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  1. #1
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    When do you need a dedicated commuter bike?

    At what point is it worth it to buy/convert a bike solely for the purpose of commuting?

    My wife and I used each commute ~15 miles to work; she rode the train, I rode my bike. Since I was putting in so many miles on the nice road bike, I bought a cheap eBay mountain bike (Motobecane) and converted it into a comfortable commuter. A couple of years ago, we had a baby, my wife quit work to stay home, and we moved to a small townhouse 2 mi. from my workplace.

    So I'm still bike commuting, but I'm questioning whether I really need a dedicated commuter bike. Do I need a commuter bike for those 4 mi. every day? Or would I rather sell it off and buy that SS 29er I've been ogling? Thoughts? Anybody else sell off their commuter bike?

    TIA

  2. #2
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    Get yourself the nicest bike your wife will allow. Commuting is much more enjoyable on a bike you actually like.

  3. #3
    a lazy pedaler
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    I think it all depend on your budget vs "what you want"...that is: I want more and more bikes, I just can't afford it

    I'll say keep you actual commuter bike and get your 29er...you already have you comfortable commuter and I would only change mine for another comfortable commuter...

    ohh is that what you want to do with your new 29er? SS? are you going to have that 4mi commute for a while?...no plans for moving again?....that is something you should think about too...are you sure you won't need the gears of your moto later on?

    Quote Originally Posted by JAG410
    Commuting is much more enjoyable on a bike you actually like.
    there is a lot of true in this...adding that it won't necessary mean the nicest bling bling bike.

  4. #4
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    Well, I certainly thought that this thread was going to be asking the polar opposite question...the 'when should I get a commuter?', not the 'when should I get rid of a commuter?'.

    Is there some reason you can't have both? Keep your current dedicated commuter, buy the shiny new SS29.

    Use which ever one you feel like riding on a daily basis, and after about 6 months if you notice that you haven't ridden your commuter, then maybe look into selling it.
    Or keep it.
    Because too many bikes is never a bad thing.
    Everypony loves riding bikes

  5. #5
    lives to ride
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    SS 29er?

    I couldn't justify a 29er and a commuter specific bike, so I made my Haro Mary SS a "dinglespeed". As in, I had an off road gear ratio, and an on road gear ratio. It had a similar enough chain tension that I didn't really have to adjust my EBB after changing gears.

    What you could do, is have two wheelsets - one with some nice 700x37c (or thereabouts) slicks, and one with some 29er tread. Easy fixed!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasevr4
    SS 29er?

    I couldn't justify a 29er and a commuter specific bike, so I made my Haro Mary SS a "dinglespeed". As in, I had an off road gear ratio, and an on road gear ratio. It had a similar enough chain tension that I didn't really have to adjust my EBB after changing gears.

    What you could do, is have two wheelsets - one with some nice 700x37c (or thereabouts) slicks, and one with some 29er tread. Easy fixed!

    I agree....two wheelsets

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by x-ker
    Because too many bikes is never a bad thing.
    Too small a garage, too small a budget, or too intolerant a spouse, maybe...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Too small a garage, too small a budget, or too intolerant a spouse, maybe...
    Whoa, two out of three ain't bad! We have a tiny little townhouse that barely fits the our bikes and Chariot. I'm a high school teacher, so we have more time than money. BUT my wife also rides. So, we each have a mountain bike and a road bike, in addition to my commuter bike.

    I'm leaning toward selling the commuter and building up a 29er "dinglespeed" like jasevr4 suggests. I figure even if my "road" gear is still pretty spinny, I'm only going 2 mi. at a time anyway. I don't know if I could swing two wheelsets, though - maybe compromise and get some semi-slick tires like the WTB Vulpine.

  9. #9
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    2 miles each way on a ss 29er is not a big deal. I wouldn't even call it commuting.you could probably walk in as much time as it takes to gear up, check tires, ride, lock up, and arrive... am I right?
    my point is, no wrong answer. if you sell your commuter to afford a new mtb, you still have the choice of the road bike to commute with, corrrect?

  10. #10
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    Fenders, dynamo light, racks, panniers.... lots of accessories that make the commuting more enjoyable and easy and not so much for performance cycling.

  11. #11
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    There are reasons why people buy a dedicated commuter bike - none of these reasons may apply to you, if they don't then you don't need a 2nd dedicated commuter bike. :-)

    1. To expensive to be locked up outside all day while you're at work, afraid the bike or your bike parts (do you know how much a Dura-Ace derailler costs? lol) might be stolen.

    2. You need to carry stuff back and forth and your current bike can't do it. (Though you can put a bike rack on most anything.)

    3. You ride in the rain and don't want to expose your "good" bike to the elements, or leave it sitting outside all day while it gets rained on. (This never actually stops me, but it bothers some people).

    4. Your current bike won't take big enough tires for your conditions - usually this applies to snow/winter biking, occasionally the summer bike if the road conditions are really, really bad. Or maybe you just like a comfier ride. :-)

    At the last location I worked I could ride my high end bike to work and lock it up out front as we had live security watching the parking lot (and the bike rack which was in front of the building). At our new location, sadly, the "bike rack" is in an obscure corner of the parking garage and I'm not comfortable leaving anything more expensive than my "commuter" bike locked up there.

  12. #12
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    OT, but years ago in school, a buddy road a junkyard dog bike almost everywhere. This bike started out as a cheap 10-speed with the name of a hardware store on the frame and went down hill from there.

    But there was one advantage: he could just drop it anywhere and trust that it would be there when he got back...as long as somebody didn't throw it in the dumpster. Which happened once because the dorm super got tired of seeing it laying alongside the entry walk.

    When I think commuter bike, that's what comes to mind.

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