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  1. #201
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    Like the orange spacers. Nice touch!
    Cheers
    Bill in Roswell, GA

  2. #202
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    A Wolverine has been on my build radar. Kind of glad I waited until now as apparently the new forks are stronger (so I've read).

    I will build with dirt drops, Shimano 10 sp bar ends, wide range 2x10 with XTR clutch RD, CX70 FD. For keeping things field-repairable, I'll go with TRP Spykes. Have 'em on the MTB with Ice rotors and the feel is better than cheap hydro brakes, esp. if you use good quality compressionless housing and slick cables.

    One thing I've noticed reading through all the builds mentioned: everyone wants wider tires while using 700 rims. Why not 650B rims to get a wider tire? My original plan was to use 650B wheels. Just curious why on one has gone there yet.

    By the way, some buddies on the west coast told me that Merry Sales responds to phone calls (Pacific Time) much better than they respond to email.

    Cheers,
    Bill in Roswell, GA
    Last edited by roadscrape; 01-09-2017 at 01:48 AM. Reason: was should be as

  3. #203
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadscrape View Post
    One thing I've noticed reading through all the builds mentioned: everyone wants wider tires while using 700 rims. Why not 650B rims to get a wider tire? My original plan was to use 650B wheels. Just curious why on one has gone there yet.

    By the way, some buddies on the west coast told me that Merry Sales responds to phone calls (Pacific Time) much better than they respond to email.

    Cheers,
    Bill in Roswell, GA
    Good luck with the build. A heads up from me would be to check compatibility with your bar end shifters and rear derailleur if you're going the Shimano route. I also wanted 2x10 and bar end shifting. I have Dura Ace bar ends which are wonderful, but they are not in the Shimano Dyna-Sys group which is the new mtb system. I had a Deore XT derailleur but had to use a Wolftooth Tanpan to change the ratio for proper adjusting. It was a hassle, shifted poorly, was bulky and caused heel strike. So I switched to a 105 road derailleur. Of course, shifting is much better but now I'm limited to 32t low cog due to the medium cage.

    On your 650 point: Also, I am considering the 650b build (27.5"). I built my bike up with beefy 700, 36h Sun Rhyno lites (ironically, not lite, v heavy). Acceleration is sluggish with thick tires. I would like to have a smaller diameter for more zippy commuter bike, which is what I do on my Wolverine 99% of time.

    If you're riding gravel people say the 29er can smooth out the roughs and bumps better due to its wheel diameter. Just depends on your intents with the bike.

    Post pics when you get it built!

  4. #204
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    I have a quick question to Wolverine builders: for a person measuring 5 ft 11 inches (180 cm) which Wolverine size would be advised for a more sporty build? Size 54? Size 52?

    I would usually pick a 56 but with Soma I'm confused by the elongated top tube (as compared to seat tube).

  5. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadscrape View Post
    One thing I've noticed reading through all the builds mentioned: everyone wants wider tires while using 700 rims. Why not 650B rims to get a wider tire? My original plan was to use 650B wheels. Just curious why on one has gone there yet.
    Soma has some info on its blog about 650b conversion for the Wolverine.

    Soma Feed: Guide to 650B Conversions on Soma Frames

  6. #206
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    What wheelset is everyone using with their wolverine?

  7. #207
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    I built my wheels. DT 350 hubs, DT comp spokes, DT brass nipples and Velocity Chukkers in 32 hole.

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  8. #208
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    Shimano Deore XT hubs and Sun Rhyno Lite 36h rims

  9. #209
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    Has anyone had any success getting the Tubus Tara front low rider rack on the Wolverine? I cannot get my rack to clear the front disc caliper bracket, and if I mount on the eyelet at the front of the fork, I cannot remove my wheel without removing the rack each time.

    Is anyone has been successful getting a rack on the front fork, let me know! Please post pics of Tara mounted to Wolverine front fork brake side detail. Would be super helpful.

    Thanks, fam

  10. #210
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    You do get that you can use spacers, right?

    Google foundinthemountains. I believe his blog has a buttload of pictures of him running a Tara on the Wolverine.

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  11. #211
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    @Agwan beat me too it - Morgan Taylor has successfully mounted Tubus Tara on the Wolverine.

  12. #212
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    Yeah, also, I ran a Surly Nice Rack on my Wolverine. It was just way too much rack for my needs.

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  13. #213
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    You do get that you can use spacers, right?

    Google foundinthemountains. I believe his blog has a buttload of pictures of him running a Tara on the Wolverine.

    Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
    Roger that. I just wanted to see what other people had done. Spacers solve the problem but increase shear stress on the bolts. I'll just keep an eye on them when loaded.

    Agreed that Nice Racks are overkill, but the top deck is nice. I'm probably going to upgrade to the Janndd Extreme front.

  14. #214
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    I am also thinking of building a bike with Wolverine frame. This would be my first build, as so far I only had completely built bikes. I am 6' 4" with 37" inseam, and my ape index (arm span minus height) is 2". I am thinking to go with 62 frame as I will be using a flat bar and I don't like long stems.

    The bike will be 1 x 11. I plan to use the following components. PLEASE let me know if you see anything stupid!

    - Custom built wheels using White Industries CLD hubs and HED Belgium Plus rims (the wheel builder will decide on spokes, I have no preference)
    - Continental Top Contact II 37-622 tires
    - SRAM PG-1170 Cassette 11-36
    - SRAM S700 shifter
    - SRAM Force 1 rear derailleur, long cage
    - SRAM PC-1170 chain
    - Specialites TA Vega cranks, 180mm
    - Specialites TA 110 BCD spider
    - Wolf Tooth 110 BCD Cyclocross Chainring 48T
    - Phil Wood square tapper stainless steel bottom bracket
    - VT VX Trail pedals
    - Shimano Deore XT hydraulic disk brakes/brake levers/disks
    - Chris King headset - anybody knows which model is compatible with Wolverine frame/fork?
    - Selle Anatomica X Series seat
    - Modolo Mohican bar or a flat bar from LBS
    - Generic seatpost/stem from LBS

    All comments are welcome

  15. #215
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    Quote Originally Posted by boriss111 View Post
    I am also thinking of building a bike with Wolverine frame. This would be my first build, as so far I only had completely built bikes. I am 6' 4" with 37" inseam, and my ape index (arm span minus height) is 2". I am thinking to go with 62 frame as I will be using a flat bar and I don't like long stems.

    The bike will be 1 x 11. I plan to use the following components. PLEASE let me know if you see anything stupid!

    - Custom built wheels using White Industries CLD hubs and HED Belgium Plus rims (the wheel builder will decide on spokes, I have no preference)
    - Continental Top Contact II 37-622 tires
    - SRAM PG-1170 Cassette 11-36
    - SRAM S700 shifter
    - SRAM Force 1 rear derailleur, long cage
    - SRAM PC-1170 chain
    - Specialites TA Vega cranks, 180mm
    - Specialites TA 110 BCD spider
    - Wolf Tooth 110 BCD Cyclocross Chainring 48T
    - Phil Wood square tapper stainless steel bottom bracket
    - VT VX Trail pedals
    - Shimano Deore XT hydraulic disk brakes/brake levers/disks
    - Chris King headset - anybody knows which model is compatible with Wolverine frame/fork?
    - Selle Anatomica X Series seat
    - Modolo Mohican bar or a flat bar from LBS
    - Generic seatpost/stem from LBS

    All comments are welcome
    that chainring is huge. do you live in a really flat area? is the square taper bb required to get these cranks you want? otherwise i'd avoid that. you don't need the long cage derailuer to use that cassette. also force? i don't know if there is a sram flat bar shifter that will actuate that rd. you'd want one of their mtb rds. i also would get bigger tires.

  16. #216
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    @zmjones, thanks for the suggestions. I live in a really flat area. You would need to ride for 100km through a desert to get to mountains, which I don't plan ever doing. If I move to less flat area, I'll swap it for smaller one or a double.

    I was thinking Force would be better suited as I will mostly ride on pavement. Force 1 groupset has flat bar shifter, the S700.

    I am open to suggestions regarding the crankset, my only requirement is 180mm crank length. TA Vega is the only one I am aware of.

  17. #217
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    Anyone know the official torque specs for those drive side seat stay bolts that allow for a belt drive? If not, what would you recommend?

  18. #218
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    I'm really having an issue with my front brake howling. I've tried everything. And it is not contaminated. Starts howling after a couple hard breaks even with me rotors and organic pads. I think it has to do web the harmonics of the front fork. Rear break has never made a sound. Had anyone wise experienced this? I know this fork flexes alot. And i wonder if that had something to do with it

  19. #219
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    Fork flex will not make your brakes howl, ever.

    It's not a thing that happens.

    This fork flexes more than I like, but it's not a particularly flexy steel fork. Caliper alignment, leaking pistons, thinking it is not contaminated when it is. Using incompatible rotors and pads. Being Sram, incorrect break in procedure, the wrong adapter...

    All of those things can lead to brake howl. But it isn't going to be "fork harmonics"

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  20. #220
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    Avid bb7. Set up correctly. Multiple times.. The rear. No noise. Never had to mess with them.. Front. Nothing I do makes them quite down. You can hear the howl resonate from the spokes and everything. The bike shop was at a loss when i takes with them and showed them.. Pads are spotlesss.

  21. #221
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    Just an FYI. When the fork flexes you can watch it change the relationship of the caliper to disk alot. Part of why I'm thinking it's the fork. And it's only hard breaking that causes it. And that is when the fork not only flexes but actually twists at the caliper mount.

  22. #222
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    Yeah, Avid is Sram. Like I said, being Sram is a common cause of brake squeal. I'm not joking. Pads can look spotless and not be. Also, even the slightest of contaminants can cause Avids to howl, and no amount of decontamination will cure it. The only truly permanent solution I've found for people that buy that out dated brake, is to swap in some EBC gold pads and Shimano rotors.

    It's not the fork. I do this for a living. You bought extremely tempermental and somewhat outdated brakes.

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  23. #223
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    I have the shimano rotors. Made the noise with brand new pads twice. The rear never make a sound.. I will try the ebc gold pads and report back. Thank you

  24. #224
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    I would love to be able to use hydro shimano breaks, but with drop bars and shifter brake combo or stand unless I'm willing to spend alot more money, then this is the best solution.

  25. #225
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    If the sliding drop outs are a pain, then you are definitely not experienced in any kind of bicycle with horizontal/adjustable drop outs. They're the lowest maintenance option available for such a bike.
    Agwan.

    Have you seen any official torque specs for the 4 bolts that tighten the sliding dropouts. I know paragon posts some specs for their dropouts but I read that the Wolverine dropouts are made by Tange. I am a new Wolverine owner. I plan slam to dropouts all the way forward (650b wheels) so I am not work about alignment but I was wondering how tight to crank the bolts.

  26. #226
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    Not everything has a precise torque spec. Especially huge chunks of Aluminum and steel covered in paint that may or may not effect the friction coefficient. I'd go with Paragons torque spec if you feel the need to torque these drops to a specific number. Otherwise, get them very tight.

    Also, Paragons titanium bolts for their sliders will fit the tange ones, and they're fantastic.

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  27. #227
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    Anyone out there have that black frame? Or the thru axle fork yet?

  28. #228
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    I am in the middle of the build of the orange wolverine with the thru axle fork. Unfortunately I am still waiting for some parts to arrive, so the 3/4 bike is decorating my living room for now.

    As soon as I get the bike complete I'll post the picture and share impressions of the thru axle fork.

  29. #229
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  30. #230
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    Soma Wolverine Builds-french-fit.jpg
    Name:  body measurements.PNG
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    Hi, I tried the online bike fit calculator, seems like its pointing to 56cm frame, but seems like its a bit small. I read others taller than me fits a 58cm frame.
    https://www.competitivecyclist.com/S...ke.jsp#results

    Any suggestions? I prefer to have a more upright posture while cycling.

    TIA
    Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

  31. #231
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    Hey everyone, I also have a 'fit' question. I can't stop thinking about the Wolverine, but I'm a shortie at 5'3". The Soma website says the 50cm frame fits 5'4" and taller.... I am hoping to build it with 650b wheels which will help with standover, but I can't help but wonder if the reach will be too long. Am I a fool to buy this bike based on my size?!

  32. #232
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    Anyone have an idea of how much weight a Soma Wolverine can handle? I am 220 lbs. and will use this bike to haul one kid attached at the fork crown using a Yepp Mini Ridealong seat and tow two more kids with a trailer. Curious if this bike is up to the task or if I should convert my Redline Monocog Flight to do this.

  33. #233
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    Quote Originally Posted by MinesPunk View Post
    Anyone have an idea of how much weight a Soma Wolverine can handle? I am 220 lbs. and will use this bike to haul one kid attached at the fork crown using a Yepp Mini Ridealong seat and tow two more kids with a trailer. Curious if this bike is up to the task or if I should convert my Redline Monocog Flight to do this.
    The Wolverine frame is a bit beefier being that it's intended use is Monstercross ish, but that is a question best asked directly to Soma IMO.
    Rigid SS 29er
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    "Fully rigid" isn't a thing.

  34. #234
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    Thanks for the quick reply. I will check with them

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  35. #235
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    Soma came back and let me know the frame can handle my weight. They aren't sure about using a fork crown mounted kid seat so I will stick the slightest kid there when needed. Anyone have sizing recommendations for someone 6'1" and a 34" pants inseam? Torso and arms are proportional to my height

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  36. #236
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    I've put together a list of people's sizes and frames they bought with some additional info over how these fit together, all here: https://www.reddit.com/r/SomaFabrica...olverine_size/

    I hope that helps, as it's a tricky issue.

  37. #237
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    Hey guys. I seen this thread while trolling the internet and thought I would share my build after a long vacation from these forums. I built this last december when I sold my Vassago Fisticuff frame and fork and bought the Wolverine frame and fork. What a beauty to ride. So smooth and forgiving.

    FWIW I am 6' tall with equal proportions and I am riding a 58 with an 80 mm Salsa guide stem/cowbell bars. I was told by many that a 56 frame size would fit me but my LBS said I would be better on a 58. I hesitated but trusted him and glad I did cause he was right! Had one loaded overnight tour so far and this thing rides awesome loaded or empty.
    Soma Wolverine Builds-soma2.jpg

  38. #238
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Hey guys. I seen this thread while trolling the internet and thought I would share my build after a long vacation from these forums. I built this last december when I sold my Vassago Fisticuff frame and fork and bought the Wolverine frame and fork. What a beauty to ride. So smooth and forgiving.

    FWIW I am 6' tall with equal proportions and I am riding a 58 with an 80 mm Salsa guide stem/cowbell bars. I was told by many that a 56 frame size would fit me but my LBS said I would be better on a 58. I hesitated but trusted him and glad I did cause he was right! Had one loaded overnight tour so far and this thing rides awesome loaded or empty.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	soma2.jpg 
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    I think I'm about the same size as you. Mind sharing your inseam length and what specifics drove you to the 58 instead of 56? Thanks in advance

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  39. #239
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    Quote Originally Posted by MinesPunk View Post
    I think I'm about the same size as you. Mind sharing your inseam length and what specifics drove you to the 58 instead of 56? Thanks in advance

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
    I was 6' 1/2" officially 8 years ago. At 46 I can't guarantee I haven't shrunk some lol . I have a 34" inseam and I am proportionate between my upper and lower torso so nothing looks longer or shorter than it should be lol. I had a Vassago Fisticuff prior that was an x large. I never could decide if that bike was too big for me or not. When I was at a Trek dealer in Omaha, on a Sunday to mail my frame and fork to the gent that bought it, I asked a workers opinion on what size frame they thought a guy like me might fit on. The guy asked my dimensions and looked at me and said I looked like a 56 would be a good size for me. I ordered the frame from my regular LBS, whom I have ridden with plenty of times and knows me fairly well, and I told him what I was told and he said he thought otherwise that a 58 would be a better choice. He gave various reasons regarding body angle, and other factors. I was hesitant. He said it was up to me that he could order a 56 for me if I wanted. I really trusted this guy so I took his advice on the 58. Honestly I think a 56 would have worked for me as well but this 58 is still one of the best riding, most comfortable bikes I have ever owned. Sorry for the long winded novel but you asked why I chose a 58 and I wanted to be specific. FWIW the ETT on this 58 wolverine is 6 mm longer than the ETT on my X Large Vassago that I sold. Even so it still feels comfy. Some of that is surely due to the awesome raked front fork and lower BB drop on the Wolverine. What can I say......It is a sweet sweet ride.

    Edit...You notice my spacer stack? I wonder how many spacers I would need on a 56 to get my bars at the level I prefer? Another reason you might look into a 58. 140 mm HT length on a 56 vs a 165 on a 58.

  40. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Nice! Welcome back.
    Rigid SS 29er
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    "Fully rigid" isn't a thing.

  41. #241
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    I was 6' 1/2" officially 8 years ago. At 46 I can't guarantee I haven't shrunk some lol . I have a 34" inseam and I am proportionate between my upper and lower torso so nothing looks longer or shorter than it should be lol. I had a Vassago Fisticuff prior that was an x large. I never could decide if that bike was too big for me or not. When I was at a Trek dealer in Omaha, on a Sunday to mail my frame and fork to the gent that bought it, I asked a workers opinion on what size frame they thought a guy like me might fit on. The guy asked my dimensions and looked at me and said I looked like a 56 would be a good size for me. I ordered the frame from my regular LBS, whom I have ridden with plenty of times and knows me fairly well, and I told him what I was told and he said he thought otherwise that a 58 would be a better choice. He gave various reasons regarding body angle, and other factors. I was hesitant. He said it was up to me that he could order a 56 for me if I wanted. I really trusted this guy so I took his advice on the 58. Honestly I think a 56 would have worked for me as well but this 58 is still one of the best riding, most comfortable bikes I have ever owned. Sorry for the long winded novel but you asked why I chose a 58 and I wanted to be specific. FWIW the ETT on this 58 wolverine is 6 mm longer than the ETT on my X Large Vassago that I sold. Even so it still feels comfy. Some of that is surely due to the awesome raked front fork and lower BB drop on the Wolverine. What can I say......It is a sweet sweet ride.

    Edit...You notice my spacer stack? I wonder how many spacers I would need on a 56 to get my bars at the level I prefer? Another reason you might look into a 58. 140 mm HT length on a 56 vs a 165 on a 58.
    You and I have the exact same dimensions and proportions. I appreciate you taking the time to provide such a detailed answer. I am also leaning towards the 58 since I don't like to feel cramped on bikes. This will mainly be a touring/towing rig for me when I sell my 19.5 inch Redline Monocog Flight. I have noticed many people have a lot of spacers on the wolverine, I prefer a slammed stem aesthetic so I think going with a 58 is my better option. Figure it may also let me try out some alt bars to keep myself from getting bored in the future.

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  42. #242
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    Quote Originally Posted by MinesPunk View Post
    You and I have the exact same dimensions and proportions. I appreciate you taking the time to provide such a detailed answer. I am also leaning towards the 58 since I don't like to feel cramped on bikes. This will mainly be a touring/towing rig for me when I sell my 19.5 inch Redline Monocog Flight. I have noticed many people have a lot of spacers on the wolverine, I prefer a slammed stem aesthetic so I think going with a 58 is my better option. Figure it may also let me try out some alt bars to keep myself from getting bored in the future.

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    I used to feel that way about slammed spacer stacks but lately have been migrating towards the traditional Randonneuring type of look. UW and u won't regret buying a Wolvie!

  43. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Nice! Welcome back.
    Thanks.

  44. #244
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    I used to feel that way about slammed spacer stacks but lately have been migrating towards the traditional Randonneuring type of look. UW and u won't regret buying a Wolvie!
    I definitely dig the look but also enjoy the steering feel. As I age I am sure my back will require more spacers and I will become less aggressive in my riding. Towing my twin 20 month old boys has already helped with that to an extent

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  45. #245
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    Quote Originally Posted by MinesPunk View Post
    I definitely dig the look but also enjoy the steering feel. As I age I am sure my back will require more spacers and I will become less aggressive in my riding. Towing my twin 20 month old boys has already helped with that to an extent

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    Getting old's a ***** lol

  46. #246
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    Thought I'd throw my build into the mix. I'm starting out SS, but someday will add gears in the back (1x). I love this bike so far!

    Soma Wolverine Builds-img_20170409_180236-1-.jpg
    Soma Wolverine Builds-img_20170216_072900.jpg

    • 52cm Wolverine with Soma Fork (I'm 5'8")
    • FSA Pig Headset Black, 1 1/8"
    • SRAM /TruVativ Team GXP Bottom Bracket
    • SRAM FC S350-1 GXP X-Sync Chainring 42 Tooth
    • NINER COGALICIOUS COGS 20T Rear Cog
    • Wheels: Giant P-XC29-2 rims/Tracker hubs
    • Shimano Tiagra/Sora R400 Road Brake Lever Set
    • Tires: Challenge Gravel Grinder Race 700x38
    • SRAM PC-870 6/7/8 Speed Chain Silver/Gray,
    • Shimano XT SM-RT86 6 Bolt Ice-Tech Rotor 6 Bolt Style, 160mm
    • Shimano Cyclocross BR-CX77 Disc Brake Calipers
    • WTB Rocket Race Saddle Black, 142mm
    • Ritchey Comp Link Alloy Seatpost Black, 27.2, 400
    • Fizik Endurance Bar Tape Black

  47. #247
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    Quote Originally Posted by traff_ss View Post
    Thought I'd throw my build into the mix. I'm starting out SS, but someday will add gears in the back (1x). I love this bike so far!

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    • 52cm Wolverine with Soma Fork (I'm 5'8")
    • FSA Pig Headset Black, 1 1/8"
    • SRAM /TruVativ Team GXP Bottom Bracket
    • SRAM FC S350-1 GXP X-Sync Chainring 42 Tooth
    • NINER COGALICIOUS COGS 20T Rear Cog
    • Wheels: Giant P-XC29-2 rims/Tracker hubs
    • Shimano Tiagra/Sora R400 Road Brake Lever Set
    • Tires: Challenge Gravel Grinder Race 700x38
    • SRAM PC-870 6/7/8 Speed Chain Silver/Gray,
    • Shimano XT SM-RT86 6 Bolt Ice-Tech Rotor 6 Bolt Style, 160mm
    • Shimano Cyclocross BR-CX77 Disc Brake Calipers
    • WTB Rocket Race Saddle Black, 142mm
    • Ritchey Comp Link Alloy Seatpost Black, 27.2, 400
    • Fizik Endurance Bar Tape Black
    Nice!

  48. #248
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    Sheared Chain Stay

    Beware wolverine riders!

    Soma Wolverine Builds-img_3535.jpg

  49. #249
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    Quote Originally Posted by sellwinerugs View Post
    Beware wolverine riders!

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    Definitely need the story on how this happens and whether Soma warranties the frame

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  50. #250
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    I know of one other guy this happened to, Soma warrantied it quickly. I'd get ahold of them.

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  51. #251
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    This isn't really a Wolverine issue, I've seen it happen to a lot of steel gravel bikes. It's what we get when we ask a road bike to also be a mountain bike. It should still be warrantied regardless. Awol has it happen once in a blue moon as well.

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  52. #252
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    Was there any indication that this was starting to happen or did it just snap suddenly? Did it cause you to get in a bad wreck? Hopefully nobody was hurt. Were you off roading or were you just simply riding on gravel?

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    Yes, SOMA is replacing the frame, no questions asked. I was not riding hard or even pedaling hard. I use my Wolverine mostly as commuter, and was riding home from work on a flat road. I think this kind of flaw is unacceptable, though I have heard of it happening before.

    I'm glad I wasn't a) far from home, b) in a place where there was no other way to get home, and c) not going faster or in heavy traffic or rough-roading.

    SOMA is requesting that I cut the frame in half and send them a picture. They say they can't be responsible for this frame any more now that it's compromised.

    I would prefer to repair the chainstay ($200 local frame builder, totally worth it) and sign a release waiver saying I wouldn't sue for any future damage, but they insist I destroy the frame.

  54. #254
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    Quote Originally Posted by sellwinerugs View Post
    Yes, SOMA is replacing the frame, no questions asked. I was not riding hard or even pedaling hard. I use my Wolverine mostly as commuter, and was riding home from work on a flat road. I think this kind of flaw is unacceptable, though I have heard of it happening before.

    I'm glad I wasn't a) far from home, b) in a place where there was no other way to get home, and c) not going faster or in heavy traffic or rough-roading.

    SOMA is requesting that I cut the frame in half and send them a picture. They say they can't be responsible for this frame any more now that it's compromised.

    I would prefer to repair the chainstay ($200 local frame builder, totally worth it) and sign a release waiver saying I wouldn't sue for any future damage, but they insist I destroy the frame.
    Soma's frames are built in Taiwan which is a good thing apparently for imported frames. Tange Prestige tubing is also supposed to be stronger and lighter (The steel walls are thinner) and I believe it may also be heat treated where as standard 4130 is not? Someone feel free to chime in and correct me if I am wrong. It is possible that the frame manufacturer got a bad batch of tubing. I am not sure if they receive it heat treated or if they heat treat it after assembly? Either way I am guessing it was either a bad batch or a faulty heat treatment as it appears to have broken in the middle not at a weld.

    Theres another member of this forum, who I cannot remember his name, that had a Soma Juice snap in half on the TT several years ago. It was all over the internet of course and some others stated that "this was not the first one they have heard of" at the time. But I believe I heard that Soma remedied the issue and I have not heard of anything since. I also have a B Side V3 and have put it through some fairly rough paces and even some hard jumps and so far , knock on wood, it is still going strong.

  55. #255
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Was there any indication that this was starting to happen or did it just snap suddenly? Did it cause you to get in a bad wreck? Hopefully nobody was hurt. Were you off roading or were you just simply riding on gravel?
    This was a quick snap. No indication that there was anything wrong. I am a fastidious bike owner, and I inspect my frames regularly. This was a flaw with the steel, I'm thinking some imperfection in the actual metal.

    I think SOMA underspec'd the strength of the chainstays in an attempt to keep weight lower.

  56. #256
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    Quote Originally Posted by sellwinerugs View Post
    This was a quick snap. No indication that there was anything wrong. I am a fastidious bike owner, and I inspect my frames regularly. This was a flaw with the steel, I'm thinking some imperfection in the actual metal.

    I think SOMA underspec'd the strength of the chainstays in an attempt to keep weight lower.
    Could be although the Wolverine frame set is not their lightest. It weighs more than my B Side frame does, I believe, but I could be wrong.

  57. #257
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Soma's frames are built in Taiwan which is a good thing apparently for imported frames. Tange Prestige tubing is also supposed to be stronger and lighter (The steel walls are thinner) and I believe it may also be heat treated where as standard 4130 is not? Someone feel free to chime in and correct me if I am wrong. It is possible that the frame manufacturer got a bad batch of tubing. I am not sure if they receive it heat treated or if they heat treat it after assembly? Either way I am opting for either a bad batch or a faulty heat treatment as it appears to have broken in the middle not at a weld.

    Theres another member of this forum, who I cannot remember his name, that had a Soma Juice snap in half on the TT several years ago. It was all over the internet of course and some others stated that "this was not the first one they have heard of" at the time. But I believe I heard that Soma remedied the isue and I have not heard of anything since. I also have a B Side V3 and have put it through some fairly rough paces and even some hard jumps and so far , knock on wood, it is still going strong.
    It broke at the vent hole on the inside of the chainstay. Not sure what those holes are for, perhaps a manufacturing hole?

  58. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by sellwinerugs View Post
    It broke at the vent hole on the inside of the chainstay. Not sure what those holes are for, perhaps a manufacturing hole?
    They are to let moisture drain out. Any time, from my past steel experience, that you have a hole, you can have what they call "stress risers". If the hole had a tiny tiny edge that was not perfectly round for some reason, say a round hole with one section having an "angle" in it like an octagon (manufacturing defect obviously) then that could have caused a stress riser that weakened the frame at that point and allowed it to snap. Thats why a part with a smooth radiused edge will be stronger than one with a 90 degree edge.

  59. #259
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    This isn't really a Wolverine issue, I've seen it happen to a lot of steel gravel bikes. It's what we get when we ask a road bike to also be a mountain bike. It should still be warrantied regardless. Awol has it happen once in a blue moon as well.

    Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
    What do you mean "when we ask a road bike to also be a mountain bike"? Are you referring to geometry compromises?

    I have only taken this bike off road a few times (literally less than 5 times), and those were smooth gravel rides. I commute on city streets 99% of time. I don't abuse my bikes. If a frame can't hold up to that, I don't want it. I think this was just a bad batch of Tange.

  60. #260
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    That's a common point of failure. I broke my Kona Unit chainstay clean through last year at the vent hole just like yours. It's likely not a design flaw, or a tubing defect, but a welding error. It's not hard to over-heat a tube when tig welding and weaken the tube.

    Some bad info above. That is definitely in the heat affected zone from welding and likely contributed to the failure.

    How old is your frame? Was it treated internally with frame saver?

    The vent holes on the chainstay are to allow gas to escape during the welding process, they're on the side of the tube, not the bottom like a drain would be. The only time a hole is meant to drain fluid is if it's at the bottom of a tube or a drain hole in the bottom of the BB shell, which i've drilled into a couple frames myself. I live and ride in a wet environment frequently and want to let the water out.

    This kind of thing happens. If it was a design flaw it would be more common. it's scary but wouldn't stop me from buying one, which i'm still considering.

    I'm glad Soma is taking care of you. I would respect their wishes and destroy the frame. All manufacturers request this and most require you to cut the BB out of the frame and ship it to them. (alternately, if you decide to have it repaired and it fails, don't post it all over the internet. That's their biggest fear, aside from someone getting injured.)

    Frame Saver the new frame. It's unlikely you'll get another defect, but it's worth it to me for piece of mind if you plan to keep the frame long term.
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  61. #261
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    That's a common point of failure. I broke my Kona Unit chainstay clean through last year at the vent hole just like yours. It's likely not a design flaw, or a tubing defect, but a welding error. It's not hard to over-heat a tube when tig welding and weaken the tube.

    Some bad info above. That is definitely in the heat affected zone from welding and likely contributed to the failure.

    How old is your frame? Was it treated internally with frame saver?

    The vent holes on the chainstay are to allow gas to escape during the welding process, they're on the side of the tube, not the bottom like a drain would be. The only time a hole is meant to drain fluid is if it's at the bottom of a tube or a drain hole in the bottom of the BB shell, which i've drilled into a couple frames myself. I live and ride in a wet environment frequently and want to let the water out.

    This kind of thing happens. If it was a design flaw it would be more common. it's scary but wouldn't stop me from buying one, which i'm still considering.

    I'm glad Soma is taking care of you. I would respect their wishes and destroy the frame. All manufacturers request this and most require you to cut the BB out of the frame and ship it to them. (alternately, if you decide to have it repaired and it fails, don't post it all over the internet. That's their biggest fear, aside from someone getting injured.)

    Frame Saver the new frame. It's unlikely you'll get another defect, but it's worth it to me for piece of mind if you plan to keep the frame long term.
    Very helpful comment! Thank you. Frame was purchased in August 2016. I have never heard of Frame Saver, but I will treat my new bike. I hope to have the bike a long time. I love my Wolverine and can't wait to be back in the saddle on one. For now I'm riding my vintage tourer "Townie." Just not the same . . .

  62. #262
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    ugh, that sucks. I was hoping it was older. At least i broke mine on a chunky offroad downhill. I beat the snot out of that thing and it finally gave up.

    if it's any consolation, I broke three frames last year. two steel and one aluminum. like I said, shit happens.
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  63. #263
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    That's a common point of failure. I broke my Kona Unit chainstay clean through last year at the vent hole just like yours. It's likely not a design flaw, or a tubing defect, but a welding error. It's not hard to over-heat a tube when tig welding and weaken the tube.

    Some bad info above. That is definitely in the heat affected zone from welding and likely contributed to the failure.

    How old is your frame? Was it treated internally with frame saver?

    The vent holes on the chainstay are to allow gas to escape during the welding process, they're on the side of the tube, not the bottom like a drain would be. The only time a hole is meant to drain fluid is if it's at the bottom of a tube or a drain hole in the bottom of the BB shell, which i've drilled into a couple frames myself. I live and ride in a wet environment frequently and want to let the water out.

    This kind of thing happens. If it was a design flaw it would be more common. it's scary but wouldn't stop me from buying one, which i'm still considering.

    I'm glad Soma is taking care of you. I would respect their wishes and destroy the frame. All manufacturers request this and most require you to cut the BB out of the frame and ship it to them. (alternately, if you decide to have it repaired and it fails, don't post it all over the internet. That's their biggest fear, aside from someone getting injured.)

    Frame Saver the new frame. It's unlikely you'll get another defect, but it's worth it to me for piece of mind if you plan to keep the frame long term.
    You're right that was some bad information on my part and I apologize. Come to think of it I do remember hearing that those holes were for gas to escape when welding some years ago but I had forgotten all about that. I didn't use frame saver on my Wolverine frame but it is the first steel frame I have bought that I didn't do that too. I wonder if I shouldn't buy a can and strip my bike back down to the bare frame and go ahead and treat it?

  64. #264
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    No big deal, minor difference.

    BTW it's not a bad idea to cover those holes with electrical tape. just make sure the frame is good and dry so your not trapping moisture in there.
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  65. #265
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    No big deal, minor difference.

    BTW it's not a bad idea to cover those holes with electrical tape. just make sure the frame is good and dry so your not trapping moisture in there.
    Stupid question but can a hollow tube frame build up condensation from temperature differences over time? If not and you wanted to block the holes just stick a little dab of silicone in there or something

  66. #266
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Stupid question but can a hollow tube frame build up condensation from temperature differences over time? If not and you wanted to block the holes just stick a little dab of silicone in there or something
    yeah, there's all kinds of ways for moisture to get in there. seatpost, BB, vent holes, rack/fender/bottle cage mounts. That's why if you live in a wet climate (especially salty) it's important to coat the inside of the frame IMO. Some manufacturers put drain holes in the bottom of the BB shell. I've even seen them on aluminum frames. It's not a bad idea.

    Many new steel frames are coming with the ED coating inside the frame which helps, but frame saver (or Boeshields T-9 I've read) is the best way to protect the frame.
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  67. #267
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    Lemond poprad
    Specialized Awol
    Specialized rockhopper
    Specialized Stumpjumper
    Soma Wolverine
    Kona jake
    Kona Honky Tonk
    Surly cross check
    Surly steamroller

    I can go on, a heat treated tube got overheated while being welded. Because steel has to be welded by hand. And humans are imperfect. None of those bikes are bad. Just a few bikes I've seen this failure on.

    Because human error is to blame, it should still be warrantied. But it is not evidence of a nefarious systemic failure or design flaw.

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  68. #268
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    you can add Salsa El Mariachi to that list, and every Lynskey ever made.

    I've also recently seen 3-4 carbon frames with cracks including good names like Niner and Pivot.

    I've talked to a few frame builders recently, a couple of which were not fans of tig welding. they favored filet brazing because it uses much less heat and thus does not weaken the tubes as easily. Of course a skilled builder can use any method or material, but there is a certain failure rate on mass produced frames made overseas. stuff happens.
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  69. #269
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    you can add Salsa El Mariachi to that list, and every Lynskey ever made.

    I've also recently seen 3-4 carbon frames with cracks including good names like Niner and Pivot.

    I've talked to a few frame builders recently, a couple of which were not fans of tig welding. they favored filet brazing because it uses much less heat and thus does not weaken the tubes as easily. Of course a skilled builder can use any method or material, but there is a certain failure rate on mass produced frames made overseas. stuff happens.
    Surprisingly my Lynskey road bike is still going strong. I am expecting to sell it soon. At this point I need good customer support. Can't get that with Redline anymore so the Lynskey and Monocog are on the chopping block and the Wolverine will likely replace them both

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  70. #270
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    Quote Originally Posted by MinesPunk View Post
    Surprisingly…
    exactly, seems people just buy them expecting them to crack. They made a TON of frames and honestly i have no idea if their failure rate is any higher than anyone else, but I sure do hear about it a lot. I was temped by the low prices recently but was strongly warned to steer clear.

    I know there are plenty of happy customers out there though. Hard to hate on a Ti frame at those prices. besides, in many cases it can be welded.
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  71. #271
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    exactly, seems people just buy them expecting them to crack. They made a TON of frames and honestly i have no idea if their failure rate is any higher than anyone else, but I sure do hear about it a lot. I was temped by the low prices recently but was strongly warned to steer clear.

    I know there are plenty of happy customers out there though. Hard to hate on a Ti frame at those prices. besides, in many cases it can be welded.
    Yeah, it has been a great bike for me. If it accepted discs and wider tires I would never get rid of it. I am lucky enough to not need any custom geometry and that bike fits me like a glove

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    My current setup
    1x11 with XT rd and Microshift MTB bar end - works perfectly!

    36t Wolftooth chainring, definitely easy to spin out on flat ground, but climbs easy enough.

    Finally got some compressionless housing for the Spyre brakes, and bumped up to a 180mm front rotor, RT56, as specified by Shimano for the pads in the Spyre. Tektro levers work much better with these brakes than 5700 too - I think the Shimano SLR pull ratio is not standard road pull ratio. All in all, it definitely stops well enough, but still nowhere nearly as well as a halfway decent set of hydraulics. Kinda lusting over the new Hylex RS, would love to hear some real reviews, if anyone here has used them.

    I also up-ed the tires, and went with the Nine Lines - super fast big tires, and they ride great with 25psi. Still rocking the WTB i23 with XT hubs, pretty great setup for me. Soaks up all the rough roads Oakland can dish up, with nary a hiccup. Not much room for mud though, and I've been thinking about going with something smaller to be able to slide the axle further forward.

    This bike is pretty much in Commute mode for good now, since I recently bought an MTB to handle off-road duties. Hence the Blackburn rack, to carry my daughter in the baby seat, and the Saint pedals, for easy neighborhood rides.

    Also curious about the new thru-axle fork. I would love to stiffen up the front end, but SOMA claims tire clearance would take a hit - not sure how I feel about that, but I suppose it would probably be fine with a normal size gravel tire, which I will probably switch to when I wear out these Nine Lines. Anyone out there have the new fork installed yet, and if so, how is it? Definitely curious about tire clearance, stiffness compared to the original fork, and overall worthiness - is it worth the $200 plus a new wheel/hub?

  74. #274
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    New Soma Wolverine build - loving it!

    Soma Wolverine Builds-fullsizeoutput_56e4.jpg
    Not sure if this pic of my new build posted... but I'm loving her so far!

  75. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmf17 View Post
    Not sure if this pic of my new build posted... but I'm loving her so far!
    Pic posted - I dig the black and brown theme!

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    I do too - though I feel I need to introduce some colour somewhere lol! I'm going to load her up soon for a weekend overnighter so my extra gear should do the trick

  77. #277
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    good to see some new pics, needing inspiration! planning a new commuter build and have come here for ideas

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    I am very interested in the Wolverine, but I have a concern about the short head tube. I see lots of pics with tons of stem spacers. I am one of those guys with shorter legs and a long torso. I used to have a Schwinn Fastback CX that had a compact frame and a 57cm top tube and a 155mm head tube and I still had to put several spacers under the stem. Any feedback on that?

  79. #279
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    It's not custom tuned to your body. The headtube is a couple centimeters taller than a Stragglers, but it is what it is. If you have an issue with the aesthetics. You'll need to make that choice on your own.

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  80. #280
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    UPDDATE

    Quote Originally Posted by sellwinerugs View Post
    Beware wolverine riders!

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    I got my frame in the mail (no new fork though). Had to pay $50 to get BB shell threads chased and headset and bottom bracket swapped over at my local shop because I am not a bicycle mechanic. Luckily for me I was able to get the other components on but will probably spend another $30 - $40 on a tune up to make sure it's all in place.

    I contacted SOMA hoping they would cover these costs, but they can only warranty the frame.

    Can someone explain why should a customer should be out another $80 - $90 of their own money for a defective frame that SOMA sold them?

    Customer service at SOMA is poor at best. Does not bode well for future relationship between me and SOMA. Should have gone with the Straggler.

  81. #281
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    Quote Originally Posted by sellwinerugs View Post
    UPDDATE



    I got my frame in the mail (no new fork though). Had to pay $50 to get BB shell threads chased and headset and bottom bracket swapped over at my local shop because I am not a bicycle mechanic. Luckily for me I was able to get the other components on but will probably spend another $30 - $40 on a tune up to make sure it's all in place.

    I contacted SOMA hoping they would cover these costs, but they can only warranty the frame.

    Can someone explain why should a customer should be out another $80 - $90 of their own money for a defective frame that SOMA sold them?

    Customer service at SOMA is poor at best. Does not bode well for future relationship between me and SOMA. Should have gone with the Straggler.
    You got a free replacement frame, IMO they took care of the customer. Most companies will make you pay for shipping of the replacement frame, and your on your own for parts swap/assembly. You can't reasonably expect them to do much more. Your experience would not be any different with another company.

    shit happens, frames break. Instead of being sour, enjoy your shiny new frame. Treat it with frame saver, and smile every time you ride it. Otherwise perhaps you should take up jogging.
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  82. #282
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    Quote Originally Posted by sellwinerugs View Post
    UPDDATE



    I got my frame in the mail (no new fork though). Had to pay $50 to get BB shell threads chased and headset and bottom bracket swapped over at my local shop because I am not a bicycle mechanic. Luckily for me I was able to get the other components on but will probably spend another $30 - $40 on a tune up to make sure it's all in place.

    I contacted SOMA hoping they would cover these costs, but they can only warranty the frame.

    Can someone explain why should a customer should be out another $80 - $90 of their own money for a defective frame that SOMA sold them?

    Customer service at SOMA is poor at best. Does not bode well for future relationship between me and SOMA. Should have gone with the Straggler.
    I think part of the labor should have been covered by the shop - SOMA can help them out directly too. A skilled mechanic with proper tools should be able to swap parts in less than an hour - pretty sure my shop would cover that cost. But, I also bought my frame and most of my parts from them, not to mention 2 other bikes, and a ton of tires, tubes, and random other things.

    That whole process should have been somewhat streamlined though - you take the broken frame back to the shop that you bought it from, they swap parts, and next day you walk out a happy customer.

    But shit happens, every shop is different, and SOMA has always been a little "whatever" about their customers. Sorry you didn't have a better experience.

  83. #283
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    You got a free replacement frame, IMO they took care of the customer. Most companies will make you pay for shipping of the replacement frame, and your on your own for parts swap/assembly. You can't reasonably expect them to do much more. Your experience would not be any different with another company.

    shit happens, frames break. Instead of being sour, enjoy your shiny new frame. Treat it with frame saver, and smile every time you ride it. Otherwise perhaps you should take up jogging.
    You've got a point, I am generally happy with the bike, but I'm not just some whiny sissy. I essentially paid $100 more than any other Wolverine rider for the privilege of having a defective frame.

    Edit: Situation has been amicably resolved with SOMA.
    Last edited by sellwinerugs; 1 Week Ago at 04:01 AM.

  84. #284
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    Quote Originally Posted by sellwinerugs View Post
    Edit: Situation has been amicably resolved with SOMA.
    Glad to hear they took care of you.

    Unrelated, here's a random question for the Wolverine crowd... does anyone else's sliding dropouts not align quite perfectly? If I put the rear axle all the way forward or all the way back in the sliders, the wheel won't quite align in the chainstays. Nudging the NDS forward a few mms or the drive side aft a few mms fixes this. Bike rides fine, tracks straight, and has no signs of cracks. Been like this since day one. I did the "string around the seat tube" and "string around the headtube" alignment tests, and it seems straight as an arrow on my pretty low tech test.

    Again, not a huge concern for me, just wondering if anyone else's is like this too.

  85. #285
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyStein View Post
    Glad to hear they took care of you.

    Unrelated, here's a random question for the Wolverine crowd... does anyone else's sliding dropouts not align quite perfectly? If I put the rear axle all the way forward or all the way back in the sliders, the wheel won't quite align in the chainstays. Nudging the NDS forward a few mms or the drive side aft a few mms fixes this. Bike rides fine, tracks straight, and has no signs of cracks. Been like this since day one. I did the "string around the seat tube" and "string around the headtube" alignment tests, and it seems straight as an arrow on my pretty low tech test.

    Again, not a huge concern for me, just wondering if anyone else's is like this too.
    Yep mine is the same way. I believe my fisticuff was as well. I asked my LBS who ordered my frame for me and he explained it as something to do with being built that way to account for torque and flex. He knew what he was saying but I just cannot remember exactly how he put it. He said most frames are built that way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Yep mine is the same way. I believe my fisticuff was as well. I asked my LBS who ordered my frame for me and he explained it as something to do with being built that way to account for torque and flex. He knew what he was saying but I just cannot remember exactly how he put it. He said most frames are built that way.
    Thanks for the background info, I've never heard that before. Still seems strange that the sliders aren't perfectly square though. Definitely threw me for a loop when I first built it up and saw that the wheel didn't sit evenly between the stays with the sliders at either extreme end. I almost thought my wheel was dished weird at first! Thanks again for the info!

  87. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyStein View Post
    Thanks for the background info, I've never heard that before. Still seems strange that the sliders aren't perfectly square though. Definitely threw me for a loop when I first built it up and saw that the wheel didn't sit evenly between the stays with the sliders at either extreme end. I almost thought my wheel was dished weird at first! Thanks again for the info!
    You're welcome. It threw me for a loop as well that's why I asked LOL

  88. #288
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    I call BS on this. By this rationale, you should set your wheel out of alignment to account for torque or flex? It's just production tolerance.

    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Yep mine is the same way. I believe my fisticuff was as well. I asked my LBS who ordered my frame for me and he explained it as something to do with being built that way to account for torque and flex. He knew what he was saying but I just cannot remember exactly how he put it. He said most frames are built that way.

  89. #289
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    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy View Post
    I call BS on this. By this rationale, you should set your wheel out of alignment to account for torque or flex? It's just production tolerance.
    No you don't set your wheel out of alignment. He is saying that when his wheel is centered it does not appear to be centered in the sliders. It is a tiny tiny amounts only the anal people will notice it.

  90. #290
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    are we sure this is not a wheel dish issue? I understand minor manufacturer defects, most frames have them, but I've not heard of intentionally offsetting dropouts for torque.
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  91. #291
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    are we sure this is not a wheel dish issue? I understand minor manufacturer defects, most frames have them, but I've not heard of intentionally offsetting dropouts for torque.
    No actually what prompted me to ask my LBS was.....being EXTREMELY ANAL (maybe too much).....I noticed that when I had the wheel centered in the chain stays, not only was the sliders a tiny bit off but it wouldn't necessarily be centered either on the upper part of the seat tube or on the seat stays. If I centered it up high it was off fraction down low. By fraction I mean maybe a 32nd of an inch. Nothing to worry about but I thought my frame was "twisted" slightly. My bike shop mechanic assured me that a lot of frames seemed to be this way. He said his Vassago Jaberwaky was the same way. I may have erred when I said "he knew what he was saying". Let's put it this way, when I asked him the question, he wasn't surprised or didn't look like he was clueless. He immediately had an answer. I think he was saying that it was very common or "normal" and I think he was assuming it was something to do with what he told me. He is good friends personally with Tom, who owns Vassago cycles, so maybe Tom had told him this once? I don't know this but I am just guessing at where he may have heard the info that he gave me.

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    I'm planning a wolverine build and I'm trying to decide between QR and thru-axle -- those who have built up with thru-axles, which hubs and axles did you use? The frame specs say 135x10 in the rear, and from what I can tell Hope hubs are pretty much the only option. Or can you fit a 142x12 somehow? Seems like you'd have to bend the frame out?

    Any opinions whether the new thru-axle fork is worth it? I plan on using it for a good cross section of riding... road, gravel, touring.

  93. #293
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    I'm no expert but I never understood what you gained by going with a thru axle on a bike like this. It's not like you're putting it through the stuff you're going to be putting a full suspension mountain bike through where you need the extra stiffness. This is just me asking a question someone help me understand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rrrrrok View Post
    I'm planning a wolverine build and I'm trying to decide between QR and thru-axle -- those who have built up with thru-axles, which hubs and axles did you use? The frame specs say 135x10 in the rear, and from what I can tell Hope hubs are pretty much the only option. Or can you fit a 142x12 somehow? Seems like you'd have to bend the frame out?

    Any opinions whether the new thru-axle fork is worth it? I plan on using it for a good cross section of riding... road, gravel, touring.
    You can get different sliders for the rear drop outs to get 142x12 - easy swap. SOMA used to have the part #s you needed on their site too, but I think they took them down a while ago. I bet they would tell you though, if you emailed.

    I am also curious about the thruaxle fork - SOMA says that tire clearance is reduced, which might not be ideal for me. But, the regular qr fork is super flexy, so I am tempted to try the thru axle fork anyway. If you build one, let us know how it goes!

  95. #295
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    I'm very tempted by the thru axle fork also. That front fork under my weight flexes alot when I'm breaking and I think that adds to the front break squeal.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyStein View Post
    You can get different sliders for the rear drop outs to get 142x12 - easy swap. SOMA used to have the part #s you needed on their site too, but I think they took them down a while ago. I bet they would tell you though, if you emailed.
    Sure, but the frame itself is made to fit a 135mm wide hub. So adding a thru-axle dropout doesn't change that. How do you get an extra 7mm? Seems like I'm missing something obvious here

    The paragon site also says that you can use the 142mm axle on a 135mm frame/hub, but does this mean that 7mm of the axle sticks out on one end?

    I suppose the obvious option is to perhaps use a thru-axle fork and a standard QR hub in the back.

  97. #297
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    Quote Originally Posted by rrrrrok View Post
    Sure, but the frame itself is made to fit a 135mm wide hub. So adding a thru-axle dropout doesn't change that. How do you get an extra 7mm? Seems like I'm missing something obvious here

    The paragon site also says that you can use the 142mm axle on a 135mm frame/hub, but does this mean that 7mm of the axle sticks out on one end?

    I suppose the obvious option is to perhaps use a thru-axle fork and a standard QR hub in the back.
    I think the sliding dropouts are offset to make the extra width. The frame stays the same, the dropout is shaped differently than the 135mm ones. The 135mm sliders basically go straight down from the connection with the frame, and I think the 142 ones flare outward from the frame. Maybe someone who actually has them can clarify/post a pic?

  98. #298
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyStein View Post
    Glad to hear they took care of you.

    Unrelated, here's a random question for the Wolverine crowd... does anyone else's sliding dropouts not align quite perfectly? If I put the rear axle all the way forward or all the way back in the sliders, the wheel won't quite align in the chainstays. Nudging the NDS forward a few mms or the drive side aft a few mms fixes this. Bike rides fine, tracks straight, and has no signs of cracks. Been like this since day one. I did the "string around the seat tube" and "string around the headtube" alignment tests, and it seems straight as an arrow on my pretty low tech test.

    Again, not a huge concern for me, just wondering if anyone else's is like this too.
    mine same, but its no big deal. but, the up and down axis of rear dropouts is not straight. i use a small, approx 1mm pc of plastic, inserted between axle and dropout on disc side, to make the wheel centered between the seat stays

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    Quote Originally Posted by joesno-flats View Post
    mine same, but its no big deal. but, the up and down axis of rear dropouts is not straight. i use a small, approx 1mm pc of plastic, inserted between axle and dropout on disc side, to make the wheel centered between the seat stays
    That's a good idea! I thought about filing the paint off the inside of one side of the dropouts, but I like your idea better.

  100. #300
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    Quote Originally Posted by rrrrrok View Post
    Sure, but the frame itself is made to fit a 135mm wide hub. So adding a thru-axle dropout doesn't change that. How do you get an extra 7mm? Seems like I'm missing something obvious here
    The dropouts are different but still fit in the frame. Each side is offset 3.5mm to accommodate the wider hub.

    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyStein View Post
    I think the sliding dropouts are offset to make the extra width. The frame stays the same, the dropout is shaped differently than the 135mm ones. The 135mm sliders basically go straight down from the connection with the frame, and I think the 142 ones flare outward from the frame. Maybe someone who actually has them can clarify/post a pic?
    close, not flared, just offset.

    Quote Originally Posted by joesno-flats View Post
    mine same, but its no big deal. but, the up and down axis of rear dropouts is not straight. i use a small, approx 1mm pc of plastic, inserted between axle and dropout on disc side, to make the wheel centered between the seat stays
    That's not a great idea. It sounds like the dish on your rear wheel is off, not that the dropouts are off. Take your wheel to a bike shop and have it checked.
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