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  1. #1
    blet drive
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    winter tire set up

    It official winter has set in on us in mass. So I set up a set of winter commuter tires and took them for there test ride tonight. The front held up great and when I came back inside the rear was flat. Time to investigate what happened.


    winter tire set up-unnamed-5-.jpgwinter tire set up-unnamed-4-.jpgwinter tire set up-unnamed-3-.jpg
    Last edited by JUNGLEKID5; 12-16-2013 at 07:56 AM.
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  2. #2
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    Screws for ice aside, is that inverted tread design good on slush and snow?
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  3. #3
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    ^^ Yes. I hauled a laser printer on about 2 inches of squirmy snow over snow pack with my Michelin City tires on my errand bike 2 winters ago. Not as good as the studded snows which have a bit more knobby tread but surprisingly good. I used 700-35 then, now it has 700-38 Michelin City Tires.

  4. #4
    I Ride for Donuts
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    I have Serfas Drifters with the inverted design...bigger 'holes' in them than the ones pictured... and they do pretty well in the slop. They do better than my Big Apples did.
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    (unless you don't have studded tires)
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  5. #5
    blet drive
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    They were tires that I had hanging out. So I figuerd I would try it out. What tires does every one use?
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by XJaredX View Post
    Screws for ice aside, is that inverted tread design good on slush and snow?
    My Maxxis Hookworm's inverted tread had me feeling a lot more secure than I should, but their fatness has to push a lot of heavy slush out of the way. I've only been using them because I don't have anything else yet. My studded tires are on some UPS truck somewhere as I ordered them a bit too late. I managed to grab the last two 45NRTH Gravdals they had and I notice a lot of studded tires are sold out. I have never ridden on studs before, and I'm really excited about the traction and the thinner width. The paths around here are ice-rutted with frozen footprints about 2-3 inches thick, from tons of freezing rain, slush, and snowfall. This will be my first winter being able to ride in whatever conditions. Winter seems to have come early this year, and we've been getting a lot of snow. It's not even December 21st yet, the first day of winter, winter solstice, or whatever.

  7. #7
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    I wonder if the length of your studs is a factor in your flat. If you think about it, ice on pavement USUALLY isn't super thick. especially black ice, which is the biggest danger for a bike. For other types, careful riding usually will keep you upright. With long spikes like that, you're going to push the head of the spike into your tube. I'd dremel the tips off, at least. If you look at the studded tires on the market, the studs don't protrude much from the tire tread. Just enough to grip onto the ice, not dig through it to the pavement.

    Putting spikes like that onto a mtb for trail use isn't such a big deal, since the trail is not as hard as pavement. Though I've never felt I needed studs on the trail, anyway.

  8. #8
    blet drive
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    I am hoping that they will wear in..
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  9. #9
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    My 45NRTH Gravdal studded tires arrived this afternoon. I was too excited to wait, they went on easier than any other tire I've ever mounted, and I've mounted a lot. I thought it was the wrong size, both beads just slid over my 25mm Alex rim like hot butter. I was worried they might blow off the bead, but I've had no such issues.

    The tires felt nice. I don't know if they're made by "Innova" or not, but they just feel really nice to the touch of my hand. The studs are arranged in a cool "V" shape and they have convex heads. The shoulders of the little studs are sharp, as I scratched my arm and it took some skin with it.

    I first tried the frozen rutted bike path and it was scary, but it worked amazingly. There's about 3 or 4 inches of snow on top of ice, so the 38mm width of these tires had to dig pretty deep to get traction on the slippery ice. The only times it was scary was when I got caught in the ruts of other bicycles. My front tire had to "hop" out of these ruts and it felt like crossing railroad tracks the wrong way with skinny tires and getting your wheel stuck. Once I got used to the technique, I found that grabbing the bars tight, and just man-handling that front tire and forcing it to go where I wanted was the best way to keep my balance.

    I never fell, and I got going pretty fast on the shoulder of a road, with icy spots along the shoulder and cars passing. Going about 30 mph down a hill and just charging into the icy sections with confidence that the car next to me wouldn't kill me (in the dark) was pretty exciting. Probably the biggest rush I've had in a long time, actually.

    Once I learned to just trust the studs, everything was great. I had to adjust to a new riding style, different than sand, or gravel, or wet grass or mud. It only took a few minutes to adjust. Being used to riding in the dirt and knowing what it feels like to slide around a bit was a big help. I think it might be a tougher transition if you've only ridden dry tarmac thus far.

    My first "ice ride" and a pedestrian even yelled at me that they couldn't believe I was riding a bicycle in the icy snow. I think they were amazed, but maybe I was just projecting that energy.

    It's supposed to warm up this week, but it feels good to be ready for whatever this winter brings. Aluminum frame, mostly sealed bearings, stainless fenders and racks, waterproof bags . . . I'm glad I didn't get a fat bike. I'm LOVING this thing.

  10. #10
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    ^^ Nice Gritter!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    ^^ Nice Gritter!
    Thanks, mtbxplorer! If 45NRTH's "Nicotine" tires are addictive, these Gravdals should have been named, "Heroin". I haven't been able to stay off this bike! The sound of the studs on icy tarmac sounds like a quiet version of MIG welding splatter, or maybe the sound of bacon frying - it's really cool (and all new to me)!

    The little "new tire hairs" are tickling my stainless steel fenders while I "seat these studs" during the break-in period.



    I tried plastic fenders with mudflaps first, but they quickly packed with snow. These stainless fenders are hardcore and the edge is sharp enough to just cut most of the snow off before it gets all up in there. (Neoprene sleeve for Kleen Kanteen helps keep water from freezing)



    Keeps my drivetrain clean. (still need to wrap my chainstay too, but that "roller clutch / type 2" derailleur is supposed to eliminate chain slaps)


  12. #12
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    Schwalbe Marathon Winters on the wife's bike, and since we had probs with the beads on the Snow Studs I'm now running Kenda Klondikes.
    Marathon Winters have very shallow tread depth, so for "black ice on street" use they're great. The Klondikes have a lot more "dig in and grunt" to them so for deeper snow they're better.
    Also- their studs seem closer to the centerline of the tire so they buzz a little more than the mw's.
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  13. #13
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by JUNGLEKID5 View Post
    They were tires that I had hanging out. So I figuerd I would try it out. What tires does every one use?
    Do you mean "which tires for DIY studding"? If so, almost every one I`ve seen has been with knobbies- more rubber to support the studs. I wish you luck with the ones you have, though. What you`re attempting (light duty studded for light duty ice) doesn`t seem to be available commercially in 559, in spite of the need for such a tire. Sure wish there was a 26 inch version of that Niccotine or the Nokian A10. I think Nate has a good point about the exposed stud length. They look too long to me, too. Have you ever checked out the DIY studs sticky in BFnet`s "Winter Biking" subforum? It`s been going for years with lots of examples and ideas.

    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts View Post
    Schwalbe Marathon Winters on the wife's bike, and since we had probs with the beads on the Snow Studs I'm now running Kenda Klondikes.
    Marathon Winters have very shallow tread depth, so for "black ice on street" use they're great. The Klondikes have a lot more "dig in and grunt" to them so for deeper snow they're better.
    Also- their studs seem closer to the centerline of the tire so they buzz a little more than the mw's.
    Byknuts, it was Snow Studs tires that gave you so much trouble? Who makes those? FWIW, I have Marathon Winters, and they do grab well in many conditions, but IMO, they`re not ideal for that "black ice on street". Really hard to push, which I think comes from those incredibly stiff sidewalls. Very heavy too, but I think that`s a lesser evil than the danged sidewalls. Of course, with your wife`s stud muffin leg power, she probably doesn`t notice the extra drag that keeps trying to beat me into submision
    Recalculating....

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    I wonder if the length of your studs is a factor in your flat.
    That was my first thought as well. The only real reason you'd need studs that long is if you were running over massively rutted ice and they had to reach pretty far down to hit anything. On relatively flat ice, you just need a few mm to get a grip. Much more than that, and you'll start pushing the studs into the tire and causing a flat.

  15. #15
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    I like those Gravdal's. Where'd you get them? And which version? the 120tpi alu/carbide or the 27tpi steel/carbide version? They seem hard to find.

  16. #16
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    I've been kicking around getting the Gradval's, I was just going to have my LBS order them, put them on item watch if they aren't in stock at QBP... I can't decide though because like today for example, I rode my fatbike to work, which was perfect, and I encountered zero ice even though we've had multiple snows in the past week, today included.
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  17. #17
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    There's plentiful ice in my neck of the woods lately. Not so much in the roads, because they're salted and plowed well, and temps have been in the 20's (prime temps for salt to work). Parking lots, though, are REALLY messy with ice. That will change this week, though. After this evening's upcoming snowfall, temps will rise into the 50's and melt all this stuff off. Next weekend we'll have another cold system come through, though it's unclear yet whether it will bring snow or rain. I'm doing a full moon pub crawl ride tonight, and the results will determine whether I get a set of studs for the rest of the winter.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Do you mean "which tires for DIY studding"? If so, almost every one I`ve seen has been with knobbies- more rubber to support the studs. I wish you luck with the ones you have, though. What you`re attempting (light duty studded for light duty ice) doesn`t seem to be available commercially in 559, in spite of the need for such a tire. Sure wish there was a 26 inch version of that Niccotine or the Nokian A10. I think Nate has a good point about the exposed stud length. They look too long to me, too. Have you ever checked out the DIY studs sticky in BFnet`s "Winter Biking" subforum? It`s been going for years with lots of examples and ideas.

    Byknuts, it was Snow Studs tires that gave you so much trouble? Who makes those? FWIW, I have Marathon Winters, and they do grab well in many conditions, but IMO, they`re not ideal for that "black ice on street". Really hard to push, which I think comes from those incredibly stiff sidewalls. Very heavy too, but I think that`s a lesser evil than the danged sidewalls. Of course, with your wife`s stud muffin leg power, she probably doesn`t notice the extra drag that keeps trying to beat me into submision
    Nokian makes great 26er studded tires for commuting. I run the mount and ground 26x1.95. They also make the hakkapelitta( sp) in 26 and 700c. I run hakka 700x35 on my other winter commuter.

  19. #19
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    If conditions are even marginally wintery, I usually just go full-bore with the wide Schwalbe 379s tubeless at low pressure. Overkill for most non-bizzard road conditions, but it's only 10km to work, and this allows me the option of doing some winter trail riding on the way home.

    If the roads are dry, the forecast is clear, I have a disk 700C wheelset with semi-slick CX tires that I can change to in a minute or so.

    I used to have an third commuting wheelset with non-studded mountain bike tires as a middle-ground option, but used it rarely enough that it's been cannibalized for parts.

  20. #20
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    How are the studded tires on clear pavement? That's the main reason I haven't gone studded, even though we have ice patches, its separated by large expanses of clear pavement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Nokian makes great 26er studded tires for commuting. I run the mount and ground 26x1.95. They also make the hakkapelitta( sp) in 26 and 700c. I run hakka 700x35 on my other winter commuter.
    What do you think of the mount and grounds or the hakkas on snow? I have been running the marathon winters but they are really struggling on the compacted snow. I have spun out in a few areas especially if there is new snow on top of that. I have been wondering if something with a slightly more aggressive tread might work a little better. Do they do ok on road as well? My route is split between poorly plowed compacted snow with ice patches and better plowed roads (with ice patches and slop thrown in for good measure).


    KentheKona- the marathon winters do really well on clear pavement, especially if you run them at the higher end of pressure. They are not as happy under snowier conditions though.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by KentheKona View Post
    How are the studded tires on clear pavement? That's the main reason I haven't gone studded, even though we have ice patches, its separated by large expanses of clear pavement.
    Studs work very well on asphalt or side walk concrete....

    They have zero traction on poklished concrete or ceramic tile.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by scubaklook View Post
    What do you think of the mount and grounds or the hakkas on snow? I have been running the marathon winters but they are really struggling on the compacted snow. I have spun out in a few areas especially if there is new snow on top of that. I have been wondering if something with a slightly more aggressive tread might work a little better. Do they do ok on road as well? My route is split between poorly plowed compacted snow with ice patches and better plowed roads (with ice patches and slop thrown in for good measure).

    https://www.google.ca/search?q=fredd...70%3B802%3B601

    The one on the right is a Freddie Revenze studded tire....that is the type of tire that will get you through deeper snow, with softer packed snow beneath....

    I run Nokian M&G if the snow is light and I want to cut through to a well consolidated layer....

    If the snow is heavier and I want to float more I pick the Freddie Revenze

  24. #24
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    Good studded tires are a must have in Minneapolis. I'd never skimp on them because I'm terrified of sliding under a moving car.

    As a company I really dislike 45nrth, but I have a pair of their Xerxes and they're pretty damn nice on ice. Things have been especially awful this year so I'm using Dillingers on my Moonlander, which are good until they pick up so much snow that the studs can't reach the ice for traction.

    Both are folding because life's too short for cheap bike tires.

  25. #25
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    I hope David pipes in from Montreal, I don't recall the details of his DIY screw setup, but he seemed pretty happy with them. I had good luck with DIY, traction-wise using car studs (drill holes in knobbies and insert from inside tire), but eventually in everyday use a tube protector would shift enough for the stud flange to chafe the tube and cause a flat. I have a low tolerance for flats in winter, so I switched to the flat-free pre-fabs when they became available and I could afford them.

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