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  1. #1
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    Where to carry 10lbs of lock and half gallon of water?

    Let's start with the first problem.

    1) I need to carry about 10lbs of lock and chain (5' chain). This is a fairly large 12mm chain BTW. I was thinking of a handle bar bag but is it good for the stem and bars to put that much weight on them? I've got panniers but I need a way to distribute weight throughout the bike really, and this would be a good place to start.

    2) I tend to carry a half gallon (or more) container of water with me on long rides. Where could that be put other than my panniers?

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    1) Is it a nice bike? I had a beater I rode in New York City, and a big honkin' chain. I wrapped it around the top tube, with a loop around the seat tube. It kept everything out of my way and didn't effect the handling much - I find that the closer to the bottom bracket I put a load, the less it effects the handling of the bike. However, it'll chew the hell out of your paint. I wrapped mine in inner tubes and didn't care much anyway.

    2) How about three smaller containers? Three bike bottles should have you covered. Down tube, seat tube if you still have room after the chain, and then a couple in the "tri rocket" position behind the saddle. If you're doing panniers anyway, you can put your tools in the bottom of a pannier to open up that position. Some bikes also put bottles on the back of the fork. When I go on a longer ride, I usually don't need a lock, so I can do two bottles on the frame and one on a jersey pocket. Longer than that and I'll do a camelbak with on the order of half a gallon of capacity, plus bottles. That gets me to five hours; I haven't had to figure out how to do more without a refill somewhere.

    There are also hydration systems advertised for triathletes that fit either at the handlebars (bringing back the weight problem) or up by the head tube, between the top tube and down tube.

    I wouldn't worry about putting an extra 10 lb on the handlebar. Think about what you do to it when you drop your front wheel off a curb badly, or don't lighten up going over a pot hole.

    How about a pic of the bike?

    EDIT: I have to admit, I had to look up what a half gallon is in ounces. I'm crappy at US measurements! Went elsewhere for the 3rd through 5th grade. My immediate reaction was dayamn, that's a lot of water. But when I looked it up, I realized I carry that much, or more sometimes, on longer rides pretty frequently.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
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    It's a nice bike to me, a crosscheck. Wrapping stuff around the chain kind of defeats it's purpose as it a big linked noose designed to close anywhere along the chain I want (I can fit the end through other link and such).


    Also, the container system isn't something I'm gonna change. I really like the containers, I just need another place to put them. I wish wald made a low front rack system. Cheap and good. Would be nice.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I never wrapped anything around the chain. It was the bike I wrapped in inner tubes. Actually I found it quite convenient to have the chain wrapped around the bike that way. I frequently didn't need to unwrap it all the way.

    Do you need to drink from your container while you're rolling? It's sounding like maybe the way to go is just get front and rear racks and panniers, distribute your stuff, and call it a day.

    Some of my friends were big fans of front racks that sit above the front wheel, even for relatively heavy stuff. Porteur racks. That would give you better accessibility.

    I do find that weighting the hell out of the rear only gives my bike kind of a "wag the dog" handling feel. It's good that you're on a bike with longish chainstays. I had an old race bike before, and that was pretty sketchy with a load of groceries. I've never used front racks or panniers, though. Carrying that much stuff doesn't really fit into how I use my bikes.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
    'Tis but a scratch
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    This could help with the water bottles. 2 x 20 oz, plus another in the standard location will get you to 60 oz.
    Minoura SBH-300 Dual Bottle Cage Bracket - USD $ 9.99

    As for the chain...is it possible you can leave it locked up at the destination. Not sure if you are going to the same location all the time.

    Or again, you could wrap it around the top tube. You may not want to wrap the chain in old tubes to allow more locking lengths, but you could use some old tubes to wrap around the frame to keep the chain from rubbing the paint.

  6. #6
    jrm
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    What about a frame bag

    you might have reinforce the sides of the bag. Water wise, I usually stop along the way.

  7. #7
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    Would this work? I wonder if it will take the weight and if it will get in the way of my front water bottle.


    Frame Pack

    Frame Pack
    Large Image
    Frame Pack
    Product ID: FFP
    Description: The Frame Pac is ingeniously designed to make use of the generally under-utilized space on your bikes frame (below the top tube and behind the head tube). The Frame Pac boasts an extremely steady four-point attachment system: a triple-stitched hook and loop sleeve running the length of the Pac wraps around the top tube, a 1" loop provides additional security, and two 3/4" webbing and cam buckle systems lock down around the tube to provide a positive tensioning system you can count on.
    The Frame Pac features a full-length, zippered pocket that allows easy access to gear on the fly; the new and improved model also provides a second full-length, flat, zippered pocket to keep your stuff organized and accessible. Storm flaps protect both pockets.

    Click here to see Frame Pack Large New for 2013

    Specifications:
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    Dimensions: 6.75 x 16 x 2 (in) 17 x 41 x 5 (cm)
    Weight: 6.1 oz/ 173 g
    Material: Dupont Cordura®

    FIELD NOTES: Once the 3/4" webbing is locked in its cam buckle, the excess webbing should be cut off and the end sealed with a flame, leaving a 1" to 1.5" tail. Starting 2007 the top flaps will be larger allowing oversized tubes to fit.

  8. #8
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I had a beater I rode in New York City, and a big honkin' chain. I wrapped it around the top tube, with a loop around the seat tube.
    My knees would hit that wrapped up chain on every revolution of the cranks. Apparently that didn`t happen to you though, good.

    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Also, the container system isn't something I'm gonna change. I really like the containers, I just need another place to put them.
    aB, it sounds like you already have some kind of bottle or container that you like? If so, one big tank or various smaller bottles, and what size/shape?

    I used to carry a fairly heavy load in handlebar bags on my mtb (probably under 10 pounds, but in that neighborhood). It sucked for lifting the wheel over rocks and other obstacles, but on the road it wouldn`t have been bad as far as handling goes. The problem I think you`d have with it is that most handlebar bags just clamp around the bar, so a few pounds extended just a couple inches tend to rotate down with each little bump. I have the benefit of a bunch of metal working equipment at my disposal, so was able to solve that by making a little aluminum "finger" that clamped around my stem and held up the bottom of my bag mounting plate.

    Those little front platforms that Andrew mentioned in his 2nd response might work well for carrying a bag with your chain and lock. Some mount only to canti studs and to the fender/sidepull brake hole under the fork crown and they`re cheap. I think the Nashbar version occasionally goes on sale for $10 or less, but even full price is pretty good.

    No idea about the frame bag, though they do seem to be getting popular these days. Maybe your LBS carries something similar, so you can wheel your bike in and check water bottle clearance? The other thing that came to my mind was a trunk bag on a rear platform- both of those items can be had for a very small investment.
    Recalculating....

  9. #9
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    I use a clean canteen 64 oz and a 27 oz that I keep in a cage on the down tube.

  10. #10
    weirdo
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    ^^Interresting. Do you have a picture of that 64 oz canteen (bottle?) and its corresponding cage?
    In my eyes, that`s probably the perfect place to carry water, all other methods being things we have to do when your method won`t work for us. What don`t you like about it?
    Recalculating....

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    ^^Interresting. Do you have a picture of that 64 oz canteen (bottle?) and its corresponding cage?
    In my eyes, that`s probably the perfect place to carry water, all other methods being things we have to do when your method won`t work for us. What don`t you like about it?
    What place, what method and what it?

  12. #12
    weirdo
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    64 oz and 27oz Clean Canteen in downtube cages.
    Recalculating....

  13. #13
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    I saw a lot of commuters in San Francisco when I was there who would wear their big heavy chains. Either wear them bandolier-style over the shoulder, or belt-style around their waist.

    Hiplok: Human-Centered Design (Literally) for Urban Cyclists - Core77

    Where's the best place to carry your heavy bike lock? [Archive] - Bike Forums

  14. #14
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    ^^^
    I tried that and found it really unpleasant. But it's certainly an option.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
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    ^^ That, and you look like Marley's Ghost.

    BrianMc

  16. #16
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    ^^ That, and you look like Marley's Ghost.
    Yikes! A rastapedalin!
    Recalculating....

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    ^^Interresting. Do you have a picture of that 64 oz canteen (bottle?) and its corresponding cage?
    In my eyes, that`s probably the perfect place to carry water, all other methods being things we have to do when your method won`t work for us. What don`t you like about it?

    Oh, and it doesn't have a cage, it stays in the panniers unfortunately. I have a cage for the small one.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    I saw a lot of commuters in San Francisco when I was there who would wear their big heavy chains. Either wear them bandolier-style over the shoulder, or belt-style around their waist.

    Hiplok: Human-Centered Design (Literally) for Urban Cyclists - Core77

    Where's the best place to carry your heavy bike lock? [Archive] - Bike Forums

    That hiplock looks slick, but I don't think it'd work for 25 miles each way.

  19. #19
    weirdo
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    Ah, the half gallon doesn`t go on your DT. Sorry- I misunderstood your other post.
    Recalculating....

  20. #20
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    How about a frame mounted hydration unit? I've seen companies who make a 2l unit but you could probably achieve the same goal by buying a frame bag and bladder. As for the lock, I carry a ulock and extension cable in my back pack. That may change since I just got a rack and bag system this weekend. I'm going to see about either carring th lock inside the bag or attaching it to the rack.

  21. #21
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    The topeak modula cage fits a 1.5 liter bottle and is very adjustable.

  22. #22
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    I would place a heavy chain in the middle of my bike. I like the idea of frame bags, I just saw this Ibera frame bag posted in another forum, seems like a good deal: BikePakmart.com - Ibera Bicycle Frame Bag. Bicycle Bags. Top Tube Bags. Carrier Bags.

    looks bigger than the frame pack posted previously

    I have an Ibera phone mount that goes on my handlebars with a bottle cage attached to it. doesn't add much weight with just one water bottle on the handlebars.

  23. #23
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    Option 1:
    Chain - can you wrap it around your seatpost without sticking out and hitting your thighs while riding? If so - I'd say that's the best (Kinda ghetto) spot to put the weight.

    As for the water container - no good ideas.

    Option 2:
    If you are willing to get a rack then I would attach all of it to the rack. If you want to be really awesome - bolt a milk crate to your rack and you can put it all in there. No bag to deal with, and the weight disbursement is pretty good.
    Bikewagon - Hop on!

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  24. #24
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    I already have a rack and rear pannier. The problem is that when I get groceries I end up with too much weight in them and I have a bit of a fish tailing problem.

    On that note, is it better to have the panniers further forward and angled to avoid heel strike, or should I have them perpendicular to the ground (straight upright) and as far forward as I can have them without heel strike, although not as far forward as they'd be if angled?


    And what kind of effect would having front panniers have on the handling? I was thinking that 25-30lbs is the most I should have in the rear on this bike. And then the same up front.

  25. #25
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I think if you boiled your rear pannier position down to one thing, it would be the fore/aft position of the center of mass. So if angling them helps with that, do it.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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