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  1. #1
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    Reliable DROPPER POST?

    Ok I'm probably opening up a whole can of worms here, but I'm looking for a dropper post for my Turner 5 Spot. 30.9m seatpost. I've been looking at basically every post available, and all that I'm seeing are bad reviews on them. Is there a dropper post out there that's actually reliable for any length of time? I mean, I'm not going to lay out $200-$350 for a dropper just to have it fail in a few months, I'd much rather go without it than have a piece of junk that fails. Nor do I want something that requires tons of maintenance.

  2. #2
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    Re: Reliable DROPPER POST?

    Dropper posts are like forks and shocks. At some point service will be MANDATORY.

    KS,Reverb, etc...they all work. But you have to give them attention every so often.
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    Specialized Command Blacklite owner here.

    Likes:
    Uses a standard shifter cable and housing (no bleeding).
    Solid mechanical engagement/feel.
    Easy to disassemble and clean.
    Proven to be pretty reliable.

    Cons:
    Some people experience a broken collet (warranty issue I have not come across yet).
    Seal friction over time causes the need for a manual tug on the post every now and then.
    The saddle clamp needs to be watched as it can loosen and the saddle can rotate.
    Tiny (1mm or less) side to side play developed over time.

    Overall, most of the time the benefits outweigh the cons. It's nice though, I can remove it in 30 seconds, swap the saddle to a regular post and lose a pound if I'm riding flat trails.
    The cake is a lie.

  4. #4
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    I have had good luck with my X-Fusion HiLo once I added some carbon grip to the rail clamp.

  5. #5
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    Gravity Dropper seems to be the most reliable and low maintenance. I used one for over 4 years with no failures and limited maintenance (changing the cable once or twice). I currently run a Lev, but haven't used it long enough to give any meaningful feedback.

  6. #6
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    I have a KS Lev on my 5 Spot and feel "meh" about the whole dropper post movement.
    I'd ask yourself if you really need one. Personally, losing the saddle offset isn't worth the convenience of dropping a post without having to undo a QR. Droppers add a whole lot of complexity where there once was none. Regular posts have zero maintenance.

  7. #7
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    Thanks creeker, that's what I was thinking too after seeing all the problems with droppers... 5 Spot doesn't have a QR clamp, not sure why Turner sends them out w/o. Of course it's quite simple to get one, but I was just weighing a QR or just going all the way to a dropper.. I've always had QR, and honestly I always tended to not get off and lower/raise saddle because of interrupting my ride and getting post back to correct height/etc... so I was just thinking that perhaps a dropper is a good thing since there seems to be alot of hype about them out there and in mags/etc.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by k1creeker View Post
    I have a KS Lev on my 5 Spot and feel "meh" about the whole dropper post movement.
    I'd ask yourself if you really need one. Personally, losing the saddle offset isn't worth the convenience of dropping a post without having to undo a QR. Droppers add a whole lot of complexity where there once was none. Regular posts have zero maintenance.
    Interesting view point. I am on the fence right now about a dropper for my 5-Spot. Part of me thinks, why the heck do I need one and the other side says that it would help on some of the more technical downs and drops. But, will the added weight hurt on the climbs?
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  9. #9
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    KS LEV 150MM owner

    Added weight hasn't bothered me. I ride the same trails 3 times a week and it hasn't slowed me down. I don't have a bike computer, so my information isn't 'exacting' to those standards, but climbing remains the same, sometimes better when I want the seat out of the way, and its fun downhill.

    I'll take it off for aggressive riding out of fear of breaking it, which speaks for itself.

  10. #10
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    Reliable DROPPER POST?

    Gravity Dropper. I have replaced the cable and lubed it a few times in 3.5 years. No problems at all. All mechanical with no oil or air to leak and cause a failure.

  11. #11
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    I think it really depends on the type of terrain you frequently ride. My trails have lots of ups and downs with technical features. I am a huge fan of my 150mm LEV (and the i950 I had for over 2 years before it). Only reason I replaced the i950 was I liked the cable mounting way better on the LEV - so it was a good upgrade.

    Reliability has not been an issue - although I do annual maintenance on them (same as I do on my shocks, brakes, drivetrain etc).

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigabike View Post
    Ok I'm probably opening up a whole can of worms here, but I'm looking for a dropper post for my Turner 5 Spot. 30.9m seatpost. I've been looking at basically every post available, and all that I'm seeing are bad reviews on them. Is there a dropper post out there that's actually reliable for any length of time? I mean, I'm not going to lay out $200-$350 for a dropper just to have it fail in a few months, I'd much rather go without it than have a piece of junk that fails. Nor do I want something that requires tons of maintenance.
    If you want reliable, get a Gravity Dropper Classic. I seriously doubt you read much that to indicate they are unreliable.

    Mine is 7.5 years old. Next to zero maintenance needed. I lube the shaft once every year or two, and I have replaced the cable twice. The switch broke after 6 years, it was a $15 part. My experience is not unusual.

    I am not aware of one other post that has the track record that GD does. It is as reliable as any other moving part on your bike.

    If it makes any difference to you, I ride a 5-Spot also.

    To me, there is simply no question that the dropper is worth the cost and weight. Of course, if I had to deal with the reliability issues most posts have, I might feel differently, but with the GD it is a non-issue.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

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    maybe im a fanboy?? but I chose to buy the RS Reverb, because of Srams Tech videos and parts being catologed and available everywhere.. Even ebay is full of the parts needed to rebuild the post. All of these posts need maintenance so why not have all the info and parts available when needed..

    I love using the Reverb and it has changed the way I ride for sure. I dont care about the weight, I care about having fun and it makes my bike and the way I ride more enjoyable. + the reverb adjusts to any spot and i use that feature a lot, even for climbing really steep technical. I can lower it just about 2" for fast/flowy trails that still need pedaling to maintain speed but still have lots of sweeping hits/jumps.

  14. #14
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    Reliable DROPPER POST?

    +1 for Reverb. Smooth. Infinite adjustment. Hydraulic.

    /end thread

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  15. #15
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    Blacklite owner. I broke my KS Dropzone after a couple months. It seemed pretty finicky with cable length. What got me in the end was the seat rail clamp. I run a slightly downward angle on my seat, and the clamp didn't like to hold the rail effectively there. Seat would slide all the way back in the clamp, which fatigued and cracked the aluminum head.

    I like the idea of the mechanical and air sprung Blacklite, if you can live with a 3 position post. It just works. Same way every time. Just don't put your junk in the line of fire when you push the lever, or you may receive a blunt force vasectomy. =-0

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigabike View Post
    I'd much rather go without it than have a piece of junk that fails.
    That makes no sense. Worst case scenario with any of them is it fails and you have to send it back for warranty work while you "go without it" and use your standard post for a week or two. So you'd rather go without one entirely than face the possibility of going without one for a few rides? For what it's worth I've owned several droppers over five years and the worst I've had is going for 2 days without my first gen Reverb while Rockshox warrantied it. They knew I had a race that weekend and rush shipped a second gen post to me before even recieving my malfunctioning post. This was after a year and a half of use and it was a known problem with the first batch made. All three of my KSs have been perfect and my first gen Joplin just needed an occasional stroking to get bubbles out of it.

    If you want the most bomb-proof model that won't even risk having to finish a ride with the post down get a Specialized Command Post (1st gen or Blacklite). They use a mechanical lock that I've never heard of failing. Even if the cable snaps and/or the spring breaks/loses pressure you can manually set it in one of the three positions. Howevver, I prefer the infinite settings and non-moving cable of the KS LEV.
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  17. #17
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    GD is soooo reliable. one of the best investment.
    mine is GD turbo, built like a tank, but one of the lightest dropper post out there. very minimum maintenance, 99% always work, parts are cheap. I use it a lot during ride, been almost 3 yrs. no boot for me, the boot is ugly. GD just works. if you get it, i suggest you put cable noodle.

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    i have 2 Spesh command posts. One on an Enduro that came with it, then bought one for my stumpy.

    Had them for about a year. I ride 1-2 times a week and use the post alot every ride , switching probably too often for all kinds of terrain change.

    Yes you can just stop and lower your seat, but the stops your rhythm and breaks your groove. It makes riding a little more fun and flowy. I know that once i used it for a week on my Enduro, i had to have one on the stumpy.

    Anyway, only issue i had so far was a known issue. I didn't torque the saddle bolt enough and the saddle started tilting up once after about half the ride. Tightened the nut and all has been good.

    I agree with Duke that eventually it will need to be serviced. Its one more bill to keep your bike working.

    I found a really good deal on pb. 175 for my command post.

  19. #19
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    OP did indeed open a can of worms!! I got one for my Nomad, it made the DH a bit easier, but true it's another added complexity. I then got a 29er HT, dropped the post a little bit while on the trails (no funny bent knees) and did all the same trails without any problems on the fixed post.

    They are nice to have, but will they make a massive difference in your riding? not in my experience.

    Since they are not a huge amount of money, I would suggest giving one a try, if you are not happy with it, sell it for a minimum loss but you will have a definite answer to your question.

  20. #20
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    Dropper posts are all prone to failure, it's just in the nature of the work that they need to do vs the size they are, possibly the industry need to think about a larger seat post size across the board maybe make 32.4mm dia standard or make a new 34mm or 36mm standard.

    They are inherently fragile, yes you can use a good one like a GD for years, but if you wanted to you could induce one to fail in a few hours, just do a few 'no way' (feet off the pedals) endos and some aggressive wheelies or crash wrong and it will probably have more play than a kindergarten.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by lew242 View Post
    Dropper posts are all prone to failure.
    That's not true. Perhaps most, but not all.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    That's not true. Perhaps most, but not all.
    What I mean is yes, some might never fail 'if used as they should be', as a trail bike seat-post. However if you abuse them even the best will fail, eventually. If you can't kill yours someone heavier certainly could.

    A good quality regular seat-post is always going to be stronger less heavy and less complex. However a dropper post is massively convenient and fun.

  23. #23
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    To the OP, as said, just like your fork or shock, a dropper will need service, some sooner than others, it's a new market as such and not a lot of real long term testing. I stayed away reading all the "wrongs" with them, especially the play some can have, but then I decided time to give one a go and got an X-Fusion HiLo 100mm post. So far it's been pretty damned good IMHO, bit of play I guess side to side, like a mm or two maybe, but I don't notice it when riding.
    I'm coming off nearly 9 years riding MTBs without one, so I often approach and ride stuff without using it because I'm just not accustomed to having it there - stuff I can ride with really lowering the saddle from learning that way, but which lowering the saddle would help a bit in being able to ride it more aggressive or faster with it dropped.

    Ves, best advice I could give is to try and see if you can demo one and see how you like it. I too have never had one and not really thought it a disadvantage to have to stop and lower my normal post manually before heading down a super steep descent or roller etc, but honestly it does help keep he flow so you can just roll right on it and down without having to stop. As to the weight, I really haven't noticed it to be honest, but then again I'm riding a 34lb+/- FS.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Interesting view point. I am on the fence right now about a dropper for my 5-Spot. Part of me thinks, why the heck do I need one and the other side says that it would help on some of the more technical downs and drops. But, will the added weight hurt on the climbs?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by lew242 View Post
    What I mean is yes, some might never fail 'if used as they should be', as a trail bike seat-post. However if you abuse them even the best will fail, eventually. If you can't kill yours someone heavier certainly could.

    A good quality regular seat-post is always going to be stronger less heavy and less complex. However a dropper post is massively convenient and fun.
    By your definition, almost everything on a bike is "prone to failure".
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  25. #25
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    inter - you stated no boot, it's ugly. I know I shouldn't put form over function in some cases, but I like how my bike looks and a boot is pretty ugly, makes it look really old school. Anyway - does removing the boot cause any performance issues and/or warranty issues that you know of? Thanks

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigabike View Post
    inter - you stated no boot, it's ugly. I know I shouldn't put form over function in some cases, but I like how my bike looks and a boot is pretty ugly, makes it look really old school. Anyway - does removing the boot cause any performance issues and/or warranty issues that you know of? Thanks
    I would not remove the boot. The shaft does not seal like on a fork or shock.

    The fact that someone has gotten away without it for 3 years speaks volumes for the robustness of the design (might also have to do with where they ride), but the boot is on there for a reason.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Interesting view point. I am on the fence right now about a dropper for my 5-Spot. Part of me thinks, why the heck do I need one and the other side says that it would help on some of the more technical downs and drops. But, will the added weight hurt on the climbs?
    It'll largely depend on your terrain. I might drop mine once or twice a ride, and mostly due to the mindset that "I have it I may as well use it". I've ridden long enough at full saddle extension that I'm just used to getting behind it when needed.

    If I lived in Moab where you climb to play all the way down and usually encounter a climb or two on the way out, I'd consider it more convenient.

    It's one of those parts that's nice to have when you need it, but I'd easily give the dropper post up before any of the more important upgrades (disc brakes, modern suspension, a good wheelset, etc)

  28. #28
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    reverb owner for about a year, zero issues..

    also had a joplin (new seals) and zero problems for 1.5 years

    Persoanlly, i think they make riding more enjoyable..

    if you are on the fence buy a used joplin for less than 100 and decide if you like it
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    To the OP, as said, just like your fork or shock, a dropper will need service, some sooner than others, it's a new market as such and not a lot of real long term testing. I stayed away reading all the "wrongs" with them, especially the play some can have, but then I decided time to give one a go and got an X-Fusion HiLo 100mm post. So far it's been pretty damned good IMHO, bit of play I guess side to side, like a mm or two maybe, but I don't notice it when riding.
    I'm coming off nearly 9 years riding MTBs without one, so I often approach and ride stuff without using it because I'm just not accustomed to having it there - stuff I can ride with really lowering the saddle from learning that way, but which lowering the saddle would help a bit in being able to ride it more aggressive or faster with it dropped.

    Ves, best advice I could give is to try and see if you can demo one and see how you like it. I too have never had one and not really thought it a disadvantage to have to stop and lower my normal post manually before heading down a super steep descent or roller etc, but honestly it does help keep he flow so you can just roll right on it and down without having to stop. As to the weight, I really haven't noticed it to be honest, but then again I'm riding a 34lb+/- FS.
    Thanks LyNx. I am going to go for it. Only other concern, is my weight of close to 200lbs but I think that should be fine. Anything that increases fun can't be all that bad!
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigabike View Post
    inter - you stated no boot, it's ugly. I know I shouldn't put form over function in some cases, but I like how my bike looks and a boot is pretty ugly, makes it look really old school. Anyway - does removing the boot cause any performance issues and/or warranty issues that you know of? Thanks
    no issue at all for me. Im in Socal. I rode thru snow / mud during winter. Do you have GD? if you do, just try it for a few ride.
    no boot for almost 3 yrs. My one and only problem during a ride was when the cable broke, nothing to do with boot or no boot. That is why I put cable noodle.
    about warranty, Idk, well, I never need it tho. I did bought new inner shim and seal for like $9 after 2 yrs, not because it didnt work, but because the play has become a bit too much, inner shim was worn out, and GD recommend change the seal as well, so I did. GD customer service is one of the best out there.
    Good luck.

  31. #31
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    Giant contact switch.

    Costs 200$ and mine is going on two years without a single service. It's infinitely adjustable and is no more complicated than the cable running to your rear derailleur. I have no issues of it losing travel, getting stuck, ect. Runs as advertised without fault. Install was cake. Took it out of the box and stuck it on my bike and that's it!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by kubikeman View Post
    Specialized Command Blacklite owner here.

    Likes:
    Uses a standard shifter cable and housing (no bleeding).
    Solid mechanical engagement/feel.
    Easy to disassemble and clean.
    Proven to be pretty reliable.

    Cons:
    Some people experience a broken collet (warranty issue I have not come across yet).
    Seal friction over time causes the need for a manual tug on the post every now and then.
    The saddle clamp needs to be watched as it can loosen and the saddle can rotate.
    Tiny (1mm or less) side to side play developed over time.

    Overall, most of the time the benefits outweigh the cons. It's nice though, I can remove it in 30 seconds, swap the saddle to a regular post and lose a pound if I'm riding flat trails.
    I pretty much agree with this. My Blacklite has been in service for a year now. Iím 225, ride 2x per week pretty religiously, and probably change the height 20+ times per ride. The damn thing has surprised me by essentially being 100% reliable. It doesnít even lose air that I can tell.

    I do lube the stanchion about every 3 - 4 rides as the post will not come up as quickly when itís dry. I also run 60 psi which you are not supposed to do, but no ill effects thus far. 2 months ago, I took it apart, and everything looked fine. I just wiped off the old grease, slathered on some heavy grease, and put it back together. Pinkbike has the details on the procedure. I lubed the cable once when it started to get stiff.

    This post has a ĺ inch setback, which was a plus for my setup. If it broke tomorrow, Iíd buy another. Well worth the $250 bucks to me.

  33. #33
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    Just an FYI everyone - I contacted Gravity Dropper regarding removing the boot, below is their response. Sounds like it's OK to do, not recommended, but does not void warranty so that's all I need to hear :-) I might go with the GD, sounds like the majority opinion is in their favor. Thanks everyone very much for all the feedback.

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    GD's reply: "The boot is highly recommended in order to keep dirt and grime from accumulating inside the post. If you choose to remove the boot it will not void the warranty but may affect its performance. If you maintain the post regularly you should not have any issues."

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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by gigabike View Post
    Just an FYI everyone - I contacted Gravity Dropper regarding removing the boot, below is their response. Sounds like it's OK to do, not recommended, but does not void warranty so that's all I need to hear :-) I might go with the GD, sounds like the majority opinion is in their favor. Thanks everyone very much for all the feedback.
    good choice! if you are getting the turbo, dont forget to get cable noodle or brake noodle. I got mine off ebay. not sure if GD has it.

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    Recently put a GD Turbo LP on my 11' Spot and have been really happy with it. Get the LP and you won't need any noodle as the cable is more flexible. Purchased from Universal Cycles for $255 shipped use coupon code vip15.

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    Cope: Did you get the 4" or 5"? Thanks

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cope View Post
    Recently put a GD Turbo LP on my 11' Spot and have been really happy with it. Get the LP and you won't need any noodle as the cable is more flexible. Purchased from Universal Cycles for $255 shipped use coupon code vip15.
    Oh great, LP has difference cable now. I wonder if I can put LP cable on my old Turbo. just curious, I hv no problem with the noodle.
    Thanks for the info.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigabike View Post
    Cope: Did you get the 4" or 5"? Thanks
    I got the 5" multi position. Honestly thought 5" would be overkill, but it worked out perfectly.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigabike View Post
    Cope: Did you get the 4" or 5"? Thanks
    careful with this.. some bikes have interupted seat post tubes and can only be inserted so far.. and they cant be cut down like regular seat posts..
    BBZ

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    The Gravity Dropper is bullet proof. The other systems seem to have unnecessarily complicated mechanisms. The GD has a spring and a retaining pin. There is no need to over think this and rebuild the wheel. They have the full parts diagram on their website and anybody can rebuild the post at home...I really mean anybody.
    This is not the most gimmicky or blingy post but it is absolutely the most reliable.

  42. #42
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    Cope: Thanks much for the advice and the tip on Universal Cycles deal. I just ordered a Turbo LP from them 5" drop with the coupon code! Thanks again!

  43. #43
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    I have 2 2012 reverbs on 2 bikes, both have never broken or failed me after 6 months of frequent use on both. Also I'm 6'5" 190lbs so i probably put some odd strain on them. Great, reliable seat post IMO.

  44. #44
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    Gravity Dropper Turbo owner here for five years, back when the Joplin was the only other choice. The only failure was a broken cable some 18 months ago. Cost me four bucks and a ten minute drive to the LBS for some shifter cable and jacket. Since there's no air or hydraulics it works the same in ten degree weather as it does in 90. It's also the lightest, if not one of the lightest posts on the market. It's never dropped, sagged, stuck down or stuck up. Once it wouldn't stay down. Had to back off the collar by hand 1/8 turn (my fault). The only maintenance I've done is lube the inner tube. It's 100% serviceable and I've been meaning to replace some wear items but I say that every year.

    I defy anyone to make these claims with their post.
    CRAP... I'm in the wrong gear

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by k1creeker View Post
    It'll largely depend on your terrain. I might drop mine once or twice a ride, and mostly due to the mindset that "I have it I may as well use it". I've ridden long enough at full saddle extension that I'm just used to getting behind it when needed.

    If I lived in Moab where you climb to play all the way down and usually encounter a climb or two on the way out, I'd consider it more convenient.

    It's one of those parts that's nice to have when you need it, but I'd easily give the dropper post up before any of the more important upgrades (disc brakes, modern suspension, a good wheelset, etc)
    I view dropper-less riding as a compromise. It's easier to set up a manual with more freedom of movement, which in turn makes hopping easier. When doing a high(1.5 to 2 feet for me) hop, the seat always slaps me in the backside when bringing the back end of the bike up. The post height limits rear tire height when clearing obstacles.

    Won't matter if you ride only sanitized trails. Backcountry trails with large log overs and big boulders to mount, it comes in handy.

    You can't absorb a big hit with your body with a seat in your sternum. You can get behind the seat with a standard post on the descents, but it limits your range of motion and how much you can manipulate the bike on the way down.

    I broke mine on vacation last week. Bought the Blacklite same day so as to not compromise the riding on the rest of the trip. Game changer for me.

    Also, disc brakes and proper suspension aren't really upgrades in this category, but standard equipment. The wheelset might be a consideration, depending on what you've got. I'd ride a stock wheelset and upgrade the post first, personally.

  46. #46
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    After having a dropper (150mm KS LEV) for a short time, I view it as something I won't ever be without moving forward. It just allows me to descend so much better and much, much faster. Some don't like a dropper, but the vast majority seem to say the same thing...that they wouldn't ride without one once they install it. The KS is bomb proof so far, but again, I have only had it a few months. There is some rotational movement in the saddle, but I can't tell it's there when on the bike, only when I am off of it and trying to move it around, so I don't think that matters at all.

  47. #47
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    I've owned a LEV and a used Reverb. The Reverb gave me issues (2011 model) so I went with the LEV. The LEV was awesome for about 6 months, then it was stolen along with the rest of my bike. The only thing I didn't like about the LEV was the remote - the hydraulic actuation of the Reverb was SO nice, going to the LEV's was a bit disappointing. The Reverb was akin to operating a dimmer switch - you're able to control the speed of the descent and return by how much you push the remote. The LEV was more like an on/off switch, which resulted in some rough drops. I'm making a bigger deal of it than it was, but it's there.

    I'm going back to a Reverb on my replacement bike. From all accounts, it seems they've fixed the 2011/2012 issues.

  48. #48
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    Guessing Im in the minority a bit on my take - but my 2013 Satori came with the CB Kronolog. Lots of reported early issues etc - altho - in discussing w my LBS mech's - they believe alot of it was setup and the importance of the cable routing/angle at the clamp mechanism - i learned it firsthand when I changed out my seatpost clamp and didnt reset the cable - ended up with the slipping post. My error - not the product. That said - I've been riding the bike regularly since I bought it thanksgiving and if my gps is correct - close to 500 miles here in CO and UT - other than my error - NO issues and working flawless - also - with the tight technical and chunky i normally ride - it's made a huge diff for me - while they may not be or be needed for everyone, Ill never ride without while on my fave trails!!

  49. #49
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    The fact that people are giving praises to their dropper post for lasting 6 months without issue really hits home how just low people's expectations are for these things.

    I think all you can REALLY say with confidence after six months that it is not a totally worthless piece if sh!t. After year, you can say that it does not suck.

    After the post has lasted 3 years.... 5 years.... 7 years...... THEN you will have a worthwhile opinion on how well built it is for the long haul.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  50. #50
    North Van/Whistler
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    The fact that people are giving praises to their dropper post for lasting 6 months without issue really hits home how just low people's expectations are for these things.

    I think all you can REALLY say with confidence after six months that it is not a totally worthless piece if sh!t. After year, you can say that it does not suck.

    After the post has lasted 3 years.... 5 years.... 7 years...... THEN you will have a worthwhile opinion on how well built it is for the long haul.
    Couldn't agree more. I use droppers and am pretty amazed by how much of a junkshow dropper owners tolerate.
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

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