Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 7891011
Results 1,001 to 1,012 of 1012
  1. #1001
    mtbr member
    Reputation: spyghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    974
    Anyone here uses the elbow adjuster? I find the placement weird whether it's on the left or right of the brake lever clamp. Placement is worse as I ride with levers nearly horizontal.

    I might end up with a shifter style remote...

    Sent from my SM-J250G using Tapatalk
    Canfield Yelli Screamy

  2. #1002
    Mr. Buck E. Fikes
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,392
    I used it for a couple years without issue but now I run the KS Southpaw which eliminates use of the noodle. I'd recommend a Southpaw, especially the newest version. I've converted all my bikes over to it. They are very reasonably priced considering some of the ridiculous prices the newer aftermarket remotes are being priced!

  3. #1003
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Are you using a good spanner wrench on the fitting? I agree, it can be tough to get the threads to bite and you have to be cautious of cross threading but I use a Park Tool #2 Spanner that locks into the fitting well and allows even pressure to be applied to prevent cross thread. One thing I do is actually rotate the thread in the wrong direction (anti-clockwise) for a half turn until it indexes level and usually immediately engages correctly upon turning clockwise.
    Thanks for the reply, I figured out why it wouldn't thread. For some reason, I was thinking the bottom out bumper went inside of the cartridge, so that was preventing the cap from threading. Guess that'll teach me to follow directions better lol... Post is working great now!

  4. #1004
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    468
    I second what Oh My Sack said. I also have had a few that were difficult and definitely had to keep the actuator depressed while threading it. Make sure to do a dry run with no oil to be sure the threads arenít already damaged.

    I also seem to recall one or two LEVs where I ran into this and ultimately had to reuse the old o-ring rather than the new one. The specs SHOULD be identical and I canít explain this but if you swapped the o-ring, you may want to try with the old o-ring once if youíre still struggling.

    Good luck and let me know how it goes.

    Chris

  5. #1005
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    3
    Hi,
    can somebody tell me something about the last KS LEV SI. I have a problem to open the cartridge. At the bottom of the inner tube there is a small hole where I think is a kind of safety pin. At the moment I can not open this pin and also not open the lock cap at the bottom of the tube. Please see the photo below what I mean. Does anybody knows how to open The lock cap at the LEV Si.
    The safety pin is only at the LEV Si therefore please let me know if somebody knows for what it is.KS LEV - DIY Cartridge Rebuild-safety-pin-lev-si.jpg
    An allen key will not fit. It looks like a small round pin which is only insert to protect. There is no thread.

  6. #1006
    mtbr member
    Reputation: razorjack's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    190
    It's exactly for that, not allowing to service it at home

  7. #1007
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    468
    It also helps prevent that cap from unthreading which happens sometimes. I came across this on a LEV integra as well. If itís under warranty, send it in. If itís past warranty and your only other option is to buy a replacement cartridge anyway, there is a way to open it if you feel like trying.

    Youíll need to get a small drill and drill through that pin. Once itís gone, youíll be able to open the end cap. The hole you create will be beyond the o-ring so it wonít interfere with the seal. Obviously this voids warranty so I would only recommend this if youíre past warranty and youíve got nothing to lose.

    It looks like the damper shaft has already been removed in that photo. Did it unthread somehow or snap? If it snapped, youíll need to buy a new cartridge anyway.

    Good luck and let us know what happens.

    Chris

  8. #1008
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    3
    At this photo, I pushed the damper shaft complete inside so that a lot of oil moves out. I will try to drill out the pin with a left drilling bit ( a very small one). Or maybe I try first to cut a 2mm thread inside and screw a small 2mmbold inside to pull out this pin.
    Are you sure that this is a pin and not a screw.
    Never mind when both solutions will not work than I cut of the pin with a small drill.

    But I think only the first 1mm. That means only the length of the pin where it goes through the black tube. Please let me know if I think right.

    I will work on it in CW 43. So I try to send some photos how I open it and what solution is the best.

    CU
    Soul

  9. #1009
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    468
    When I encountered this, it looked more like a precise indent made by a machine rather than a pin or screw but Iíd probably still do the same drill technique. And yes, you only need to drill through the black part to release the cap. Good luck.

    Chris

  10. #1010
    Mr. Buck E. Fikes
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,392
    That little treat of a locking device was KS' answer to THIS thread! You can thank Chris!

    Joking aside, after so many rebuilds under my belt, and still probably far fewer than cakelly4, yhe <$60 to buy a new entire cartridge is, IMO, the best and easiest way to go. It's still DYI, you can have an extra on hand to eliminate down time because you know you can't ride without a dropper once you have, and you won't ruin anymore perfectly good t-shirts due to missed oil stains when you overexert your effort installing the damper assy! You'll see what I mean if you move forward with the rebuild.

  11. #1011
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    468
    Haha. Agreed on all points. A replacement cartridge is WAY easier...BUT...if youíre tossing this one anyway...may as well try the rebuild.

    Chris

  12. #1012
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    <$60 to buy a new entire cartridge is, IMO, the best and easiest way to go.
    I do not think that I can buy a new cartridge for the new LEV SI in Germany for less than 60$. Therefore I will try to made a service by myself. And if you did it one time it takes you maybe only 20 min. of time. At the moment I send it back to my seller because the dropper is still in warranty. If they decide that I destroy it then I will open the cartridge by myself.
    Yesterday I order a 1mm screw tap. I think I can pull out the pin very easily with that tool.

Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 7891011

Similar Threads

  1. To rebuild or not to rebuild my Marzocchi Bomber Atom Race 2001?
    By dbhammercycle in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 07-24-2016, 09:24 PM
  2. FIT cartridge rebuild tool advice
    By Rick Draper in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-17-2013, 11:57 AM
  3. When do you need a cartridge rebuild? FOX Float
    By K2krafty1 in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-27-2013, 10:48 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-22-2011, 03:35 PM
  5. Pro x cartridge Manitou shock rebuild kit
    By macker434172 in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 04-01-2011, 01:04 AM

Members who have read this thread: 341

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.