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  1. #1
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    Is it because of Evo geometry?

    Dont know but i just cant feel a sweet spot on my Evo during downhill runs. I just feel the top tube is too short, my body tends to go forward. There are downhill that i dont have to put my butt on the back of the saddle, you know, just slide slightly backward on the saddle, but theres no more room there, just feel so top tube is too short too awkward. Im 6 feet tall riding large evo using 90mm stem.
    With the feeling of going forward, will changing to shorter stem help? (but it will make it shorter). Anyone with the same feeling with Evo, by the way i came from an XC bike , im used to a bit stretched, low position during downhill.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: mrpercussive's Avatar
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    get a shorter stem and your problem should be solved. The thing about long stems is that although it'll help you on the climbs, it is hard to pump and weight the front for corners without feeling like going over the bars... Go 50mm. How stretched out and low you are on the bike would also depend on fast and steep the terrain is... XD

  3. #3
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    Also - what model year is the frame? Definitely - you will feel more upright and slightly shorter top tube on the EVO than a XC bike - and maybe a shorter wheelbase - after a few rides, and granted this bike is set up correctly - you should be able to go a lot faster and feel a lot more confident on your descent -
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUMBAevo
    Also - what model year is the frame? Definitely - you will feel more upright and slightly shorter top tube on the EVO than a XC bike - and maybe a shorter wheelbase - after a few rides, and granted this bike is set up correctly - you should be able to go a lot faster and feel a lot more confident on your descent -
    I bought it last May this year, i think its 2009 model, the blue one. Im expecting a more upright position as this is an all mountain bike just cant find my stable center/spot on downhill runs, i feel awkward, a little moving of my ass back and im out of the saddle ( i always feel the need of a little room back there, by the way my saddle is already adjusted fully back and using a set back seatpost already. Yeah ill try a shorter stem, it may reduce my need of putting my butt back.

  5. #5
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    The other option you have to increase your effective TT is use a Thomson setback post.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUMBAevo
    The other option you have to increase your effective TT is use a Thomson setback post.
    he's already using a setback seatpost so unless chumba is getting custom offset seatposts from thomson, he's already got that covered

  7. #7
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    To far set back on the seat and you will have a major wheelie-ing issue, even with a non setback gravity seat post seems like a concentrated pedal stroke in just about any gear is all that it takes to lift the front. . .

    As you gain confidence putting your weight low and forward to keep that front wheel tracking is what you would want to do on all but the steepest rollouts. Get your body in a similar position as to what you were used to on your XC bike, but with out having your arms way stretched out. Wider bars might help with this too

    I have a 65mm or so stem on there and it feels sweeeeet. I came off a more XC oriented HT and it took me a while to find proper body position with this bike, but have found the torso down arms out giving you room to pump, extend and retract works pretty well.

  8. #8
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    As you gain confidence putting your weight low and forward to keep that front wheel tracking is what you would want to do on all but the steepest rollouts.

    Yeah, i think so. I have to build that confidence while low and forward. Need to overcome that.

  9. #9
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    Getting used a to a bike with more travel usually involves that feeling of awkwardness due to higher sag and great oscillation of the bike when hitting bump. Depending on the sag and how you ride, getting used to the motions of centering your weight while hitting bumps can take time, especially when the bike has somewhat unconventional geometry like the evo.

    Try and actively stand up more often once you get the smaller cockpit. The Evo has geometry and a suspension design aimed at more nimble handling so it may be difficult to find the sweet spot. But having ridden the evo a bit, the sweet spot is very sweet indeed.

    - Also work on fork and shock settings. It can be difficult to set them to be balanced if you weren't lucky enough to have it set that way out of the box. It makes a huge difference.
    About buying a bike:
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