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Thread: Bikeyoke Revive

  1. #501
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    5 nm.

  2. #502
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    Quote Originally Posted by monts View Post
    And yep, I'm pretty sure i used the anti-seize your describing.
    How sure is pretty sure? This is not an insignificant detail relative to your problem

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  3. #503
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    Quote Originally Posted by DriverB View Post
    How sure is pretty sure? This is not an insignificant detail relative to your problem

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    100% sure I used anti-seize
    99% sure I used the type of anti-seize that is being described in the post.

  4. #504
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    Quote Originally Posted by monts View Post
    100% sure I used anti-seize
    99% sure I used the type of anti-seize that is being described in the post.
    Got it. I don't think the type would have much effect as long as you're using it. Anti Seize would be appropriate vs Carbon paste assuming the inside of your seat tube is aluminum. Finish Line makes this.

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  5. #505
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    Quote Originally Posted by Didzy2009 View Post
    thanks man for the info, ill drop them an email to confirm it all
    Mine is doing the same, Ti rails, pretty sure it's low torque.

    I'm using Park carbon paste but have not broke out the torque wrench, I think it's needed as we probably need to approach max torque to keep the squeaking away.

    The saddle definitely doesn't creak when it's not mounted, I don't think it's the problem.

  6. #506
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    Quote Originally Posted by DriverB View Post
    Got it. I don't think the type would have much effect as long as you're using it. Anti Seize would be appropriate vs Carbon paste assuming the inside of your seat tube is aluminum. Finish Line makes this.

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    It's a steel frame (canfield nimble 9), Sacki said to use grease (i e-mailed him).

  7. #507
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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113 View Post
    Mine is doing the same, Ti rails, pretty sure it's low torque.

    I'm using Park carbon paste but have not broke out the torque wrench, I think it's needed as we probably need to approach max torque to keep the squeaking away.

    The saddle definitely doesn't creak when it's not mounted, I don't think it's the problem.

    To fix the squeek, the saddle and mounting hardware need to be removed, cleaned, apply anti-seize anywhere metal contacts metal, carbon paste to the seat rail channels and re-assemble.

    Anti-seize should be applied to the bolt threads as well as the bottom surface of the bolt head, also inside the cavities the nuts sit inside. Doing this reduces friction and allows more torque to go to turning the bolt rather than overcoming friction. So for the same torque you get increased clamping force. This also means proper torque is lower, so be careful of this. A torque spec doesn't mean anything if the fastner isn't prepared correctly, and can vary by large amounts depending on lubrication type. For the threads it's possible assembly lube would be a better choice but without knowing how the torque specs were chosen to begin with it's all a crapshoot if you want to achieve just the right clamping force.

    In any case... no more squeeky saddle!

  8. #508
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    Quote Originally Posted by monts View Post
    It's a steel frame (canfield nimble 9), Sacki said to use grease (i e-mailed him).
    This is unfortunate it happened so quickly, even using grease!

    Penetrating oil and heat may be useful to prep, maybe not.

    You need to figure out how to hit the top of the seatpost with a large metal hammer without damaging it. Many small taps can often work instead of one big hit. Heat the frame until it's hot to the touch but don't go too far or the paint will bubble. You might also be able to grab the post with a strap-type wrench and apply some torque.

    I'm not sure there is any good way to go here except some heat, oil and force. Good luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by DriverB View Post
    Got it. I don't think the type would have much effect as long as you're using it. Anti Seize would be appropriate vs Carbon paste assuming the inside of your seat tube is aluminum. Finish Line makes this.

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    Due to the low torque that all dropper posts use (lest they bind) its not realistic to use anything other than friction paste.
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  10. #510
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Due to the low torque that all dropper posts use (lest they bind) its not realistic to use anything other than friction paste.
    Are you suggesting the 5nm max spec torque dictates friction paste, or said differently that Anti-seize paste at 5nm does not hold? I haven't installed mine yet but this would seem strange, particularly since the manual specification states friction or Anti-seize (and not grease in all caps, which increases necessary clamping force).

    Friction paste contains microspheres and should be used for carbon to decrease necessary clamp force. Anti-seize is for titanium or aluminum (but can work for other metals), and prevents galvanic corrosion and the like. It is not necessary for carbon on metal interfaces.

    Edit: from the Revive Manual:

    "Always use suitable grease on contacting faces betweenseatpost and seattube in order to avoid potential corrosion.Use friction paste only, if proper clamping is not possiblewith greased components. Contact us before applyingfriction paste."




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    Last edited by DriverB; 03-24-2018 at 12:55 PM.
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  11. #511
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    thanks, that's what we've been doing, small taps... made some progress today... hopefully soon. this is stressful

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    I serviced my Revive for the first time. I stopped noticing any excess grease at the top of my post after a ride, so I decided to crack open my post and regrease. I used Slick Honey to grease the internals.

    Some tips:

    1. I did NOT let the air out of my post before doing the service. No problems.

    2. My 7mm Stanley wrench measured 4.3mm wide v. 3.9mm for the wrench in the service video, and I couldn't fit my 7mm wrench all the way onto the wrench flats. I used an 8" crescent wrench on the other wrench flats. Luckily, the black end piece unscrewed with little force. When I reassembled, because the black end piece wasn't screwed into the end of the rod anymore, I could now fit my 7mm wrench all the way onto the flats, but when I screwed the black end piece back on and tightened, my 7mm wrench was stuck. So I had to loosen the black end piece again to free my wrench, then fit my 7mm wrench only partially on the flats, then retighten. I tightened to what I estimate was 1-2 Nm.

    3. The large snap ring is removed by squeezing the holes together. On the other hand, the small snap ring is removed by pulling the holes apart. My cheapo $7 snap ring pliers with red handles from amazon allow you to reverse the direction that the jaws move when you squeeze the handles together--you just remove the jaws and mount them on the posts on the opposite side of the pliers.

    4. I didn't think the tape was sufficient to protect the rod, so in addition to the tape I wrapped some paper towels around the rod, then folded over the top of the paper towels and taped it down. That created a hood I could slide on and off the rod.

    5. The brass rods did not fall out when I slid the inner post out of the outer post like in the service video. In fact, they were quite difficult to get out. I held some wadded up paper towels in the palm of my hand for cushioning, then I whacked the outer post against my hand to encourage the brass rods to fall out of their slots. I would suggest stuffing a paper towel in the opening at the top of the outer post, so that the rods don't fly out that end when you whack the post against your hand.

    6. I couldn't tell one side of a snap ring from the other--despite looking at them under a magnifying glass. Both snap rings looked perfectly symmetrical to me. If you want to install the snap rings exactly the way they were, carefully place the snap rings down on your work bench in the same orientation they were in when you removed them.

    7. Reassembling the white plastic ring and the large silver plate/washer was a little fiddly. I couldn't fit my fingers down into the post, so I used Q-tips to press in the white ring, and then I pressed the white ring all the way down with the silver plate.

    8. I didn't use loctite on the threads at the end of the rod as shown in the service video. There was no evidence of any loctite that had been previously applied, and because my 7mm wrench doesn't fit all the way onto the wrench flats, I didn't want to make it harder to unscrew the black end piece the next time I service my post.

    All the internal pieces looked like they were in excellent condition, however I like to have spare parts on hand before disassembling, but I couldn't find the service kits available anywhere.

    Servicing my Revive was easier than servicing my old KS Lev (external). I like how you insert the brass rods into the slots after you slide the inner post into the outer post. With my KS Lev, I had to hold the brass rods in their slots on the inner post while trying to slide the inner post into the outer post, which inevitably caused the brass rods to get knocked out of their slots. If I remember correctly, my KS Lev had three brass rods, and the Revive has six, so the Revive should resist twisting better than the KS Lev. My KS Lev had about 1mm of side to side play, which wasn't noticeable on the bike. I noticed that my brass rods had no markings on them contrary to what is shown in the animated video.
    Last edited by happyriding; 02-01-2018 at 04:46 AM.

  13. #513
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    I like how you insert the brass rods into the slots after you slide the inner post into the outer post. With my KS Lev, I had to balance the brass rods on the inner post, then try to slide the inner post into the outer post, which inevitably caused the brass rods to get knocked out of their slots in the inner post.
    This sounds so much easier, Those brass keys on a 9.8 rebuild almost drove me crazy!

    Thanks for the tips

  14. #514
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    Holy crap, just read this whole thread!
    Totally saving up for one of these!

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  15. #515
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    Quote Originally Posted by monts View Post
    thanks, that's what we've been doing, small taps... made some progress today... hopefully soon. this is stressful
    If you have'nt freed it yet, prob should break the bike down. Make it much easier.

    Have you soaked it w penetrating oil from the BB side w frame upside down? It can take a long time to get oil where you want it. Gentle heat such as w heat gun, or if you are CAREFUL enough and warm SLOWLY a torch w a bush/brush flame setting.

    The problem w tapping it w a hammer is you're driving it deeper in to the frame thereby potentially increasing the hold the frame has on the seat tube! I'd only do that as a last resort. Can you borrow or rent a slide hammer? A slide hammer pulls w each strike. You can prob make one out of some iron pipe and fittings and a way to attach to post perhaps w cable.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkerik View Post
    If you have'nt freed it yet, prob should break the bike down. Make it much easier.

    Have you soaked it w penetrating oil from the BB side w frame upside down? It can take a long time to get oil where you want it. Gentle heat such as w heat gun, or if you are CAREFUL enough and warm SLOWLY a torch w a bush/brush flame setting.

    The problem w tapping it w a hammer is you're driving it deeper in to the frame thereby potentially increasing the hold the frame has on the seat tube! I'd only do that as a last resort. Can you borrow or rent a slide hammer? A slide hammer pulls w each strike. You can prob make one out of some iron pipe and fittings and a way to attach to post perhaps w cable.
    Used heat and penetrating oil. i'm going to check in today again on it.

    I looked at a slide hammer but not sure where the best spot would be to attach it, any ideas?

  17. #517
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkerik View Post
    If you have'nt freed it yet, prob should break the bike down. Make it much easier.

    Have you soaked it w penetrating oil from the BB side w frame upside down? It can take a long time to get oil where you want it. Gentle heat such as w heat gun, or if you are CAREFUL enough and warm SLOWLY a torch w a bush/brush flame setting.

    The problem w tapping it w a hammer is you're driving it deeper in to the frame thereby potentially increasing the hold the frame has on the seat tube! I'd only do that as a last resort. Can you borrow or rent a slide hammer? A slide hammer pulls w each strike. You can prob make one out of some iron pipe and fittings and a way to attach to post perhaps w cable.
    It won't matter. Once it can move at all, it will be able to move freely up or down.

  18. #518
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    Quote Originally Posted by monts View Post
    Used heat and penetrating oil. i'm going to check in today again on it.

    I looked at a slide hammer but not sure where the best spot would be to attach it, any ideas?
    That's the hard part, isn't it. hmmm.
    Def don't want to stress the internals of the revive.

    If you can get some type of pipe clamp cushioned w a few layers of inner tube rubber (or maybe an old seatpost clamp) on the larger part of the dropper just before the collar and then girth hitch a couple loops (one each side to balance load) of cable below the clamp so it does not slide up and off the dropper post. A secure connection and straight pull is essential.
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  19. #519
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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113 View Post
    It won't matter. Once it can move at all, it will be able to move freely up or down.
    Yeah, prob right.

    Keep soaking it for sure.
    Do you have a gorilla for a friend that can stand on the frame and simply yank it out? Lol
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  20. #520
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    There might have been a small squeek from the post bottoming in the frame too. The perfect position for the post (for me) is right where it bottoms, but obviously I don't want the post to wear a hole through the frame so giving it a mm or 2 is probably a good idea, with a mark on the seatpost to make sure it doesn't get pushed all the way down as you ride.

    Anyways, went for a ride yesterday with a completely non-squeeky bike and it was nice.

  21. #521
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    I've got some Maxima 5 Fork Oil left over from servicing my KS Lev, and I wondered whether I could use it to do a full service on my Revive--when the time comes. So I did some research.

    1. 1 cSt = 1 mm2/s

    2. If you click on the big black image in sacki's post, your browser will download a pdf file that gives the specs of the stock Revive oil:

    Code:
    Viscosity index                       method=ASTM D2270     161
    Kinematic Viscosity @ 40 C, mm2/s     method=ASTM D445      15.8
    3. Maxima's reported specs:

    Bikeyoke Revive-bike_yoke_oil.jpg

    So to compare:
    Code:
                        Revive Oil     Maxima 5 Fork Oil 
                       ---------------------------------
    cSt                    15.8                15.9 
    Viscosity Index        161                 201
    That looks pretty close. But here is some independent data on Maxima 5:

    Bikeyoke Revive-maxima_oil_independent.jpg

    That info is credited to Peter Verdone Designs, but I couldn't find it on his site. For Maxima Fork Oil 5wt, it says:
    Code:
                                        Independent 
                                       Maxima 5 specs
                                       --------------              
    Recalculated Viscosity Index            98  
    (but it says Maxima reported 150)
    It seems like the Maxima 5 would work--but maybe the VI is a little low? From the Peter Verdone Designs info:

    The other interesting number is the Viscosity Index (VI), which is how stable the viscosity is over a wide temperature range. Bigger numbers are better.
    I wonder if a dropper ever gets very hot?
    Last edited by happyriding; 01-31-2018 at 09:47 PM.

  22. #522
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    Has anyone had any issues with the remote lever getting stuck?

    I rode yesterday in 20*F cold. Was doing some maintenance on the bike today in my basement and I cannot depress the lever - it gives a little bit but very stiff, and cannot depress enough to release the seatpost to drop.

    Is this somehow related to riding in cold?

    What should I do? Will it return to normal when Im back in the cold?

    Thanks

  23. #523
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    That has just been addressed just on the last page of this thread:
    Bikeyoke Revive
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  24. #524
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacki View Post
    That has just been addressed just on the last page of this thread:
    Bikeyoke Revive
    Awesome thanks!

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    Yea. Use the Revive feature to open it up. Next time drop the post a little before storing.

  26. #526
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    Yea. Use the Revive feature to open it up. Next time drop the post a little before storing.
    Do this

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    Has anyone got an issue with the anodizing on the seat post itself (the bit that goes into the seat tube)

    Mine is absolutely full of loads of missing paint presumable from my back light being attached...its only a rubber band and its totally solid so it doesnt move at all....obviously grit and mud get in there and cause this...but ive had about 10 dropper posts and not one has ever rubbed off the anodizing before...looks a right mess its only 4 weeks old...just rubbed it off straight down to the metal

    Any one elses doing this? Its literally the only thing i can fault but it hasnt had a very good long lasting finish on it

  28. #528
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    Quote Originally Posted by Didzy2009 View Post
    Has anyone got an issue with the anodizing on the seat post itself (the bit that goes into the seat tube)

    Mine is absolutely full of loads of missing paint presumable from my back light being attached...its only a rubber band and its totally solid so it doesnt move at all....obviously grit and mud get in there and cause this...but ive had about 10 dropper posts and not one has ever rubbed off the anodizing before...looks a right mess its only 4 weeks old...just rubbed it off straight down to the metal

    Any one elses doing this? Its literally the only thing i can fault but it hasnt had a very good long lasting finish on it
    I don't know if my problem had anything to do with the anodizing or not, but there was seriously nasty stuff on my post when I finally got it unstuck from my frame. I had to get a new lower tube unit. Fortunately it's an easy switch.

  29. #529
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    Quote Originally Posted by Didzy2009 View Post
    Has anyone got an issue with the anodizing on the seat post itself (the bit that goes into the seat tube)

    Mine is absolutely full of loads of missing paint presumable from my back light being attached...its only a rubber band and its totally solid so it doesnt move at all....obviously grit and mud get in there and cause this...but ive had about 10 dropper posts and not one has ever rubbed off the anodizing before...looks a right mess its only 4 weeks old...just rubbed it off straight down to the metal

    Any one elses doing this? Its literally the only thing i can fault but it hasnt had a very good long lasting finish on it
    I believe bikeyoke should replace it for free by warranty.
    No seatpost should develop this in weeks. Hell, even in years.
    Even hated-by-everyone Reverb is great regarding its anodizing durability and it can last year or two without any 'lower leg' service.

    This is quite concerning, since this seatpost is one of the priciest on the market. And if there are serious durability problems, it's not worth it at all. Better look for something mechanical (E13 for example).

  30. #530
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    This has nothing with "durability" and warranty, it's so called "electro corrosion" between 2 materials (aluminium/carbon, aluminium/aluminium) if moisture is trapped between seatpost and frame. I noticed that in any seatpost if was not properly treated, i.e. greased. To prevent from overtightening the seatclamp I prefer to use one size down seatpost diameter (i.e. 30.9 instead of 31.6mm) and U.S.E. shim 31.6/30.9. Shim has the collar so doesn't slip into the frame and can be greased on outer surface, while inner surface is grooved from machining and holds the seatube well even greased (much better than carbon frame). This solution works for me for years for standard and dropper posts, no problems with anodizing issues from electro corossion. The other advantage of a shim is the possibility to use the seatpost for all frames from 30.9mm up (when changing the frame).

  31. #531
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    This has nothing with "durability" and warranty, it's so called "electro corrosion" between 2 materials (aluminium/carbon, aluminium/aluminium) if moisture is trapped between seatpost and frame. I noticed that in any seatpost if was not properly treated, i.e. greased. To prevent from overtightening the seatclamp I prefer to use one size down seatpost diameter (i.e. 30.9 instead of 31.6mm) and U.S.E. shim 31.6/30.9. Shim has the collar so doesn't slip into the frame and can be greased on outer surface, while inner surface is grooved from machining and holds the seatube well even greased (much better than carbon frame). This solution works for me for years for standard and dropper posts, no problems with anodizing issues from electro corossion. The other advantage of a shim is the possibility to use the seatpost for all frames from 30.9mm up (when changing the frame).
    It's not in any manual to follow this procedure, so how would the customer/user know?
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  32. #532
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    It's not in any manual to follow this procedure, so how would the customer/user know?
    I suppose if one were to read up more on metals, one would learn of this?


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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    This has nothing with "durability" and warranty, it's so called "electro corrosion" between 2 materials (aluminium/carbon, aluminium/aluminium) if moisture is trapped between seatpost and frame. I noticed that in any seatpost if was not properly treated, i.e. greased. To prevent from overtightening the seatclamp I prefer to use one size down seatpost diameter (i.e. 30.9 instead of 31.6mm) and U.S.E. shim 31.6/30.9. Shim has the collar so doesn't slip into the frame and can be greased on outer surface, while inner surface is grooved from machining and holds the seatube well even greased (much better than carbon frame). This solution works for me for years for standard and dropper posts, no problems with anodizing issues from electro corossion. The other advantage of a shim is the possibility to use the seatpost for all frames from 30.9mm up (when changing the frame).
    There's no way we should have to use shims to avoid corrosion. Also, I've never had an issue with any other seat post corroding like this one did. Also, I used anti-seize. Grease seems to be working much better. Will only be using it from now on. I always used grease on my other posts, but the Revive manual states to use only Anti-Seize and not to use grease.

  34. #534
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    It is possible the formula for "antisieze" is quite different in Germany but how are we to know that.

    When i read that (antisieze) i thought it was a weird suggestion. I have been using fluid film on my aluminum frame and have yet to have any problems.

    With the dissimilar metals such as a steel alloy frame and the aluminum revive corrosion is more likely. A quality grease should work well here. I'd still check it occasionally to dry, clean and re-grease as necessary.

    Your issue with your frame may have something to do w the particular alloy they use?? IDK

    Glad to hear you got it out.
    How did you end up doing it?
    Is your frame alright?
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  35. #535
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkerik View Post
    It is possible the formula for "antisieze" is quite different in Germany but how are we to know that.

    When i read that (antisieze) i thought it was a weird suggestion. I have been using fluid film on my aluminum frame and have yet to have any problems.

    With the dissimilar metals such as a steel alloy frame and the aluminum revive corrosion is more likely. A quality grease should work well here. I'd still check it occasionally to dry, clean and re-grease as necessary.

    Your issue with your frame may have something to do w the particular alloy they use?? IDK

    Glad to hear you got it out.
    How did you end up doing it?
    Is your frame alright?
    Soaked in PB blaster, tried light force, little taps, etc. Soaked more, rode it, more of the same, nothing...finally decided to use the pipe wrench. There was no way it was coming out any other way, even with the pipe wrench I had to apply a twisting upward motion to get it out. Believe it or not, the post still works fine and the frame is fine, I honed the inside out and greased everything and it's good. I sent some pics to Canfield (steel Nimble 9 frame) and to Sacki. They were both helpful through the process so I won't post the pics here, but there was some seriously nasty junk on that post when I got it out.

  36. #536
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkerik View Post
    It is possible the formula for "antisieze" is quite different in Germany but how are we to know that.

    When i read that (antisieze) i thought it was a weird suggestion. I have been using fluid film on my aluminum frame and have yet to have any problems.

    With the dissimilar metals such as a steel alloy frame and the aluminum revive corrosion is more likely. A quality grease should work well here. I'd still check it occasionally to dry, clean and re-grease as necessary.

    Your issue with your frame may have something to do w the particular alloy they use?? IDK

    Glad to hear you got it out.
    How did you end up doing it?
    Is your frame alright?
    There are different types of Anti-Seize available everywhere. Thought auto supply stores typically only carry one. Usually the aluminum variety. I bought a big jar of the copper type through amazon after seeing instructions (I forget for what) that specifically stated not to use the aluminum kind.

    That said, you would think that if a manufacturer called for a specific type, they would specify it in their manual.


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  37. #537
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    Quote Originally Posted by Didzy2009 View Post
    Has anyone got an issue with the anodizing on the seat post itself (the bit that goes into the seat tube)
    I just got a Revive in yesterday, first one I have had my hands on. I think it is a brilliant design and I look forward to using it. But it does seem that if it has a weakness, it is in the finish. Just from a quick test fit, basically sliding the post in and out of a carbon seat tube a couple of times, a little twisting for alignment and lightly clamping, there is some visible scratching in the anodization. It is minor and won't be an issue when the post is installed, but it still shouldn't be there. I have had other anodized posts in and out of the same frame many times with no visible marks at all. Whatever anodization process Bike Yoke is using, it ain't the best. Surprising for a post that seems to be hands down the best available in just about every significant category. But the bottom line for me will be reliability and performance and I still have very high expectations for this post.

  38. #538
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    From my experience the anodisation is more durable the more "knurled" the surface is (typical example is Thomson Elite). The more polished the surface is, the worse is the situation. Maybe it's due to scratches are not so visible on knurled surface. I don't have Revive yet to judge but planning to order one before season starts.

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    Hey sacki, I just wanted to say that I've been in the market for a new dropper over the last couple weeks, and just as I thought I had settled on a Fox Transfer, I discovered the BikeYoke Revive and I just bought it from Backcountry. And I have to tell you that one of the reasons that I bought it was that I found this thread and I'm impressed with the way you have been answering people's questions promptly and thoroughly. That goes a long way.

  40. #540
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    From my experience the anodisation is more durable the more "knurled" the surface is (typical example is Thomson Elite). The more polished the surface is, the worse is the situation. Maybe it's due to scratches are not so visible on knurled surface. I don't have Revive yet to judge but planning to order one before season starts.
    The surface I noticed the scratches on is the textured surface similar to a Thomson or 9Point8 or many other posts, basically fine grooves in the machined surface. The scratches are small but there are shiny spots visible. Still, I wouldn't let this deter you, I would buy this post over anything else on the market if it were just coated in Sharpy ink. Dropper posts are probably the single most troublesome component of current bikes and I will take superior design over cosmetics any day. And actually this is a very good looking post, I don't care if there are some scratches hidden in the seat tube, I typically don't put anything on the small exposed lower section of a dropper anyway and if I do I will be careful. The one big caveat would be if the stanchion surface wears excessively, that could become both a significant cosmetic and performance issue in a hurry. Time will tell, and they have a 2 year warranty.

  41. #541
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    Quote Originally Posted by gobbledegoo View Post
    Hey sacki, I just wanted to say that I've been in the market for a new dropper over the last couple weeks, and just as I thought I had settled on a Fox Transfer, I discovered the BikeYoke Revive and I just bought it from Backcountry. And I have to tell you that one of the reasons that I bought it was that I found this thread and I'm impressed with the way you have been answering people's questions promptly and thoroughly. That goes a long way.
    Thank you so much for your kind words! It is always nice to hear, when people actually appreciate and value the support were trying to give!
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  42. #542
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    Quote Originally Posted by prosto_mtb View Post
    I believe bikeyoke should replace it for free by warranty.
    No seatpost should develop this in weeks. Hell, even in years.
    Even hated-by-everyone Reverb is great regarding its anodizing durability and it can last year or two without any 'lower leg' service.

    This is quite concerning, since this seatpost is one of the priciest on the market. And if there are serious durability problems, it's not worth it at all. Better look for something mechanical (E13 for example).
    Id like to say a few words about this topic:

    I wonder, how you come to the conclusion, we SHOULD replace this post/tube under warranty. Neither have you seen the actual look of the post, nor do you have any information besided the ones from the customer. With all due respect, this is not something you can decide by hearsay without exactly knowing, what happend to the post. Maybe the user can post a picture, so we can see, what he is talking about.
    I have worked at Bionicon Bicycles for the past 7 years, and I have installed, serviced and worked on hundreds of bikes with dropper posts from Rock Shox over KS, to Fox, Race Face, Forca, etc.
    There were posts of each munufacturer, that looked like new after years, but there were also posts, that looked extremely worn just after a few months of use. In more than 99% of the cases, it depends on how you treat your bike and post. In the other cases, it might be weirdly reacting materials and or actual badly anodized parts (very unlikely).

    Id like to explain a little bit about our anodization finish:

    1. Our seatpost experiences the same anodization treatment as many other posts from other manufactuers, performed by the same, very renowned anodization factory. I am not saying, that there cant be a mistake in the ano-finish of some posts - for sure this can happen. However, we can say, that we have less than 10 reported cases (and this is less than 0,1% of all sold REVIVES as of now), where customers complained about the finish. Some of them used the post inside a steel frame, some of them attached something to the post, some used friction paste. One major difference between our post and some others is the our machining finish, while most other do have a shotpeened finish. This can make a difference, since our post in theory contacts on a smaller area. We will do some research and see, if shotpeened finish helps to reduce the rub. Then wed have to sacrifice our perfect machining finish.

    2. Friction paste (as well as anti-seize powder or paste) can cause the anodization to fade, as the particles can be very hard and micro-movements inside the tube will work basically like sandpaper. There are many different kinds of friction paste, and I can not rule out, that some of them are more aggressive than others to ano-finish.
    In the manual we do recommend to use friction paste, that is correct. We mention this, because we have found that it (unfortunately not rarely) happens to be, that seattubes are not properly reamsed and bigger than they should be. I have had a customer complaining, that he could not properly clamp his post inside the frame. It turned out, that the seattube was 31.4~31.5 instead of 30.9. This is terribly off of any tolerances. The frame make was an expensive one and not direct sales brand by the way.
    Personally I never used friction paste on my personla bikes - I always use grease, since this will help keep water and dirt away from the "gap" between post and seattube. But if we tell the customer, to use grease, then maybe a lot of posts will be slipping. But I can also not rule out, that some grease compounds will also attack the surface. Chemical reactions between steel and aluminum, carbon and aluminum, carbon and grease, water and steel, ... can not be foreseen, so it is just impossible to give a 100% recommendation of what to use.
    I will try to find some proper words and I think will updated the manual accordingly.
    If you can clamp your post properly inside your frame with heavy grease, while making sure, that the grease is not aggressive to any of the components, then grease should always be the best solution to apply on your post. This I am saying from personal experience, but I am not saying, that this is 100% correct or applies for every single combination possible.

    3. The upper tube and lower tube have totally different surface finishes/treatments:
    Upper tube is hard anodized and lower tube is just anodized. Hard ano-layers are much thicker and harder than just "normally" anodized surfaces.

    4. Anything that is attached to an anodized surface (no matter if rubber or not) will be able to collect dirt and mud and water and this willl eventually get between the two and rub off material = anodisation layer.

    5. Steel frames do cause corrosion, especially, if the inside of the frame is humid/moist or wet. Anodized tubes (no matter if hard anodized or anodized) are pretty resistant to water and corrosion, but when corroding steel frames get in touch with aluminum seatposts, they can add oxidation layers to the post or attack the anodization. This does not come from the post, but from the steel frame.

    I hope I did not forget anything (or too much), but please feel free to ask, if you have more questions - also about other issues.
    Last edited by sacki; 02-18-2018 at 01:25 PM.
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  43. #543
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    I'm glad to hear, that Sacki's experience with greasing the seatposts meets exactly my experience. I would just add another 2 cents: if someting must be attached to the seatpost (rear light or so), it's always good to put clear 3M helicopter tape (or similar) underneath to prevent rubbing the anogization (i.e. simply wrap around the seatpost with piece of clear tape ...).

  44. #544
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    I see that some people have had this dropper for some time, sounds like this is the dropper to get. What can anyone say after having it for over 6 months or more ? I have had very bad luck with droppers and I need to buy a new one very soon. I have had a reverb (longest lasting and favorite of the ones I have) easton haven (JUNK) e13 TRS (to big 150mm stock on my capra and only 3 position not very good.

    If this is the post to get I have no issues putting down the money... but I don't want to get one and have issues in 3 months.

    I have read a lot of the posts on here, most seem great....

    Thanks
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  45. #545
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Javorsky View Post
    I see that some people have had this dropper for some time, sounds like this is the dropper to get. What can anyone say after having it for over 6 months or more ? I have had very bad luck with droppers and I need to buy a new one very soon. I have had a reverb (longest lasting and favorite of the ones I have) easton haven (JUNK) e13 TRS (to big 150mm stock on my capra and only 3 position not very good.

    If this is the post to get I have no issues putting down the money... but I don't want to get one and have issues in 3 months.

    I have read a lot of the posts on here, most seem great....

    Thanks
    I've had mine since July 2017, have not had any issues or needed to service yet. Conditions used: 1-2 rides per week, mild climate (NorCal). What I like are its smooth and rapid operation, lack of need for service, and no side to side slop. If I store it with the seat down (like on a car rack with other bikes), the first extension will be slower than normal, but return to normal after that.

    I use it with the Wolf Tooth lever, which I feel is slightly smoother and allows for an easier install, but I'm using the Triggy remote with a DeHy modded Reverb on my other bike. The Triggy isn't bad - the WT ReMote is simply the best lever on the market.

    I've previously used (and strongly disliked) Fox DOSS, KS Lev DX, and RS Reverb. I've also played with a friend's Transfer. All of those were inferior in some combination of smoothness or speed of travel, or side to side slop.

  46. #546
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    We will do some research and see, if shotpeened finish helps to reduce the rub. Then wed have to sacrifice our perfect machining finish.
    A data point: I was watching curling on TV at the olympics, and after they smoothed the ice they showed a guy spraying water droplets on the ice to create a pebbled surface. They said it made the heavy stones slide better.

  47. #547
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Javorsky View Post
    (...)

    If this is the post to get I have no issues putting down the money... but I don't want to get one and have issues in 3 months.

    I have read a lot of the posts on here, most seem great....

    Thanks
    I stopped keeping track at the 1500Km mark, I have my Revive since May last year and rode everything from moondust to 20cm deep mud. And it has been flawless.
    I did a lower service at the 1000Km mark if I'm not mistaken, and that's it.
    I make the effort to clean the stanchion after each ride as suggested, even more when I rode in the mud.

    My personal experience is that the Revive is everything that they advertise, the simpler design, the smooth action, the easy of service, the Revive function and the reliability.

    Time will tell if it keeps that way.

  48. #548
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    I've been riding mine for at least five months. It's performance has been great through mud or snow.

    I had to adjust the cable once but that's my own fault for cutting it a bit too short. Still working smooth and swift.
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  49. #549
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    Thanks guys, I have one on the way. It will be going on my 2017 Capra CF. The Capra in Large comes with 150 mm Post and it is to tall for me. Hope this post is as good as everything that has been said..... Also, how much air pressure ? And does it lose air ever ?
    Super excited to have a good post.
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  50. #550
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    The manual states 260psi max, but I saw somewhere that they come with less than that from factory, think it's around 200psi, but I'm not sure on that value. And as far as I can tell mine doesn't lose air.

  51. #551
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    After just a tiny bit of reading in this thread...... this is the dropper I'm getting.
    User serviceability is a major plus. Also, the design seems good.

  52. #552
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    A data point: I was watching curling on TV at the olympics, and after they smoothed the ice they showed a guy spraying water droplets on the ice to create a pebbled surface. They said it made the heavy stones slide better.
    My laymans understanding/guess of that curling trick is that the raised surface created by the pebbling simply reduces the contact area between the ice and the stone, thereby lowering friction. This is the same effect as machining.

    The low points in either a machined or shot peened surface would be less subject to wear than the high points.

    I would be surprised if a shot-peened surface had more low area than the current machined surface of a revive lower assembly. But truthfully Im making a wild guess here.


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  53. #553
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacki View Post

    Id like to explain a little bit about our anodization finish:

    1. Our seatpost experiences the same anodization treatment as many other posts from other manufactuers, performed by the same, very renowned anodization factory. I am not saying, that there cant be a mistake in the ano-finish of some posts - for sure this can happen. However, we can say, that we have less than 10 reported cases (and this is less than 0,1% of all sold REVIVES as of now), where customers complained about the finish. Some of them used the post inside a steel frame, some of them attached something to the post, some used friction paste. One major difference between our post and some others is the our machining finish, while most other do have a shotpeened finish. This can make a difference, since our post in theory contacts on a smaller area. We will do some research and see, if shotpeened finish helps to reduce the rub. Then wed have to sacrifice our perfect machining finish.
    ...
    3. The upper tube and lower tube have totally different surface finishes/treatments:
    Upper tube is hard anodized and lower tube is just anodized. Hard ano-layers are much thicker and harder than just "normally" anodized surfaces.
    ...
    I am glad to hear this, and thank you for being so willing to address these kinds of issues with detailed and informative replies. Maybe the scratches in the lower post I observed are the result of a sharper peak in the machined surface than the other posts I have, maybe mine got an underspec treatment, either way it is not much of a concern especially after reading your post. The hard anodization of the stanchion versus the regular treatment to the lower is a pragmatic compromise and works for me. Especially since your post allows me to run a 160mm while most of your competition could only fit a 125mm. And the lower will be as deep as it can go, so there will never be a scratched section from having had the post too deep.

    Congrats on a unique and clever design, I have high expectations and look forward to putting a lot of miles on it.

  54. #554
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    Quote Originally Posted by VonFalkenhausen View Post
    I am glad to hear this, and thank you for being so willing to address these kinds of issues with detailed and informative replies. Maybe the scratches in the lower post I observed are the result of a sharper peak in the machined surface than the other posts I have, maybe mine got an underspec treatment, either way it is not much of a concern especially after reading your post. The hard anodization of the stanchion versus the regular treatment to the lower is a pragmatic compromise and works for me. Especially since your post allows me to run a 160mm while most of your competition could only fit a 125mm. And the lower will be as deep as it can go, so there will never be a scratched section from having had the post too deep.

    Congrats on a unique and clever design, I have high expectations and look forward to putting a lot of miles on it.
    I appreciate wanting a flawless finish when new, but realistically as you ride your post over time it will develop cosmetic marks from being clamped in the seat tube, just like any other post. No big worry!

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  55. #555
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    Just installed a 160mm Revive and noticed that it wants to stop short of full extension by about 5 mm each time I raise it. I have reset it, dropper cable tension is good and seat collar it torqued to 4nm.

    Any suggestions to get it to full extension? Haven't ridden the bike yet due to weather, so maybe it just needs to break in a bit?

  56. #556
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    Quote Originally Posted by hookem34 View Post
    Just installed a 160mm Revive and noticed that it wants to stop short of full extension by about 5 mm each time I raise it. I have reset it, dropper cable tension is good and seat collar it torqued to 4nm.

    Any suggestions to get it to full extension? Haven't ridden the bike yet due to weather, so maybe it just needs to break in a bit?
    how much air is in it ? pump it up to max rated pressure in the manual
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  57. #557
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    Adding air fixed the problem. Was at 175 psi out of the box. Pumped it up to 250 and works perfect.

  58. #558
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    Quote Originally Posted by DriverB View Post
    I appreciate wanting a flawless finish when new, but realistically as you ride your post over time it will develop cosmetic marks from being clamped in the seat tube, just like any other post. No big worry!
    Yeah, I get that but this started with someone asking about the finish on the post. I have observed that this post for some reason seems more susceptible than I expected to small scratches developing in the anodization of the lower post. This is in direct comparison to other similar posts, in the same frame, from test fitting. I am not overly concerned about it as I mentioned in the previous posts, but it did surprise me.

  59. #559
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    Just ordered revive 31.6 160mm post. Currently on wait list from Jenson. Hopefully it doesnt take 2 months.

  60. #560
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumpynerd View Post
    Just ordered revive 31.6 160mm post. Currently on wait list from Jenson. Hopefully it doesnt take 2 months.
    Same price...in stock and free 2 day shipping at

    https://www.competitivecyclist.com/b...E6MTpyZXZpdmU=
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  61. #561
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    Anyone have issue with saddle dropping 1mm-3mm? I haven't had ride on my new bike and new revive yet due to traveling and weather. So I've been just upgrading and adding new parts to bike. This happened when I got it but didn't think much of it since I was going to revive it and figured it will fix it.

    I revived it yesterday and today I had to add spacers to Topaz so to set sag again, I put weight on saddle to equalize to set sag. After that I pressed on lever and I hear faint clunk. Did it couple of times more. It doesn't seem to happen if you don't put weight on it then push lever but if I compress shock couple of time then lay my hand gently on saddle and push lever, I feel saddle come up 1mm-3mm.

    Anyone experience this? Like I have mentioned, I haven't even taken this out to ride yet.
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  62. #562
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    Has anyone else had issues threading on the air tool adapter piece?
    I could not get mine on for the life of me, even after removing all the small reset parts.
    Was able to barely get my shock pump threaded on after removing all the reset parts, but what a pain in the ass.

    Other than that, great dropper post!!
    Bikeyoke Revive-b058e794-d12f-4cc7-a1ef-d403a56a442f.jpg

  63. #563
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmc1171 View Post
    Has anyone else had issues threading on the air tool adapter piece?
    I could not get mine on for the life of me, even after removing all the small reset parts.
    Was able to barely get my shock pump threaded on after removing all the reset parts, but what a pain in the ass.

    Other than that, great dropper post!!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    nope. mine went on fine.
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  64. #564
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmc1171 View Post
    Has anyone else had issues threading on the air tool adapter piece?
    I could not get mine on for the life of me, even after removing all the small reset parts.
    Was able to barely get my shock pump threaded on after removing all the reset parts, but what a pain in the ass.

    Other than that, great dropper post!!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    What exactly was the problem with the adapter not fitting? I can hardly imagine, that a pump would fit, but the adapter would not even screw on. The adapter should easily fit without having to take off the reset-parts. Did you check, if the thread of the adapter is OK? Mayve there is a mistake in the machining of the adapter thread? Never heard of this before, but I dont want to rule that out.
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  65. #565
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    Website has been updated and now contains service and troubleshooting documents, as well as links to service videos and manuals.
    You can find all those information on every REVIVE product page under "maintenance" and "documents".
    Here is a quick link to check it out:
    https://www.bikeyoke.de/en/seatpost-...-160-30-9.html

    I am also planning to open a new thread here on MTBR forums, following the model of my original thread on German IBC forum:
    https://www.mtb-news.de/forum/t/bike...tricks.864069/

    The idea is to open a dedicated thread for REVIVE, where my first post will serve as a collection of all important and helpful information. The first post will be updated and information will be added constantly. So you dont have to search throughout the whole thread, when looking for some information, as basically everything will be concentrated and collected on the first page.
    Not sure, if that works, because I havent used a lot of attachements and pictures and linked videos here, and dont know, if it is as simple to use, as in the German forum, but if it is not too complicated, Id like to go for it.
    What do you think?
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  66. #566
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacki View Post
    Website has been updated and now contains service and troubleshooting documents, as well as links to service videos and manuals.
    You can find all those information on every REVIVE product page under "maintenance" and "documents".
    Here is a quick link to check it out:
    https://www.bikeyoke.de/en/seatpost-...-160-30-9.html

    I am also planning to open a new thread here on MTBR forums, following the model of my original thread on German IBC forum:
    https://www.mtb-news.de/forum/t/bike...tricks.864069/

    The idea is to open a dedicated thread for REVIVE, where my first post will serve as a collection of all important and helpful information. The first post will be updated and information will be added constantly. So you dont have to search throughout the whole thread, when looking for some information, as basically everything will be concentrated and collected on the first page.
    Not sure, if that works, because I havent used a lot of attachements and pictures and linked videos here, and dont know, if it is as simple to use, as in the German forum, but if it is not too complicated, Id like to go for it.
    What do you think?
    I think its a great idea as these marathon threads can be a pain to parse through. Hyperlinks to docs and videos work just as well as embedding them.


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  67. #567
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacki View Post
    ...I am also planning to open a new thread here on MTBR forums, following the model of my original thread on German IBC forum:
    https://www.mtb-news.de/forum/t/bike...tricks.864069/
    The idea is to open a dedicated thread for REVIVE, where my first post will serve as a collection of all important and helpful information. The first post will be updated and information will be added constantly. So you dont have to search throughout the whole thread, when looking for some information, as basically everything will be concentrated and collected on the first page.
    Not sure, if that works, because I havent used a lot of attachements and pictures and linked videos here, and dont know, if it is as simple to use, as in the German forum, but if it is not too complicated, Id like to go for it.
    What do you think?

    Sacki, that's a good idea, surely. Such thread model is also possible in this forum too, e.g. KS LEV - DIY Cartridge Rebuild, so that should work OK.

  68. #568
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    Any voucher, pls )
    OK

  69. #569
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    Whatcha mean?
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  70. #570
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    I'm going to order https://www.bikeyoke.de/en/product_i...tml&no_boost=1 and some small parts, and I was just wondering if anyone here can share some voucher (coupon code)

    )))
    OK

  71. #571
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    By the way, what is - Flat Rate Best way shipping method?
    OK

  72. #572
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    Unfortunately there are no vouchers available. Even if there were, I think, it wouldnt be a very smart move from me to post it here in a forum, so that everyone could see, right? (I am owner of BikeYoke, not a customer, just for the notice) ;-)

    I am usually shipping 2-3 times a week, but if I get an order with "best way", Ill try to bring it to post office in person the same day, and include an "air priority" label. This is, however, no guarantee, that the actual shipping time is shorter, than when being shipped the regular way. But it is usually dispatched quicker.
    Shipping times to the US can vary quite a bit. I have had parcels arrived within 4-5 days and some can even take up to 2 weeks and in rare cases even longer. To be honest, I dont really think, this depends on the shipping way, but rather on customs and plane schedules. I am not 100% sure, this is just what I assume.
    BikeYoke staff member - www.bikeyoke.com

  73. #573
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    Anyone know about a setback option for the Revive? Ideally a swappable head or something like that?

  74. #574
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    Anyone know about a setback option for the Revive? Ideally a swappable head or something like that?
    Sacki's answer to me on this was simply......No

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  75. #575
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    Curious to know how fast everyone's post extend to full height. Mine seems slower than I would like and I have 260 psi pumped in and have had the lower foam ring checked by the LBS. it's action is much slower than a Fox Transfer and it kind of annoys me.

    Seems like it takes roughly 1.5 seconds (estimating) to hit full extension when completely slammed (160mm post).

    I am also looking for a replacement shock pump adapter. Mine has gone missing and I did not see them available for purchase on the website.

  76. #576
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    That seems way too slow. Mine is much faster than a Transfer.

    Have you checked that your seat collar isn't overtightened?

  77. #577
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    Quote Originally Posted by hookem34 View Post
    Curious to know how fast everyone's post extend to full height. Mine seems slower than I would like and I have 260 psi pumped in and have had the lower foam ring checked by the LBS. it's action is much slower than a Fox Transfer and it kind of annoys me.

    Seems like it takes roughly 1.5 seconds (estimating) to hit full extension when completely slammed (160mm post).

    I am also looking for a replacement shock pump adapter. Mine has gone missing and I did not see them available for purchase on the website.
    drop seat, loosen seat post clamp a lot... how fast does it return now ?
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  78. #578
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    I have. Its completely slammed into the seat tube and tightened to 4nm. even when i remove the seat collar it is still slow.

  79. #579
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    Mine is also not too fast, but coming from specialized command post everything is slow.. anyway, when pumped with max recommended pressure (260?) it's not too bad, maybe 1s for 185mm. One thing that I have noticed, is that the post is extending slower when dirty or cold, so clean&lube often as with your fork or shock.

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  80. #580
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    Quote Originally Posted by hookem34 View Post
    I have. Its completely slammed into the seat tube and tightened to 4nm. even when i remove the seat collar it is still slow.
    Did you check you cable tension?
    If your cable is too loose your return speed will be slower.

  81. #581
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    I have. If its any tighter it starts raising itself.

  82. #582
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    Quote Originally Posted by akantus178 View Post
    One thing that I have noticed, is that the post is extending slower when dirty or cold, so clean&lube often as with your fork or shock.
    I noticed that too, mostly when cold.
    But only on the first actuation after some time without lowering or rising the seatpost, if I drop or rise the post in a short interval is super fast.
    So my guess is that it's stiction and/or the grease doesn't work well in low temps.

  83. #583
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    Quote Originally Posted by hookem34 View Post
    I have. If its any tighter it starts raising itself.
    I like to have that much cable tension too .
    Did you check your air pressure like akantus178 mentioned?
    Max suggested pressure is 260PSI, but I think they come from factory with lower pressure.

  84. #584
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    Quote Originally Posted by hookem34 View Post
    I have. If its any tighter it starts raising itself.
    Are you sure you have the correct amount of cable in the bottom of the post?
    Does it return slow if you remove the post from the bike and pull the bottom post assembly by hand all the way?

  85. #585
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    Are these as maintenance free (easy to maintaining anyways) as they say? I have a RF turbine and after every ride it gets sticky coming up...have to put some butter on the seal and always make sure to wipe down, etc. had a cheap ks on another bike and never had an issue


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  86. #586
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    I installed the dropper yesterday. A couple of notes:
    - I think it's better to trim the cable wire 1.3 - 1.5mm longer that 17mm recommended by BikeYoke, i.e. 18.3 - 18.5mm and let those 1.3 - 1.5mm extends from the barrel. Still no problem to fit the barrel into the eyelet while it prevents the end of the wire from fraying, if the wire is removed from barrel or the barrel is moving along the wire for accurate setting.
    - to Sacki: if possible, I would appreciate inner recess in hexagonal revive hole so the lever O-ring "clicks" inside the recess and holds the lever much better than the friction used in actual solution (which seems to me insufficient, but not tested in real life, so I could be wrong in estimation).

  87. #587
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    to Sacki: if possible, I would appreciate inner recess in hexagonal revive hole so the lever O-ring "clicks" inside the recess and holds the lever much better than the friction used in actual solution (which seems to me insufficient, but not tested in real life, so I could be wrong in estimation).
    Thought the same thing at first but it's a non issue. I have Revives on two different bikes that see plenty of rocky chunk and levers stay put. 6 months or so since I got the levers.

  88. #588
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacki View Post
    Unfortunately
    Just paid by PayPal.
    Operations came as "Clothing and shoes" not "Sport Goods" (I'm getting cash back for Sport Goods)

    ((
    OK

  89. #589
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmanxj View Post
    Thought the same thing at first but it's a non issue. I have Revives on two different bikes that see plenty of rocky chunk and levers stay put. 6 months or so since I got the levers.

    it's going nowhere by itself
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  90. #590
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    I have not had to revive my post since installing it last July and see no use having a lever on mine. I had to lower the post with the bike upside down to get it to sag so I could test reviving it.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  91. #591
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    A phrase often used at work, you're better off looking at it, than looking for it.

  92. #592
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    also happens in warm weather

    Quote Originally Posted by sacki View Post
    This is very likely due to a temperature difference between riding and storing the post.
    If you ride and use the post in cold weather the oil inside the post will shrink in volume, as almost every material does. So when you go back with your post into the warm house to store the bike, the oil will want to re-extend, because it warms up. Since there is no air inside the inner chamber and the tube is retty stiff, the oil can not extend and so it will go under very high pressure. This pressure needs to be overcome - and it will be very hard to overcome with the remote or by the thumb on the remote. The easiest way to break it loose is just to use a 4mm Allen key and do a quick reset. The key will also be harder to turn, but way easier than the remote.
    This is actually a normal behaviour and can also be seen on other droppers, such as KS LEV. If a post is bled properly and the inner chamber does not contain any air, the extended oil will cause this high pressure inside.
    Just FYI.. I live in SoCal. Went for a ride in the evening, and then left bike in garage after, with post fully extended. Temperature in the garage rose over the next day due to weather, as well as a parked car. Triggy was very stiff after that, similar to what is described above.

    Very nice dropper post though. Good work!

  93. #593
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    I have not had to revive my post since installing it last July and see no use having a lever on mine. I had to lower the post with the bike upside down to get it to sag so I could test reviving it.
    After 8 months of 3-days/week use I finally had to revive my Revive after I took a small spill (a damn piece of . After the spill I eventually noticed that the post was sticking a bit, it did not come back up with the nicely satisfying "clunk".

    It took a blink to revive it using my multi-tool allen key ... and indeed I see no much use to have the nice lever installed unless you bike in Australia (that is anywhere in the southern hemisphere), do loops, or fall a lot!

  94. #594
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    I have a few rides on my revive. By far the smoothest post Ive ever used. I love the light action of the cable for dropping it.

    Long term review coming up end of season.

    So far the post just works, no play, easy to setup however the cable cutting directions left a little too much cable that I had to trim down which is minor. Better long than too short first go.

  95. #595
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    Coming from a Fox Transfer 150, I'm a bit annoyed by how digital the 1x triggy lever is. The action is not as smooth when first initiating the drop. It's almost like you have to overcome a certain preload on the lever before it opens up and drops. So I'm really having to get used to that when using my dropper. It's not smooth, it's very abrupt. I find myself either not pressing hard enough or just pressing too hard and the seat just falling from under me. I've got it set to 250psi.

    Aside from that lever feel, I'm 100% satisfied. Love the reset feature, seat post feels remarkably stiffer than my Transfer which goes to show how much those sag after 1 year of use.

  96. #596
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    I love this dropper post! Used Gravity Dropper (reliable but ugly), KS LEV, Thomson, Specialized Blacklight (decent!) and old Highball. The Thomson is pretty good, but the REVIVE is the best so far. I am about 6 months in, using about 3-4 days per week, close to 100 rides with no issues. Some 4-5 hour rides. A 5000 foot descent near Yosemite. Just waiting for Hole in the Ground to open for high altitude test.

  97. #597
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    Is there a way to minorly adjust the travel? I'd like the 185mm but probably need to knock it down 10 to 15mm for it to be perfect. I know I could just go to the 160 but I'm curious is some adjustment hack is available.

  98. #598
    pvd
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    Yes. You can adjust the travel on a BikeYoke Revive.

    Revive! | Peter Verdone Designs

  99. #599
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvd View Post
    Yes. You can adjust the travel on a BikeYoke Revive.

    Revive! | Peter Verdone Designs
    Interesting, how do you do it? How far can you reduce it? This isn't exactly advertised anywhere that I have seen. Only the OneUp and FallLine are the adjustable one iirc. Good news tho that it can be done!

  100. #600
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    You just make a spacer and put it inside the works. It's pretty simple.

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