother getting out of your left pedal, not bumping the crank while hoisting and being smoother setting the bike down. It'll come with practice.

    something that really helped me was starting really slow and dialling in each part of the dis/Re-mount. something like this while trying to nail the remount (no hopping - just sliding right leg over and reengaging the cleat without looking)

    1 - Leg over cleanly and step out walking/jogging/running with both hands on the hoods
    2 - leg over, move right hand to the top tube then step out walking/jogging/running with left hand on the hood right hand on top tube
    3 - leg over, right hand to the top tube then step out and suitcase the bike (alternatively right hand to the down tube and shoulder the bike)

    etc....

    Something else worth practicing is riding standing up with only your left pedal engaged and your right leg ready to drop. Usefull both in straight away bariers as well as those downhill/ off camber 180's that have a run up on the other side.

    Quote Originally Posted by StuntmanMike View Post
    I think pushing in between was faster, riding them looked the coolest.
    Sooooooo many people don't notice things like this. You can gain a substantial amount of time in the lower classifications by running past all of the people trying to remount.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    383
    Quote Originally Posted by StuntmanMike View Post
    Then right around the 4th lap they started waving riders off the track. I had no idea what was going on, but another rider explained that the leaders were about to start lapping people, and anyone that was going to be lapped was finished. I thought that was lowsy. While I knew I had no chance of doing very well, I at least wanted to be able to finish the race.

    If you want to get a 30-40 minute race you pay for, it will have to be a race that is not sanctioned by USA Cycling. There are more of them every year, so hopefully some are in your area.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    346
    this is really helpful for me...i'm thinking of doing my first cross race this year, maybe even this weekend at the one in Portland ME (any feedback on that one?). Like the OP, i have not even seen one (stuff keeps keeping me away from checking one out!)...So i'm kinda intimidated.

    I've raced cat 3 mountain biking the last couple years, nothing serious, a few (4 or 5) races a year.

    I will be riding a true cross bike (a mid level one, nothing great). I'm trying to think about what i could "practice" this week that might at all be helpful. I am fine dismounting with the leg throwing back...Remount? no way. I can't seem to get that through my head - just jumping up and potentially smashing...I actually had sack surgery last year (long story), so it makes it doubly paranoid-city. I suppose i can just remount the ordinary way - who cares.

    I am only doing this to survive/maybe finish, so that takes pressure off. But any general advice is super appreciated. Maybe just see how i corner this week on some wet new england grass?

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    402

    Finally did my first cross race!

    Cross race is a road race in reverse. The sprint is at the beginning and then it settles down into a race between you and the guy in front and the guy behind you. It becomes very personnel cause you really see a lot of those guys.

    My advice to new riders is don't go crazy from the gate, too easy to blow up and get discouraged .

    Off season try and ride your cross bike at least once if not more a week. It really allows you to learn your bike.

    And you won't really get a feel for cross racing until your 3rd or 4th race. But hang in there it's loads of fun.

    Bill

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    488
    Pushing/running can be faster in some sections but; last race a guy was dismounting and running through a loose sand 180 turn very fast, but I think it wore him out and I passed him before long. If you're good at running do a lot of running, but if you haven't been practicing running it will wear you out. On that note, find a hill to practice run-ups and do a couple twice a week. Run-ups will kill you if you haven't been training for them, they'll kill your competition if you've been training and they haven't.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Chad_M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    115
    I also need help doing to the remounts. While practicing, I was able to do a couple OK, then I landed wrong and hurt my leg / butt. Now, it is like my mind won't let my body even attempt jump on the bike.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    488
    Start slow, practice it as one fluid motion while moving (even moving slowly), I don't think I'll ever be able to do them really fast in that leap like some guys do. There's a log on my training trails, even though I can ride over it I treat it like a barrier, year round on the mtn bike and the cx bike, that really helps. I have a bad habit of a left foot 'stutter jump' as I get back on the bike, I have to try hard not to do that.

    The great irony in the lower categories of cyclocross is all the effort put into barriers, while a large percentage of the racers take corners badly, starting the turn-in too early and ending up in the tape at the exit, holding more speed in but having to give up speed at the exit and accelerate unnecessarily, over and over again (how many 180degree corners are on a cx course?). The race car guys have corners figured out, read a book like Ross Bentley's Speed Secrets, there's all sorts of good info in there that applies specifically to cycling (and cyclocross). I did 2 seasons of 'open class' 20 years ago (c1 equivalent), got a little fat and very out of shape while doing autocross (short time trials in sports cars) but doing a lot to figure out the best line around corners. I started over in cat4 last season, C3 this season. Last year in c4 more than this year in c3, I have passed a LOT of guys in the corners at the exit because they take corners badly, and it's a simple fix, just one chapter from a race car book applied to cx.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StuntmanMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    562
    Quote Originally Posted by starry View Post
    this is really helpful for me...i'm thinking of doing my first cross race this year, maybe even this weekend at the one in Portland ME (any feedback on that one?). Like the OP, i have not even seen one (stuff keeps keeping me away from checking one out!)...So i'm kinda intimidated.

    I've raced cat 3 mountain biking the last couple years, nothing serious, a few (4 or 5) races a year.

    I will be riding a true cross bike (a mid level one, nothing great). I'm trying to think about what i could "practice" this week that might at all be helpful. I am fine dismounting with the leg throwing back...Remount? no way. I can't seem to get that through my head - just jumping up and potentially smashing...I actually had sack surgery last year (long story), so it makes it doubly paranoid-city. I suppose i can just remount the ordinary way - who cares.

    I am only doing this to survive/maybe finish, so that takes pressure off. But any general advice is super appreciated. Maybe just see how i corner this week on some wet new england grass?
    You should totally do it! If they have more than one race, try to get there early to watch the other racers, or if the course will be open to pre-ride, be sure to do that.

    What I raced was a 3 day festival, they had a bunch of races on all 3 days, so maybe not all races do the pre-ride. I'm glad this one did, because it helped me immensely. It gave me time to practice bike handling on the wet grass and offcamber situations, and also gave me some real world experience with the barriers.

    The fitness level it takes to be competitive at this is crazy, I had no idea. Picture just going balls out for 45 min, that's pretty much what I observed.

    Crossracer makes a great point, don't go crazy at the start because you'll run out of gas halfway through the race. I looked at it as more of an endurance thing, and tried to pace myself. Plus, at first some of the obstacles turn into bottlenecks, so you can really catch up there. In my race, there was a bridge you had to ride over. I got there and it looked like a cattle crossing, it was just a herd of guys walking their bikes over that. I was like F that, I'm not walking. I rode in circles till the bridge was clear, then RODE over it, and promptly caught up with the guys at the next turn. I got a lot of cheers for doing that actually. (I love the spectator aspect of it, people heckle and cheer you on). I kept yelling at the spectators "I need more cowbell!" lol.

    And also, there might have been a hundred guys in that race, but I was only really racing about 5 of them, we were in a group and kept passing each other. My whole race (while it lasted) was trying to keep up with the guy in front of me, and not let the 2 guys behind me pass me.

    After racing, I have a better idea how to train. Today I rode to a park near my house that has some hills on it's border, and I alternated between sprinting up the hills, weaving in and out of trees, and practicing my dismounts and grabs. I got some weird looks from people in the park, but ef 'em. I'm going to leave my cross tires on the bike and make this part of every ride I do now.

    And yeah, doing this on wet grass is a good idea. Wet grass is SLICK when you're only on 32C's. (funny enough, at this point I'm just about positive I'd do better on my MTB in a cross race than on my actual cross bike). In my extremely limited experience, the corners can be very tight, so being able to corner around tight, possible offcamber turns is good. Practice unclipping a foot to steady yourself around those corners or catch yourself if you start to slide. I saw a lot of guys do this.

    Even shouldering your bike and running up/down hills or stairs will prob help, if nothing else other than cardio and learning the best way to carry the bike.

    If you raced MTB though, you should be in good shape and have a leg up on the endurance aspect of it. I've been doing mostly road riding all summer, and I plan on getting back into MTB over the fall and winter. I've ridden a few times already over the past few weeks, and I'm remembering that a 40mile road ride is nothing compared to a 10 mile MTB ride.

    As far as the remount, I have to say I never smashed my sack, but I can understand how you'd be paranoid. I was worried the first few times, but it seems that my cycle shorts keep everything tucked up safely out of the way.

    Speaking of, thanks for the tips, Walt. I did a little better today with finding the pedals.

    Jumping back on the seat has been not that bad for me, I think the worst part is swinging my right leg between my left and the bike. I'm getting good at it, but there's still a split second of panic where I think I'm going to get tangled and fall. Only did that once in practice. I've been falling off bikes since I was 4, so I've gotten used to it. I "fall good" as I like to say. Never any injuries other than scrapes and bruises, knock on wood.

    I gotta say, I'm pumped for cross now. I had so much fun, I'm really glad I just jumped in and tried it. I almost didn't, even the practice laps were intimidating and I started to get second thoughts, but then I thought hey, I have insurance and you only live once!
    '13 Salsa Horsethief 2
    '12 Trek 6000
    '11 Ridley X-Ride

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by StuntmanMike View Post
    You should totally do it! If they have more than one race, try to get there early to watch the other racers, or if the course will be open to pre-ride, be sure to do that.

    What I raced was a 3 day festival, they had a bunch of races on all 3 days, so maybe not all races do the pre-ride. I'm glad this one did, because it helped me immensely. It gave me time to practice bike handling on the wet grass and offcamber situations, and also gave me some real world experience with the barriers.

    The fitness level it takes to be competitive at this is crazy, I had no idea. Picture just going balls out for 45 min, that's pretty much what I observed.

    Crossracer makes a great point, don't go crazy at the start because you'll run out of gas halfway through the race. I looked at it as more of an endurance thing, and tried to pace myself. Plus, at first some of the obstacles turn into bottlenecks, so you can really catch up there. In my race, there was a bridge you had to ride over. I got there and it looked like a cattle crossing, it was just a herd of guys walking their bikes over that. I was like F that, I'm not walking. I rode in circles till the bridge was clear, then RODE over it, and promptly caught up with the guys at the next turn. I got a lot of cheers for doing that actually. (I love the spectator aspect of it, people heckle and cheer you on). I kept yelling at the spectators "I need more cowbell!" lol.

    And also, there might have been a hundred guys in that race, but I was only really racing about 5 of them, we were in a group and kept passing each other. My whole race (while it lasted) was trying to keep up with the guy in front of me, and not let the 2 guys behind me pass me.

    After racing, I have a better idea how to train. Today I rode to a park near my house that has some hills on it's border, and I alternated between sprinting up the hills, weaving in and out of trees, and practicing my dismounts and grabs. I got some weird looks from people in the park, but ef 'em. I'm going to leave my cross tires on the bike and make this part of every ride I do now.

    And yeah, doing this on wet grass is a good idea. Wet grass is SLICK when you're only on 32C's. (funny enough, at this point I'm just about positive I'd do better on my MTB in a cross race than on my actual cross bike). In my extremely limited experience, the corners can be very tight, so being able to corner around tight, possible offcamber turns is good. Practice unclipping a foot to steady yourself around those corners or catch yourself if you start to slide. I saw a lot of guys do this.

    Even shouldering your bike and running up/down hills or stairs will prob help, if nothing else other than cardio and learning the best way to carry the bike.

    If you raced MTB though, you should be in good shape and have a leg up on the endurance aspect of it. I've been doing mostly road riding all summer, and I plan on getting back into MTB over the fall and winter. I've ridden a few times already over the past few weeks, and I'm remembering that a 40mile road ride is nothing compared to a 10 mile MTB ride.

    As far as the remount, I have to say I never smashed my sack, but I can understand how you'd be paranoid. I was worried the first few times, but it seems that my cycle shorts keep everything tucked up safely out of the way.

    Speaking of, thanks for the tips, Walt. I did a little better today with finding the pedals.

    Jumping back on the seat has been not that bad for me, I think the worst part is swinging my right leg between my left and the bike. I'm getting good at it, but there's still a split second of panic where I think I'm going to get tangled and fall. Only did that once in practice. I've been falling off bikes since I was 4, so I've gotten used to it. I "fall good" as I like to say. Never any injuries other than scrapes and bruises, knock on wood.

    I gotta say, I'm pumped for cross now. I had so much fun, I'm really glad I just jumped in and tried it. I almost didn't, even the practice laps were intimidating and I started to get second thoughts, but then I thought hey, I have insurance and you only live once!
    that's awesome. I meant to at least go watch some of the Provi one...and yeah, thanks for the insight and motivation. I've split my time between road riding and mountain biking this summer/into fall (nothing crazy for road rides, never anything more than close to 40 milers, but i've been out pretty consistently). I get the sense i'm in decent shape, but that this would probably still crush me. As in, running/running up stuff, etc. Totally not used to it...and cornering - i'm assuming my mountain biking will help me, but i'm concerned. Today was really the first day i popped my cross (use it as my commuter) bike onto grass! i wonder how i'd handle off camber cornering and such...and not take out poles and flags!

    I'm glad someone pointed this forum out to me, i always just passed this over while getting to my state or bike type forum on here. This is great for those checking out cross from mountain biking!

    It's kind of a long drive up to the Portland one, but the only reason i might do it is because the cat 4/5 is actually around 1pm. Usually, isn't it the other way around? beginner first?

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FatCloud's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    196
    I did my first cross race this past weekend too.
    Of course it wasn't sanctioned, because I'm not money bags mcgoo here (30 dollars to ride my bike in circles? Naaaaaaah). It was the day after the gnarly Endless Summer of Slaughter Alleycat so it was a thin race (5 racers?). Things went great. On the warmups I had a blast hopping on and off my bike. Then we started the race. Our run up was a bandstand. As soon as we started some yoga-hippies decided that the park was their's for the day (I mean, we are on bikes, we're still second class citizens, I almost forgot). I wanted no confrontation, I just wanted to keep riding (although the runup was awesome, and I was bummed I wasn't going to do it). One of our other riders kept running through the yoga. Most of the people were like "whatever, there done in 20 minutes or so let em ride", but one guy wasn't into it and grabbed this first place rider. Not cool. Then we had another guy threaten us with gun violence (really nerdy guy who probably has never seen a gun before telling us about gun violence in Oakland), this was also right after the race organizer was held up by gun point. Stupid lame.

    **** got serious and the first instigator put hands on one of our riders again and things got heated. We eventually walked away and just drank beers. It was a bummer, but I had fun throwing my bike around like that. Hopefully there will be more low fee/no fee races coming up (I'm half considering one of the SFSP races, but again, ****'s stupid expensive).

  17. #17
    Outlaw
    Reputation: Joe_Re's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    101
    Mike,

    Congrats on the race. I was at the start line looking for you but must have missed you since you came in at the whistle and I think I started walking up-course right before the start. There are lots more races to get in on, and the weather should get better from here.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StuntmanMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    562
    Thanks Joe. I looked for you after the race, but ended up leaving rather early. I got a free bike wash/tune from WD40 after my race, rode around for a bit and watched the Women's Race.

    I was looking online last night and found a few non-USAC races close by, so I'll be doing those. I can't wait!

    FatCloud, that's crazy! Goddamn hippies!
    '13 Salsa Horsethief 2
    '12 Trek 6000
    '11 Ridley X-Ride

Similar Threads

  1. 1st Cross Race
    By Rock-o-holic in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-19-2012, 02:31 PM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-05-2012, 11:32 AM
  3. Cross Bike or MTB for first cross race
    By tooclosetosee in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 09-28-2012, 09:25 AM
  4. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 09-18-2012, 11:46 AM
  5. Finally did my first Mtb Race
    By fda47 in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-13-2011, 05:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •