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  1. #1
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    Lapierre & USA & patents??

    Is there a patent issue why Lapierre full suspension bikes can't be found in the United States? Really like what see in the carbon Zesty. Can they be imported?

  2. #2
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    Shame really....the patent is stopping a lot of guys in NA enjoying these bikes.
    I understand the patent expires in a few years so perhaps then....
    Sure someone else with more accurate knowledge of the exact issue will post.

  3. #3
    local trails rider
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    Most Lapierre FS bikes use the Horst Link principle. Specialized managed to get that patented in USA.

    I have understood that the new DH bike is close enough to VPP. and Santa Cruz owns that in USA...

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  4. #4
    Old school BMXer
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikingboy
    Shame really....the patent is stopping a lot of guys in NA enjoying these bikes.
    If only those companies who are infringing on the patent would buck up and pay the patent owner for the technologies they're using, they could market their bikes in NA.
    May the air be filled with tires!

  5. #5
    local trails rider
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    They are not infringing. They are selling their stuff only in The Rest Of The World, where things like that are not patentable.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    They are not infringing. They are selling their stuff only in The Rest Of The World, where things like that are not patentable.

    That is just silly. No, for some reason, they did not apply for a world-wide patent when they applied, most likely.

    Happens all the time.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus
    No, for some reason, they did not apply for a world-wide patent when they applied
    Can you do that - Apply for it worldwide? I would think that Specialized would have done it if it was possible - but that's just me guessing

    I'm from EU so excuse my ignorance - Is it against the law to import a Lapierre or any other patent infringing bicycle design to US or where does it stop.

    I know that a Danish bicycle manufacturer (Pronghorn) changed a horst link design to a non-horst design when they planned to hit US. I'm curious what can you do and what can't you do over there?

    Thanks Kasper

  8. #8
    fan of maple syrup
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kasper
    I know that a Danish bicycle manufacturer (Pronghorn) changed a horst link design to a non-horst design when they planned to hit US. I'm curious what can you do and what can't you do over there?
    Scott did the same thing, converting their Genius MC from horst link to faux-bar, and their Genius RC to the Spark with faux-bar. Ransom, now replaced with Genius LT ... faux-bar. Gambler and Voltage FR, both faux-bar. All their bikes are now avail in the USA.

    Funnily, when I first bought my Genius MC in 2006, the company was calling itself ScottUSA, even though it is a Swiss company that couldn't sell it's most popular FS bikes in the USA. However they sell heaps of other stuff ... clothing, ski gear, etc.

  9. #9
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    Kasper , every country has their own laws about the patents.....you can apply to obtain the patent in the States but that patent isnīt applicable to other countries. You must apply in every country ( except in EU that you can obtain an a European patent with just one apply).

    Regards!

  10. #10
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    If you want to know what the Zesty is all about I can honestly say that I've been quite disappointed with my 2010 714 and sold it after only 3 months. Bought a Specy SJ fsr and it's a completely different world.
    I still own a Lapierre and it's a top of the line Xcontrol 910 2010 that performs incredibly,therefore I was expecting the Zesty to be nonetheless. I thought wrong,they call it AM bike but you can really feel the geometry is way too much of a XC one. A lot of Britons (LP sells big in UK) have replaced the AM tyres and they now use it as a XC bike. It really feels too big for being an efficient and agile AM rig, I could not get my head around the steroid pumped chainstay....
    I guess Lapierres looks plays an enormous difference when it comes to actually rate the bikes,because there is no doubt these rigs looks amazingly beautiful !!

    Bottom line when it comes to road bike you can't really beat Frenchies or Italians ,but if it's true MTB you're looking for stick with the american rigs.
    Again,I'm still amazed by my Lapierre Xcontrol 910,it really is a missile with a stunning look,but I would be very courious to test a Specy Epic now.
    Last edited by Devastazione; 02-14-2011 at 12:12 PM.

  11. #11
    Executive User - UK
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    Agree with the comments on the spicy and zesty being long bikes, ideal for long flowing alp recents but less nimble for uk riding, enjoying my enduro a lot more than my spicy, even with a rp2 air shock vs a cane creek double barrel. Im sure once i have a decent shock on the enduro it will eclipse the spicy massively. Horses for courses at the end of the day but my money's on the enduro moving forwards

  12. #12
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    Getting confused

    Hi, there're a few things seeming to confuse me. From Lapierre's ads, Lapierre uses "patented OST (Optimized Suspension Technology)" in its Zesty, Spicy & Froggy lines. Can anyone here tell me what patent Lapierre is refer to? US Patent or French Patent or any other? I could not find any US patent from Lapierre that is related to the OST. Only a Lapierre's US patent for its FPS (Full Power Suspension) system has been found (US7427077).

    In addition, based on a basic configuration of the OST, it is similar to that patented in the US by Renault Sport in 2002 (US6386568)...at least more similar than the old patent of Dr. Horst Leitner? Is there anything relevant here...French Connection?

    Joe




  13. #13
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    Hello everybody
    my name is claudia, from Italy
    i own a nomad C, a v10, a froggy
    and at the moment i am recovering from a broken knee
    In an italian forum this topic of the OST patent is currently generating some discussion
    it is not clear if it is a fsr, a vpp, none or both of them
    Any definitive word about t?

  14. #14
    Executive User - UK
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    My guess is that the Laprerre Zesty/Spicy/Froggy are FSR designs hence why they aren't sold in the USA due to Specialized patent protection in that territory. My Spicy felt more like FSR than VPP certainly to me too - not that I'm an authority on anything though!

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