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  1. #1
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    BB5 Disc Brakes - First big ride question

    Hey all,

    New bike with BB5 disc's, i do get a bit of noise here and there through the front but I'm giving it time to settle. Had a 30km commute to work today, first decent ride on the bike after getting it and having it setup and by the time i got to work if i used the back brakes I'd hear noise and feel some 'clicking' through the shifter, this wasn't present on the entire ride in. Got to work and gave the back wheel a light spin, and it stopped pretty fast. I've turned the pad adjustment out and has fixed it a little however wondering if there is anything else to try other than unscrewing and re-seating?

    I can't figure out why they were flush and fine all the way in and then all of a sudden started rubbing and carrying on.

  2. #2
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    Since the BB5 only has adjustment for the outboard pad you will have to recenter the caliper to get rid of the rubbing. I don't really know why it started during your ride, but if I had to guess I would say that the caliper bolts probably weren't tight enough and that the caliper moved when you were braking.
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  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    The BB5 has adjustments for both pads. You just need an Allen key for the inboard pad.

    Honestly, sounds like maybe grit. The pads don't always retract like they mean it when you adjust them with the little dials either. Also give the brake lever a hard squeeze after any adjustment to make sure everything's seated.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    The BB5 has adjustments for both pads. You just need an Allen key for the inboard pad.
    I believe that's BB7. And you need Torx not hex.

  5. #5
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    BB7 has adjusters for both sides. bb5 only has it for the backside, but you can adjust the outside brake pad by adjusting the barrel screw on the brake lever (if you're trying to tighten it or started with the barrel a couple turns out).

    The rotor might have warped from heat or pick up some dirt. Don't know where you ride or how hard you brake, so those are just possibilities. I'd just wipe it down with rubbing alcohol and make sure the rotor is true. Adjust the pads for 1-2mm on each side of the rotor.
    Another weird possibility that I dealt with was a little bit of slack in the brake cable when at rest. When I would brake hard, I'd get this weird vibration through the lever. It was nothing more than slapping the loose brake cable against the frame. Tightened it up at the lever and went away.

  6. #6
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    Thanks all, don't have the tools with me however will be packing them from now on, all I can do is check the the disc and see if it is dirty and try to clean it. I'm hoping that it's ok as i hardly used my back brake for the entire 30km ride in....

    I gotta admit, spending this amount on a bike and having the brakes play up day 1 is pretty annoying.

  7. #7
    jrm
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    Before you do anything make sure the wheels are well seated all the way in the dropouts and tighten the QRs. Next back out the brake arm tension screws. Then try setting the pads up with the bolts between the caliper and adapter a bit loose so the caliper can center over the rotor. Then once you think you have it tighten the caliper bolts while holding the brake lever in. Repeat.

    Ive rode bb7s for so long and there a pretty good mechanical disc brake. Recently switched over to the dual piston trp mechanicals. The dual piston design eliminates alot of the fiddling around required with the bb7s

  8. #8
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    Don't bother cleaning your brakes. At least, don't bother in between pad changes. They're ground zero for getting crap sprayed into them on a commute. It's futile. The rotors are designed to be tolerant of that. I think the slotted ones may work a little better.

    Mountain bikes and commute bikes make noise.

    Road bikes usually make noise too, but if you're precious about it and only ride on clean, dry roads, and don't stop pedaling, you might be able to get them to shut up.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
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    Thanks all, going to be mucking around with it tonight and testing your suggestions. It's tough as I was talking to a mate of mine with the same brakes and he gets noise as well, not the clicking tho.

    This is all part of me learning the cross bikes and discs after riding with the old style brakes for so long.

    I did notice when moving the bike last night to put the bins out another noise from the brakes. Just wheeling it backwards it made a long sort of high pitched 'errrrrrrrhhhhhhh' sound. This could be due to the mechanic at the bike shop setting the brakes up with me sitting on the bike, so my weight could be a difference here and when i get off it there is rubbing.

  10. #10
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    You should be able to get them set up so they don't drag.

    Can you post a pic of the inboard side of the caliper?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    You should be able to get them set up so they don't drag.Can you post a pic of the inboard side of the caliper?
    K have d*cked around with these brakes both front and back for 45 mins...slight drag from the un-adjustable pad on both that I'm just going to live with until it wears a bit or shall we say 'beds in'.Going to test ride now, am hopeful after loosening and re-seating that they roll smooth when I'm on the bike as well as they do when I'm working it on it with no rider weight....as this is how they set me up in the shop, with me sitting on the bike...Will report back, with photo's if I can't figure it out. And then i'll take the thing back and ask them to re-set it up :-)

  12. #12
    The Fastest of Bananas
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    BB5s are kinda shite compared to 7s. I have a set on my commuter

    Sent from my LG-LS995 using Tapatalk

  13. #13
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    I had bb7s for 2years. They are heavy, and noisy.

    TRP spyre ftw.

  14. #14
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    Given that it's a new bike and the problem showed up on your first ride, before you started screwing with the brakes, take it back to the shop and get them to deal with it. It's not your problem.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
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    I have BB5s on my winter/rain bike, and I have found they are tricky to get adjusted perfectly. However, when everything is set up correctly they give good performance and don't rub.

    Since the outboard pad is not adjustable, it is critical to get the caliper aligned properly to the disc. If you use the barrel adjuster in an attempt to adjust the outboard pad, this can cause the leverage of the caliper to be poor and give weak braking.

    You also want to make sure the rotor is as true as possible which will help prevent rubbing and allow you to adjust the brake with less pad clearance. If the pad clearance is too large, the leverage on the brake will be reduced which will cause weak braking, or your brake lever may even bottom out against your handlebar.

    FWIW, my shop mechanic was unable to adjust the brakes very well. I have found this method to work pretty well, though.

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