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  1. #1
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    Cyclocross build questions

    Hi!

    Im considering to build a Cyclocross like bike.
    What i want is: V-brakes, compact road crank, flat handlebar and triggershifters ( NOT Sti)
    So the bike i consider is not a real cyclocross..

    The use for it will be gravel, since we have a couple big gravel races here in Norway/Sweden which everyone is competing in. Almost every work place have their own "team" which is cycling these races..
    As a trials/dh/almountain cyclist i feel that a cyclocross would be the perfect tool for these races.
    Altough, since these races are called mtb races its not allowed with roadhandlebars, a normal style is reqiured.

    Which gear system fits my need? 2sp x10. Compact crank and 11-30 or 11-27 casette. Does a Shimano XT system with 2x10 work? Medium cage?

    Any cheap and cheerfull framesets for sale? Steel would be good for dampening the roughest gravel parts?

    Does a v-brake fit on the cantilever studs? i know they did before but the cyclox brakes looks insane compared to the old stuff.

    Cheers, Vegard

  2. #2
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    There is no reason why you could not build a flat-bar bike from a cyclo-cross base bike. Find what you like, remove the cables/bars/stem, and re-fit a flat bar set-up. Gearing will depend on terrain, flat'ish, mixed or really mountainous.The medium cage derailleur will handle the up to 27tooth fine. The V-brake conversion from canti's, no problem, as far as any frame builders spec sheet goes, there is no axle to braze-on dimensional differences. I understand that you are on a budget? Steel frame would be the best place to start. Carbon is also good but pricey.

    If you do decide to buy a bike, try to get a cyclo cross bike with a longer top tube, as you loose the reach by putting on a flat bar, you will need to use a longer steerer stem to compensate that loss of reach to the brake levers of the drop-bars. Also, I recommend a frame that has a fork with a shorter off-set, say in the 39-42mm range.
    I prefer a bike on gravel that self steers rather than flop and meander through loose gravel patches.

    The most important thing is to set yourself up so you are comfortable as possible, in the most efficient ride/peddle, power down way you can.

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  3. #3
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    My budget would be around 2200$

    The specs i have been "dreaming" of is rougly:

    Hongfu FR601 frame and fork
    SunRingle wheels ( Cheap, feels solid and ok light)
    Sram Red crankset with absoluteblack narrow-wide chainring 42t
    Clarks Lightweight "kcnc" replica v-brakes
    XT drivetrain system. 11-34kasette.
    Goodridge wires for the brakes
    Continental tyres.

    random cheap/light stuff: flexy seatpost, narrow handlebar, long stem, seat, pedals

  4. #4
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    I think you could get a similar effect with a HT 29er, rigid fork, and narrow tires. Probably easier to get that to fit properly vs. guessing at top tube length and the effect of flat vs. drop bars.

  5. #5
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    I'm considering that aswell.
    How would the geometry be on a cyclocross compared to a 29er? My guess is that the 29er is that it have shorter reach and higher bb.. not ideal for riding on only gravel and asphalt?

  6. #6
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    You may have to get pen and paper out and draw up a line drawing centre to centre of each of the frames - Cyclo vrs 29'er. Then overlay one drawing over the other to see the variations. A 29'er may have a slacker Head tube angle which swapped out with a rigid fork that has a shorter axle center, will bring the H/T to a steeper angle, also lowering the BB height, and dropping the ground to Handle bar height. You need to do drawings to sort this out, but there are usually enough specs given by the various bike manufacturers to do this. You will learn heaps if you play with the pencil a bit. You can sort out what you want this way without spending any money. I mentioned the need for the longer effective Top Tube as CX bikes follow road bike design with a shorter length in this area and it will effect how you end up converting to a flat bar. Unfortunately, the ideal bikes are not really made (flat bar type) so a little bit of pen work and head work can be a strategic winner.

    Good Hunting

    Eric
    If I don't make an attempt, how will I know if it will work?

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the tip! will do some calculations..
    Most of the mtb rigid forks are compensated, so they are as long as a suspension fork. So that the geometry will not be affected when you mount a rigid.

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