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  1. #1
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    Which Transition in 06 ? Bottlerocket ?

    Ayone thinking of picking a Bottlerocket up ? ( I am)

    I wonder how it will pedal on trails ? Obviously it is going to be fairly heavy unless you take the offensive on keeping it light while building.

    I can't imagine a better do it all bike: Simple, tough, stiff, slack, low slung design. Should rail, drop, sprint...

    Plus, a Rider owned CS oriented small company.

    Given this is a Gravity machine. I can only thing that could make it better: a 30-32lb build (if that is even feasible). That would simply be finer than a _______a.


  2. #2
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    Bottlerocket is gonna blow up when it comes out. There are quite a few over on the DH/Freeride forum that are excited about the bike. Seeing as how the frame is about a pound lighter than the Preston then it's definately feasible to build it up in the light 30's although for what the main purpose of the bike is I would think strong enough components would bring it to around 35lbs. It should do alright in the pedaling department as long as you run a platform shock like the SPV or ProPedal. I would've probably jumped on one of these had it come out in Feb. when i bought my Preston.

  3. #3
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    Bottlerocket: 8lb w/o shock (no size listed)

    Preston: 8.9 w/ shock (no size listed)

    Bullit is 9.4lbs w/ 5th shock for reference since i2i is close & most people have seen them (for a large)

    So, a Bottlerocket will be heavier by ~1/2 lb @ ~ 9.5 to 10lbs w/ steel coil

    (voodoo math : DHX coil 800gm ~10lbs, DHX air 450gms~9.5lbs, Ti spring savings on a coil 250- 300gms~9.25lbs, Vanilla RC 700gms,5th 900gms)

    Similar to a Bullits weight. routinely built 33-35 lbs w/ good durable parts.
    Last edited by greenmacheen; 05-16-2006 at 03:30 AM.

  4. #4
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    Preston at 34

    I built my Preston up at about 34 lbs. with durable, freeride style parts. It pedals like a champ with the Manitou Swinger SPV on the back. The Bottlerocket does look sweet, but it maybe tough to trail ride on it because of the really tight geometry. Just looking at the frame geometry, that bike was designed for going down really fast, not up. I am guessing it would be annoying on long climbs. But, if you are willing to suffer on the climb (or if you take a chairlift up), going down should be a blast. Not to mention jumps, drops and stunts.

    I am taking my Preston to the Diablo Pike Park in a couple weeks to put it through its paces. I'll let you know how it goes.

  5. #5
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    What do you mean by tight geometry ?

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    tight geometry

    The Bottlerocket geometry looks very slack and I am guessing that the geometry the cockpit is going to be tight (ie, short top tube) with the short stem and the tall fork. The rider is going to end up being very upright. That and the low bottom bracket are probably going to make climbing a bit of a chore. That said, it looks sweet for drops and jumps and seeing as how its going to be fairly light, it will be a blast to toss around in the air. I suppose it depends on the type of riding you'll be doing...

  7. #7
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    OK, Gotcha. Wasn't sure on your term.

    I think the most interesting geo. is the seat tube. They obviously want it steep. I wonder what that will do to the ride ?

    my geo translation:

    Slack HA : stable @ speed & slow tech riding/climbing
    Low BB? : rails corners on way down
    Short length HT, CS, ST : Manueverability
    Steep ST : Balance point ? Quickness ? Dunno

  8. #8
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    Geometry

    That is a pretty good assessment of how the geometry will react. Here is my interpretation:

    Slack HA : Great at speed, sluggish in the tight singletrack and tough to get all the power out of your legs. The slacker the bike, the less efficient you are going to be pedalling (for the most part)

    Low BB: A low BB is great for manueverability but here on the East Coast we get a lot of downed trees, nasty sticks and sharp rocks. The lower the BB, the greater chance you have of shearing your derailleur off on one of those suckers. Not to mention bottoming out on log crossings.

    Short length HT, CS, ST : Manueverability is right. Personally, I prefer a shorter head tube so that I am a bit more upright, especially for freeride. Unfortunately, the more upright you are, the less efficient your legs are going to be.

    Steep ST : Seat tube angle is interesting because it can change the cockpit geometry depending on how high you put the seat up.

    Basically, as far as I can tell, it seems like the Bottlerocket is designed with a very specific purpose in mind, bike park riding. It would also rip on freeride trails and even downhill. Its probably not the best choice for a "do-it-all" bike but I suppose it depends on how much you would be willing to put up with the discomfort of climbing, etc., for the sweet performance on the downhills and tricks....

  9. #9
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    Why would your BB height have any affect on whether or not you ripped your derailluer off? seems to me no matter what your BB height your derailluer is at a constant height since it is close to your rear axel. If you wanted your DR out of the way get a medium or short cage. Am I missing somehting here?

    Another thing with the bottlrocket is because everthing is low slung on this bike it will be easier to get your feet over the top tube for tricks. I am a little suprised that they didn't incorporate rotor tabs like on the Cowan for whips and barspins.

  10. #10
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    BBH height is kind of weird. I was discussing this on BS w/ some riders. It is kind of a variable # unless you are talking Hardtail. Because different suspension systems sag depending on design. That is to say you could have a frame listed 14.5" BB that actually rides @ 13.5 or lower. So I ride the East Coast but this # doesn't concern me as much as it used to. Plus clearing some trees and rocks will be a minor bonus for me compared to ability to rail more easily--- to me that is where the fun is. We'll see as the field trials begin for this rig.

    Also, I don't see it as bike park only. I see it as woodstyle riding too. Just not pure XC machine. The Preston is the do it all.

    My thinking on the lineup:

    DirtBag: Hucks
    Preston: XC w/ Lt freeride small drops... probhably a better all around rig
    BR: Freeride, jumping, 4X
    GrandMal: DH

  11. #11
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    Bottom Bracket

    I agree that BB height is kind of a weird number. The lower your BB is, the lower the bike is in general. While I agree that the wheels dictate a good deal of the height, a low BB will bring everything low when the suspension compresses.

    But, if you are going to be railing 4x style trails, jumps and whatnot where you are not going to whack your pedals and crank arms on rocks, it looks like a sweet ride. If I could afford more than just the Preston, I would be interested in a Bottlerocket too. But for now, the budget only allows me one $1000 frame at a time. Oh well.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenmacheen
    Also, I don't see it as bike park only. I see it as woodstyle riding too. Just not pure XC machine. The Preston is the do it all.

    My thinking on the lineup:

    DirtBag: Hucks
    Preston: XC w/ Lt freeride small drops... probhably a better all around rig
    BR: Freeride, jumping, 4X
    GrandMal: DH
    I agree that it's not a park only bike. I think when people call this park they are thinking crankworks park, not skatepark. Crankworks is basically big hucks but with big tranny's. Need some suspension to smooth things out and take some of the hit but too much is gonna hinder you. Last years winner was on a CowanDS which is a 4 inch travel DJ'r.

    My thinking on the lineup goes something like this:

    Trail or Park: Pure jumper and urban
    Vagrant: Burly freeride hartail, built for trails and urban
    Preston: Best all arounder with an emphasis on freeride. Won't hesitate on a 6-8 ft drop.
    BottleRocket: Slopestyle bike designed with Whistler style park terrain.
    Dirtbag: Freeride hucker
    Gran Mal: No holds Freeride and DH rig. The big squish.

    What's really sweet about Transitions lineup is how all their bikes tend to overlap into the next models sweetspot.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
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    Fillmoe that is a sweet Preston build.

    Honestly I'm torn on their line-up between that and the new BR.

    What is the deal w/ your bike ? A weight and build specifics would be great.

    Here is my current rig (not a good shot) :
    Last edited by greenmacheen; 12-27-2006 at 09:22 AM.

  14. #14
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    This pick is when I first picked up the frame in February and built it up with basically all the parts that came on my stock 05' Kona Cowan except for the forks, derailluer, and headset. I'm slowly upgrading parts on it and going to be swapping the older parts back to the Cowan to use as a urban and light trail machine. Since this pic I added the pedals, bar ends, 8" rotor and another specialized chunder tire. Current build weight came in at 38.6 pre 2.5 DH tire so it's probably in the 39 pound range at the moment. It's definately on the heavy side of Preston builds but it sees abuse and keeps going. Hopefully i'll be able to lighten it up this year as I get new parts but I'm not super concerned as long as it doesn't get over 40lbs.

    Small 05' Transition Preston
    Fox 36 Talas RC2
    Sun Ditch Witch rims (soon to be replaced by TBC revolution)
    2.5 Specialized Chunder front, 2.3 rear
    King headset
    Trutativ Hussefelt cranks
    Trutativ bars
    Trutativ stem (soon to be Temple stem)
    Trutativ seatpost
    Kona Jackshit chainguide 36t (soon to be MRP)
    Shimano 105ss derailluer
    Kona DJ seat
    Kona QR
    Hayes HFX9 8" front 6" rear
    Transition Stepdown pedals
    Odi lockons
    TBC bar ends

  15. #15
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    Fill that is a great bike. I thought you were going to list a lighter weight though. That DJ gear is heavy stuff.

    Where I ride is rolling New England terrain. There are zero sustained climbs. It is like hiking Colorado vs NH totally different. eg: different programs on a treadmill...climb vs intervals.

    I have mostly a patch work up/downs until you reach a semi-peak... For my riding I find lighter weight is neccesary to make the short blast technical climbs. You really can't slug it out w/ them over time. Its more a fullblast effort then rest before the next. So <35# is a good #. Gotta be able to get to speed quick.

    I think that is where I'm at (unofficial 33) on my bike. I didn't spend crazy money trying either. Just made sure every part was 1) light 2) tough. Going to try like hell to keep the BR down there too. Should work out I have the frame @ 9.5 in my mind w/ a tuned Vanilla RC & Ti ?

    Might go on a online bike builder and add it all up today.

  16. #16
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    Yeah my tires are probably an extra 2 lbs since they are 2 ply DH. The seat is probably pretty heavy also. Not sure about the rims but maybe some TBC revolutions coupled with a Hadley hub will bring some of the weight down. The 105 derailluer is on the heavy side also. The seat and rims will go first and see how light that makes it. I know i could go back to lighter tires but it's a sacrifice i'm willing to make since I hate flats on the trail and i'm also running stans.

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