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  1. #1
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    9point8 new dropper post???

    I came across this yesterday looking for info on a new dropper post.



    Looks like a Canadian company with a new post in the works and going customer direct according to the website. Home - Nine Point Eight Inc.

    The lever is interesting, I know the lever on my Gravity Dropper is the one thing I hate.

  2. #2
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    Looks alright, Id prefer not to take my finger off my brake though. Could be alot easier than I think though, I dont mind my reverb so I am sure this wouldnt be too bad either.
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  3. #3
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    so i got a little info about this post.

    (1:48:03 PM) me: 1. will it be offered with a traditional thumb activated lever,
    2. will there be a version with the cable attached at a fixed location instead of the head?,
    3. drop length(s)?
    4. any idea of price?
    i love the idea of a stepped and full drop system​ but taking my finger off my brake to use it is a scary thought.

    (1:49:18 PM) John: 1. no plans to offer a thumb lever at this time. I was skeptical about the index finger lever initially too, but it does work really well. Everyone that has tried it has liked it.
    (1:49:46 PM) John: 2. again, no plans at this time.
    (1:50:13 PM) John: 3. 100mm stroke, and it steps in 5mm increments (or full drop)
    (1:51:37 PM) John: 4. sorry, i can't give you any pricing details yet, though I will say, it is a premium product and will command a premium price. The stepping feature is really a game changer in our opinion.
    (1:52:04 PM) John: Regarding taking your finger off the brake lever, that was exactly my thought initially
    (1:52:33 PM) John: but i did find that the moments where i need my finger on the brake are usually also the moments I need my thumb securely wrapped around the bar!

  4. #4
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    I like the mechanism for putting the post down. It looks like you don't have to put pressure on it to drop the post. I love my Reverb but it can a slight pain to have to pressure the post to lower it.
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  5. #5
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    Taking the index finger off shouldn't be a problem if you brake with two fingers.

    Increments looks nice, pity it only has 100mm drop. I imagine what most people are concerned about would be reliability. Is it mechanical locking?

    Quote Originally Posted by VTSession View Post
    It looks like you don't have to put pressure on it to drop the post.
    He's definitely pushing on it to get it to go down.

  6. #6
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    Sorry, but infinite adustment in 5mm incriments is not game changing at all. Ditto for head cable attachment.

    Really looks like these guys took all the "undesireable" portions of a seatpost to make theirs. Pity as I would love to support a Canadian company.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    Taking the index finger off shouldn't be a problem if you brake with two fingers.

    Increments looks nice, pity it only has 100mm drop. I imagine what most people are concerned about would be reliability. Is it mechanical locking?



    He's definitely pushing on it to get it to go down.
    It looks like a ratchet system to lower it? Meh, maybe I'm wrong.
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  8. #8
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    Looks pretty interesting!
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    I like the converting head to offset. 5mm is a small enough increments to be effectively infinite and not change the way you ride adversely(like with fixed stops) like the command post. More competition=better.

  10. #10
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    I like how it can be adjusted in small increments, not a new idea but always enjoyed that ability. Guess ill have to check back when more info comes available on the 21st via what Home - Nine Point Eight Inc. said.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shelbster15 View Post
    I like how it can be adjusted in small increments, not a new idea but always enjoyed that ability. Guess ill have to check back when more info comes available on the 21st via what Home - Nine Point Eight Inc. said.
    Out of curiosity which other post had the stepper small increments adjustments?
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    Taking the index finger off shouldn't be a problem if you brake with two fingers.
    Taking a finger off the rear brake is not a big problem if you brake with front brake.

    Any idea on the weight?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeL View Post
    Out of curiosity which other post had the stepper small increments adjustments?
    Yeah, sorry that wasn't an accurate description on my part. I meant an adjustable seatpost in general. In reference to the hydraulic ones that let you set the height, but by no means are those exact. That 9point8 has taken it a step further and made it exact steps of travel which I like.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Sorry, but infinite adustment in 5mm incriments is not game changing at all. Ditto for head cable attachment.

    Really looks like these guys took all the "undesireable" portions of a seatpost to make theirs. Pity as I would love to support a Canadian company.
    I agree. I think the 5mm increment adjustment is rather gimmicky.

    What the heck is the difference between 1 inch of drop and 1.2 inches of seat drop? I either want my seat up for pedaling or slammed for downhill. Every once in a while I want it somewhere in between for rolling terrain but I don't need 5mm increments to find that position. There are already infinitely adjustable posts on the market that don't require you to ratchet the lever. I think it is easier to hold the lever and sit until the seat is where you want it and let go of the lever.

    I am a bit old school and have a gravity dropper. It has a spring and a pin. It goes up and down and is very reliable. I can choose between fully extended, 1 inch drop or 4" drop. I can't see why I would need any other settings in between. I'm not particular (or weenie enough) to need my seat dropped exactly 45mm for a section of trail.

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    The post doesn't require you to ratchet the lever... in the video he was just demonstrating the increments. I welcome a new competitor, it can only be good for the marketplace. Hopefully it's a good, reliable post.

  16. #16
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    Received my new post today on my way out of town for a bike trip. Just in time. It will be installed in the morning before we hit the trails.

    We're riding DH/free ride at Windrock tomorrow and then over to Pisgah for some trail riding. The pedal up and bomb down style of riding should be a great chance to try out the post.

    Will post some thoughts and a review. Photos coming too.

    Initial impression is that the quality is insanely high. Every part of the post and lever is very well thought out. Very very nice. Impressed.

  17. #17
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    Usd $499.00 (!)

  18. #18
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    Super easy install and set up. I volunteered to drive shuttle, had the post installed before the other riders finished the first run.

    Didn't love the lever feel at the factory setting, but its tuneable with air pressure. I was able to pull the post out and access the valve, dropped it about 50psi and its very light action now, but easy tactile feedback between the ratchet and slammo settings. All this was done without having to disconnect the cabling.

    The post was amazing in action on the mountain today. I have to give it top marks for how precisely positionable it is and how intuitive it is to work. In about 10 minutes it was like I've had it forever. Learning curve?

    There are a couple of places on the mountain where a pedalling section abruptly becomes a section of gnar with wheelie drops and steep chutes. I am pretty sure the post got used more than my gears and brakes.

    No exaggeration, I surprised myself in a couple of spots where I had extra confidence to hit some big drops...was super easy to set up and drop the seat and flow right off.

    Tomorrow is a trail day, will post more impressions.

    Thoroughly loving it so far. Bomber construction.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dump View Post
    Usd $499.00 (!)
    500 bills, directly from the manufacturer. that's ridiculous money.
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  20. #20
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    Today we rode in Pisgah.

    The route we did had a bunch of different sections. There was an uphill climb, parts were smooth, parts were techy. Then a big hike, over a ridge to an insane gnarfest downhill. Then a wet rooty sidehill trail with rocky stream crossings and logovers and boulder piles.

    I got a ton of chances to try the post in different scenarios.

    For the uphill, there were lots of places where the trail required hopping up over roots, water bars and obstacles, and it was great to be able to drop the post 1, 2 or 3 clicks to get a bigger hop while still being able to sit and pedal efficiently.

    My bike is hard to carry, but today I dropped the seat and was able to lift the whole bike from the lowered saddle. We had to walk a half mile up a skinny rocky ledge.

    Obviously the downhill was amazing, I rode a bunch of it just 1 or 2 clicks down. Again it was easy to move to a fully slammed position in time for a serious drop. Even with the bike rodeo-ing around.

    In the final flow trail, I was slamming the seat for river and stream crossings, and I was managing to have enough space to hop my bike trials-style up and over the far rocky stream banks and downed logs, then right back to pedaling position.

    So everything was flawless.

    I totally love the small changes the post is capable of. In tons of situations, it was a huge thing.

    A couple of people have mentioned the cost...I have watched my buddies travel with spare posts and it seems like everyone owns two or three, with a bunch of backups. It seems like everyone has a story about breaking or fixing a post. Lifetime warranty on the 9point8. Just holding it in your hand makes other droppers look like a toy. It's build quality and function are on par with any top end fork or component. It's obvious that there's substantially more involved than a lot of what's on the market.

    I have to admit, this post is making me rethink my saddle position. I was running my seat back on the rails before, so I could slide fore/aft to get minor leg extension changes. Now that this post can achieve that in the vertical dimension, I am seeing how uncentered I have been before at times. The ability to get a small tweak in leg extension is kind of a game changer...felt so much stronger on the climbs today and made a ton of difficult sections.

  21. #21
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    I brake with one finger, so I think taking the finger of the front brake is unacceptable. There are many times where a surprise downhill section requires dropping the post immediately while you are riding down.

    Isn't that the the whole point of a dropper post, quick on the fly adjustment while you ride?

  22. #22
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    n/m

  23. #23
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    Hey croz...the brilliant design of the lever let's you go left or right, top or bottom and at right angles. Its way more customizable than any other control I have ever had. Tons of ways you could mount it. It plays nicely with the other stuff on my bars...sits just along my other controls with perfect offset.

  24. #24
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    I got my post the other day and took it out for a good solid ride on some known-trails (I prefer testing new gear on trails I am familiar with first). I've tried a few posts including Rock Shox, Specialized and AMP (All Mountain Post: no longer around). The AMP post I find is one of the best because it has 3 indexed riding positions and I like to know where I am in saddle height.
    That is what intrigued me about the 9point8 Pulse with it's "stepper" feature.

    Like lukey mentioned, the build quality is top notch. There is a bit of weight to the post but it feels super solid. Some other post feel a bit flimsy to me, especially the heads that bolt down the saddle. The saddle clamping mechanism on the Pulse is sturdy!
    I went with the non-offset saddle head and it worked out fine.

    Also, as lukey said, setup was super easy and quick. Again, you can feel the design and build quality when you are installing the lever and post. The lever is very light and the pieces fit intricately together (very cool).
    The lever is a lot smaller than I was expecting. Not sure if it's the angle of some of the pictures on their website but the lever isn't as intrusive as I would have expected.

    Basically, the post does what you expect it to do. If you are experienced using a dropper post then you know the benefits of using one: drop it down for more control and room when doing anything technical and steep; pops back up when you are riding normally or climbing. That's all you can really ask for it to do.
    At the lever it feels responsive and solid.

    After a few tries you get a good idea what the "stepper" function is all about. I am not a "slam the post all the way down" type of rider. To me dropping the post all the way down is too much.
    I usually dropped the post down 3 to 4 steps and it was perfect for fast downhill sections. It's nice to know that you can push it down more if you need to.

    As for the lever? It takes some getting used to.
    I have my brakes setup for single finger braking so they are positioned a little far inward, which puts the post lever pretty far away. I tried installing the post lever on the outside of the brake lever and rode around my block to see if that would work and found it to interfere with my hand when riding.
    Definitely not a good idea. Keep the lever on the inside of your brake and shift lever setup.

    Towards the end of the ride I was getting accustomed to the lever for post. Maybe a couple of little angle adjustments to get it right.

    As for what CrozCountry said: I understand where you are coming from. Taking your finger away from your brake lever to adjust the post can be a little unnerving and I had a couple of sketchy moments but I think it depends on how well you know the trail to prepare to drop the saddle. I am considering maybe putting the lever on the left side of the bar so I can always have my right finger working the rear brake.

    All I can say is that there is a bit of adjustment time to operating it and it becomes more natural the more you use it.

    The product looks and feels like it will last and take some abuse.

  25. #25
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    I am back from my trip now, and just wanted to drop back in to mention a couple more impressions. The post continued to work well for the rest of the trip, and there were zero issues with the performance. So all totally positive.

    On the third day, we did a ride that began with a 9-mile climb. Many long sections of the climb were steep enough to require a forward position on the bike to keep the front wheel down.

    I had been experimenting with the extension of the post a bit. Before the ride, I inserted the post so that on full extension, it was +5mm *longer* than my old neutral position. Then, using it riding on the trail, I would ride normally dropped 1 click down from full, to put me in my exact same position as before. In other words, the post is +5mm's longer than normal, and I simply drop it one click down 5mm from the top. It's super easy to reset the post to this position and to know where you are with it.

    The benefit of this scheme really shone on this long climb. When I was slid forward on the bike, I could click the post up 5mm's to full extension, and therefore get *normal* leg extension while being in the right spot where I was also keeping the front wheel down on the climb. (Normally, from the front of the saddle, you're also a little closer to your pedals.)

    Think of it like a climb setting like on some forks. Very very cool: a dropper post with a climb setting!

    Most of the other nice things about the post are mentioned in my earlier messages.

    So far, it's a really killer product.

  26. #26
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    So... I've spent a couple more weeks riding the Pulse and I have zero complaints or issues. It's basically disappeared underneath me which is a good sign because you're not thinking about it or worried about it.
    The weather hasn't been the greatest in the southern Ontario region. It's been pretty hot, humid and wet so conditions have been a bit harsh on the bike. Lots of washing and cleaning and so far the Pulse post still performs like it did when I first put it on.
    The main lip seal seems to do its job and the actual mechanics are tucked away up under the seat so they don't get exposed to all the grime.

    So far so good.

    Also, I moved the lever to the left side of the handle bar and it works MUCH better for my style of riding. The use of the lever has become second nature as well.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by dump View Post
    Usd $499.00 (!)
    Yup, I coughed blood when I saw that...
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Yup, I coughed blood when I saw that...

    I know that the post is more expensive than what else is out there on the market but from what it sounds like you get what you pay for.

    ALL of the threads on this forum about dropper posts have been about finding the most reliable product or how to fix their broken seat post. From what I have come to understand, and researched and read about the 9point8 post is that it is designed and built to last and the company is standing behind their product.

    Yes, the drop is "only" 100mm, shorter compared to the competition but there are reasons why that is according to the website:
    Bearing Stance Why is it Important? - Articles2 - Nine Point Eight Inc.

    Basically, to make it a stronger, more reliable seat post.

    The price is higher because it is billed as a premium product. Not everybody spends $2000-$3000 on a frame, but some do, and that is, from my opinion, is who this product is made for.

    A product that is designed, built to take a beating and built to last. You can feel that it is a solid, high quality seat post.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by wArden View Post
    I know that the post is more expensive than what else is out there on the market but from what it sounds like you get what you pay for.

    ALL of the threads on this forum about dropper posts have been about finding the most reliable product or how to fix their broken seat post. From what I have come to understand, and researched and read about the 9point8 post is that it is designed and built to last and the company is standing behind their product.

    Yes, the drop is "only" 100mm, shorter compared to the competition but there are reasons why that is according to the website:
    Bearing Stance Why is it Important? - Articles2 - Nine Point Eight Inc.

    Basically, to make it a stronger, more reliable seat post.

    The price is higher because it is billed as a premium product. Not everybody spends $2000-$3000 on a frame, but some do, and that is, from my opinion, is who this product is made for.

    A product that is designed, built to take a beating and built to last. You can feel that it is a solid, high quality seat post.
    Not to rain on your parade, but Thomson does everything you mention with a well-earned reputation to boot. It'll be interesting to see how it lasts, but so far it's been stellar. 20mm less than the competition doesn't seem like a particularly interesting selling point. You can have a wide bearing stance with 120mm travel too. Their main selling point imo is the incremental dropping + mini brake lever. The highest priced post to a brand new company? Not for me.

  30. #30
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    I saw the Thomson and intrigued. I've been a Thomson fan and customer for a long time.

    The 100mm drop on the 9point8 is more than enough for me and my riding style.

  31. #31
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    I'd say the jury's still out on long term performance of the 9point8 (and Thomson for that matter). They haven't been out long enough for anything more than guessing. I've had my 9point8 for about three weeks. So far so good
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    No arguments there.

  33. #33
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    considering they're selling direct to the consumer and are the most expensive? Factor in an additional 30-50% to the MSRP for traditional channel marketing... They're spendy! Either their manufacturing processes are labor intensive and inefficient, driving the cost up or they're seriously gouging their customers. The product may be good, but considering a Thompson costs less from my LBS, one has to wonder what's going on there...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    considering they're selling direct to the consumer and are the most expensive? Factor in an additional 30-50% to the MSRP for traditional channel marketing... They're spendy! Either their manufacturing processes are labor intensive and inefficient, driving the cost up or they're seriously gouging their customers. The product may be good, but considering a Thompson costs less from my LBS, one has to wonder what's going on there...
    A new company bringing one new higher end product to market. Their volume is low and their prices will be high. Some companies will do a discounted initial pre-order sale to generate interest in the product.

    They also claim a life time warranty compared to the two year warranty from Thompson. Both companies only claim warranty on workmanship and materials though. 9point8 states that wear/tear parts aren't covered then goes on to list basically every part of the post as wear and tear. So it sounds more like marketing then an actual selling point.
    Last edited by kan3; 07-18-2013 at 07:16 PM.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by kan3 View Post
    A new company bringing one new higher end product to market. Their volume is low and their prices will be high. Some companies will do a discounted initial pre-order sale to generate interest in the product.

    They also claim a life time warranty compared to the two year warranty from Thompson. Both companies only claim warranty on workmanship and materials though. 9point8 states that wear/tear parts aren't covered then goes on basically every part of the post as wear and tear. So it sounds more like marketing then an actual selling point.
    I hear you. Lifetime warranty from a brand new/no-name company isn't worth much. Thompson on the other hand is saying it's two years before any service is required... that is good.

  36. #36
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    At 9point8, we understand that our reputation for customer service will be built on our response to warranty claims, if/when they occur. We stand behind our lifetime warranty, and will interpret each claim generously. The warranty covers ALL parts in the post, but may not cover the wear and tear on parts after lengthy use.

    With reasonable care and maintenance, and some replacement of some wear and tear components from time to time, the post will be guaranteed to work for you as long as you own it.

    But the proof will only come with time. Give us a chance to earn your confidence; we will not disappoint. Contact our customer service team at any time, if you have any questions.

    S
    Steven Park
    9point8 bicycle components
    Customer service: support@9point8.ca | 877-799-0839

  37. #37
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    ^ good deal, thanks steven.

  38. #38
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    I'm thinking seriously about going with one of these in spite of the price, the potential issues a new company represents and the rather high shipping costs.

    It is a nice looking product and I'd like to see some major improvement in durability.

    Anybody got any pics of their installation?
    All the examples I see on their website look pretty clean but they don't have a lot of variation in 4 or 5 photos of similar brake/shifter components in spite of being produced by several different manufactures.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by archer View Post
    Anybody got any pics of their installation?
    All the examples I see on their website look pretty clean but they don't have a lot of variation in 4 or 5 photos of similar brake/shifter components in spite of being produced by several different manufactures.
    9point8 Pulse Assembly - YouTube

  40. #40
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    Well they seem responsive to questions.
    I'm not far from putting money down on a dropper and this is one of three possibilities.

  41. #41
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    I placed an order, should be in late next week. I think the bolt on seatpost clamp might be a few days later but I should get to try it out local sometime next weekend. Ready for trips the weekend after.

    The price is pretty high but top alternates were the Thompson, the KS LEV and the KS Supernatural. None of them are exactly inexpensive.

  42. #42
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    I have been looking and the range is 250/430 for all others. I mean a 100 difference for steps seems like a no brainer yes to me. Down, seat is down. Up, seat is up. Regular trail, I like a little lower than full up, so the step function to me seems the way to be able to lock in that spot vs guessing how much down all time.

  43. #43
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    Just chiming in - got about 40+ days on the post now plus a three week road trip through the Yukon and Northern BC. Flawless.

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    Bumping this thread up, as it's been several weeks...
    Everyone still happy with this? Lukey? Warden?

    I'm thinking I'm heading this way for my first dropper.

  45. #45
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    50 odd rides so far on the post. Flawless. Never touch it for maintenance
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  46. #46
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    The post is still working flawlessly.

    However, one unanticipated issue is that I had to get a new bike for it. It turned my AM ride into a FR/DH beast...or so I thought until I slowly destroyed the frame over the course of the season.

    The post really opened up a can of worms. It's so intuitive and fast to change heights that it made my riding a lot more fun. Your old frame my regret it if you get one. I couldn't recommend it enough if you want to go bigger and faster, it's lightning quick to adapt to the terrain you're encountering. Just like braking or shifting, just flowing along and switching the height is very fluid and doesn't take any real concentration.

    I am starting to see a bit of wiggle in the alignment pins, which doesn't affect performance and can't be felt yet. Just a guess: I think it's going to go about one to two full seasons before those need changing, we shall see.

  47. #47
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    Thanks for making what seems to be a good product guys, but hey, c'mon, the price? Really? $500 clams?

    As I've recently begun to look at droppers, even the $300 - $400 price point of some other posts seem unreasonable in my mind.

    Take an item like this for example. Stop and consider all of the manufactured parts (many precision) within this thing; a complete gas engine, an electric motor, the fuel tank, the frame, the panel, the wheels..............and all for less than an adjustable seat-post for a bike.

    I suggest that you'd sell a lot more of them (and make more money) if you made a serious adjustment on the price.
    I call him free who is led solely by reason. (Baruch Spinoza)

  48. #48
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    Having just purchased a Reverb and having it fail in the middle of a 34 mile bike ride, I now think I should have gone a different route. The Pulse is kind of ridiculous in pricing, but if I never have to stop on a trail and rig my bike to work, I can see it being a solid purchase. Now to fix the Reverb, sell it and some other bits to afford a Pulse...

    To the guys who own one- Can you portage with this post? Some of the hikes I have to make are super steep and it's just easier to throw the bike on a shoulder. I'm worried it would damage the post, so any experiences with this?

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuffguy View Post
    To the guys who own one- Can you portage with this post? Some of the hikes I have to make are super steep and it's just easier to throw the bike on a shoulder. I'm worried it would damage the post, so any experiences with this?
    Yes, you can lift the bike from the saddle, it's a great system for that kind of thing. At any height setting the post is locked in a vertical height position against both upwards and downwards force. It's easy to hook the nose over your shoulder or to lift it from your hand. The seat and the post won't move up/down unless the bar-trigger is also pressed down.

    I did a major 10-mile plus hike-a-bike ride this summer which involved climbing up to shoulder-height rock ledges for several hours. I actually found I was using the dropper to make the bike theconvenient height to lift depending on what clearance or height I needed. My frame didn't otherwise have a good handling point because of the shock placement, so slamming/raising the seat made it into a kind of grab handle that was well balanced to lift the bike with one hand. At lower height I could lift it over tall ground obstacles, then at higher settings I could reach it from above and haul it up.

  50. #50
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    A new lever?

    Looks like they are working on a new lever design for the Pulse. Pretty cool.

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p>The new lever plays nice with Shimano brakes. <a href="https://twitter.com/9point8ca">@9point8ca</a> <a href="http://t.co/Bt42g1QMAT">pic.twitter.com/Bt42g1QMAT</a></p>&mdash; Dundas Speed Shop (@DundasSpeedShop) <a href="https://twitter.com/DundasSpeedShop/statuses/398885432965869568">November 8, 2013</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

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