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  1. #1
    Singletrack Snob
    Reputation: Vitamin G's Avatar
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    Year Round Commuter: CX vs. 29er

    I'm in the market for a year round commuter/errand bike. Weather will range from sunny and 80's in the summer to snow and sub-zero temperatures in the winter (typical Wisconsin weather).

    Looking at either a SE Stout singlespeed 29er, or a Motobecane singlespeed 'cross bike.

    I figure the cross bike would be quicker in the good weather, but the 29er might be better in the winter. I ride mainly on side streets which usually have an inch of snow or more on them, with various hidden patches of ice.

    Any other advantages to one bike over the other? This will be replacing an old road bike, which is not good at winter riding (25mm tires in snow and ice? not for me).
    "I've got a card in my spokes, I'm practicing my jokes. I'm learning!"

  2. #2
    Frys With That, Please
    Reputation: cda 455's Avatar
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    If someone made a carbide-stud 29'er tire that's 2.3" to 2.5' wide, I'd go for the 29'er.

  3. #3
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
    Reputation: JordyB's Avatar
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    I'd say you'd really want two bikes. Fast summer bike and a winter fatbike. Converting to fat this winter made my cold/snowy commute so much easier. Something my 29er with studs just could not handle. Sure ice is a problem some times but that's what home made fat tire studs are for! ;p

  4. #4
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
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    I think the 29r would handle better on snow & ice (get the studded tires), and on city streets you probably won't lose much time compared to the cross bike in the summer if you switch to slicks. You probably have a little better visibility in and of traffic on the 29r too, since you're more upright.

  5. #5
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    I've done a lot of commuting on a rigid 29er with semi-slicks (Vulpines). It's not bad, but I've come to the conclusion it could be a lot better with the right kind of bike.

    The problem with just about all the 29ers is there's no clean and proper way to mount full fenders and a rack on them (no eyelets, etc.). It took some creativity to mount PB's Cascadia 29er fenders on my bike, and it was a pretty sharp install. But, riding the bike like a 29er should be ridden - bombing off curbs, going down steps, etc. always managed to knock them slightly out of position, and resulted in a lot of racket and tire rubbing. It just turned into a rickety affair, and it completely killed the fun of riding that bike. In addition, the upright riding position became a real drag - literally. I tried to stretch and lower my riding position with longer stems and bar ends. In other words, I was trying to make the bike do something it wasn't designed to do.

    I'm now seriously looking at something like a Salsa Vaya or Fargo. Clearance for larger tires and fenders, drop bars, discs, and eyelets galore. I don't know how a commuter could get much better than that.

  6. #6
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    The Vaya or the Fargo is exactly the way to go. I think I did fully make the decision to get the Vaya. I'll have mine in about t-minus 35 days.

  7. #7
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    Cross check? Fat-ish knobbies in winter and slicks as big or small as you want in summer.

  8. #8
    Singletrack Snob
    Reputation: Vitamin G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vaultbrad
    Cross check? Fat-ish knobbies in winter and slicks as big or small as you want in summer.
    I would jump all over that except that I can get either a SE Stout or a Motobecane complete bike for the same price as the Cross Check frame. Not enough in the bank account for a Cross Check

    I figure with the Stout I could run skinny tires in the summer, and it would probably be OK.
    "I've got a card in my spokes, I'm practicing my jokes. I'm learning!"

  9. #9
    The Road Warrior
    Reputation: LandSpeed's Avatar
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    I wrote out a long-ish reply comparing different CX builds from different companies... looks like you're settled on just one.
    Last edited by LandSpeed; 12-22-2010 at 10:45 PM.

  10. #10
    Singletrack Snob
    Reputation: Vitamin G's Avatar
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    SE Stout == Dawes Deadeye?

    Before I click the "buy" button, I'm looking at other options for commuter bikes. It appears that the SE Stout is the same bike as the Dawes Deadeye? Can anybody confirm? If so, the Bikes Direct price is the same as Jenson's sale price.

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/dawes/deadeye.htm
    "I've got a card in my spokes, I'm practicing my jokes. I'm learning!"

  11. #11
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    Originally Posted by Vitamin G
    ...It appears that the SE Stout is the same bike as the Dawes Deadeye?...
    very similar but not exactly the same...most obvious difference is the '09 & '10 Stout's double wishbone looptail rear triangle.

    bikesdirect guys like their deadeyes, there's a huge thread about it in ss forum while at the same time the stout riders like theirs a lot too & there is also a long thread about that in 29ers.

    i rode a stout all summer & early fall...it was great. my riding buddy bought a deadeye, he liked the orange & wanted a size he could not get the stout in @ jenson. we rode together a lot, swapped bikes back & forth to compare. maybe it was just our 2 bikes but i can tell you that my stout was finished nicer & my friend ended up wishing he had gotten the stout. in fact, when i decided i wanted to go back to a geared bike, he bought mine.

    you really can't go wrong with either if you have definitely decided on a lower priced rigid ss 29er & you still have monocogs & peaces that aren't much higher priced to consider...good luck!

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