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  1. #1
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    RP23 PSI for XCL

    I have XLC with the RP23. I am dialing in the rear suspension. I weigh 210 lbs with gear and I have the PSI set at 130 - It still seems a little harsh. I am wondering what PSI other riders have set for the RP23.

  2. #2
    nerfherder
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    I don't really pay attention to the PSI... I go off of sag. Sorry, not very helpful.

  3. #3
    I'm on fire.
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    Hmmm...I'm about 190 with gear, and set my RP23 around 155psi. Feels great for trail riding with some stunts thrown in. Propedal only for extended climbs or fire roads.
    Sanity is the trademark of a weak mind.
    Cycle CNY

  4. #4
    nerfherder
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    I was just chatting with another Chumba guy and he said he runs more PSI than 130 and he's a good 40 lbs lighter than the OP. So maybe it's harsh because you're smushing the shock? I'm about a 160lbs and I'm pretty sure I'm running more PSI than 130.

    Have you set the sag properly? Sorry if it seems like a dumb question...

  5. #5
    nerfherder
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    Oh, I should mention that I'm also on a XCL and my buddy was on one recently.

  6. #6
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    I have been running lower PSI but running the propedal. I think I am going to increase the propedal and not use the propedal and check the sag. What percentage sag do you use?

  7. #7
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    I have been running lower PSI but running the propedal. I think I am going to increase the PSI and not use the propedal and check the sag. What percentage sag do you use?

  8. #8
    nerfherder
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    25-30% of the total stroke is a good starting place for a bike like the XCL.

  9. #9
    it's....
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    Quote Originally Posted by JTBAZ
    I have been running lower PSI but running the propedal. I think I am going to increase the PSI and not use the propedal and check the sag. What percentage sag do you use?
    Yikes! Yea, definitely set the sag with the PP off.

  10. #10
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    I increased the PSI to 165 and the sag is 25%. It defniitely is much better than before. Thanks for the advice. I still think the rear suspension feels a little harsh. I particularly notice the harshness on square edge bumps/ledges. I will continue to dial it in. I am thinking about maybe getting the shock pushed.

  11. #11
    wuss
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    Quote Originally Posted by JTBAZ
    I increased the PSI to 165 and the sag is 25%. It defniitely is much better than before. Thanks for the advice. I still think the rear suspension feels a little harsh. I particularly notice the harshness on square edge bumps/ledges. I will continue to dial it in. I am thinking about maybe getting the shock pushed.
    I could never get the DHX 5 air tuned quite right so I bought a RP23 and had it pushed. I set the sag and went for a ride and till this day have not touched any settings... I started my first ride wondering "I wonder how this will feel" and the next time the rear shock passed in my mind was when I was packing the bike back in the car.

    I don't remember what my air pressure is (was correct from push), and don't know if it would have felt as good even without the push treatment, but I think you can't really go wrong with push (well unlikely anyway).

  12. #12
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    I had to set the rebound to almost full fast to help get rid of the harshness.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bike Poor
    I had to set the rebound to almost full fast to help get rid of the harshness.
    Good idea - I actually had the rebound set to closer to full slow. I am going to move it to almost full fast as you suggested. Hopefully that will work. I will probably get it pushed as well.

    The XCL is an amazing bike. I have been amazed at how well this bike corners. It can be pushed very hard in the corners and it will not loose its line. I am also impressed with the versatility of this bike. - it is one of the few bikes that rides well with either a 32 or 36 fork.

  14. #14
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    I've always heard that you want the rebound set as fast as you can without having kick back problems. If it is too slow, the suspension doesn't have time to extend before the next bump and will feel harsh.

  15. #15
    nerfherder
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    So, I don't think it's about setting it close to fast or slow, but as Bike Poor said, it's setting it up so that it rebounds fast enough to deal with the next bump. If it can't extend fast enough then your 5 inch bike becomes a 4 inch bike and then a 3 inch bike. This, I think, is called "packing up" because the suspension travel gets all packed up and can't extend in time for the next hit. Then it will feel harsher.

    But you don't want it so fast that it feels like it's trying to buck you over the handlebars, either. Go find a nice rocky section and trial, dial, and tune for a half hour. It'll be worth your time.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by scruffylooking
    So, I don't think it's about setting it close to fast or slow, but as Bike Poor said, it's setting it up so that it rebounds fast enough to deal with the next bump. If it can't extend fast enough then your 5 inch bike becomes a 4 inch bike and then a 3 inch bike. This, I think, is called "packing up" because the suspension travel gets all packed up and can't extend in time for the next hit. Then it will feel harsher.

    But you don't want it so fast that it feels like it's trying to buck you over the handlebars, either. Go find a nice rocky section and trial, dial, and tune for a half hour. It'll be worth your time.

    Good info - the "packing up" makes sense and that is probably the issue I have been having. Also the rocky trail section is a good idea to tune the shock.

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