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  1. #1
    Beetlejuice!
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    Wheelset upgrade - opinions

    Hey folks. The time has come for my Mavic CXP 21's to go, so I'm looking at upgrading a wheelset. Obviously I want to get the most for my money here, but I also don't want to spend a lot....the bike I'm on is a Scott Sportster, not totally in love with it but it gets the job done...the whole bike new only cost $400, I've got an extra $100 into it converting to a ss and some other upgrades...I want quality but I don't want to spend as much as the bike cost new on wheels. So here is my dilemma:

    Due to some miscommunication last week at the LBS my rear wheel was not fixed in time for me to pick it up for the Bike MS event I was riding in. They sent me on my way with a borrowed wheel and offered to sell me a set of new Shimano R500's for $150. I thought about it over the weekend and decided to just go with the Shimano's but when I got there to purchase today, now the price was $225 and no lower.

    After I said no way, they offered me a set of Alex ACE 19's with unknown hubs/spokes for $150. I wasn't impressed with the wheelset that much and felt the price was probably high on those as well, so I left to head back to work and do some internet searching.

    While searching I came across a set of Mavic Ksyrium Elite's on craigslist for $400, along with a set of Bontrager Selects for $170. The Shimanos I can pick up at Pricepoint for about $120.

    I'm looking for opinions on these different wheelsets, the values, and how well they will stack up for commuting....also open to other wheelset recommendations. I commute between 50-80 miles per week, about 3 miles of that on paved canals, the rest on mostly poorly maintained bike lanes. Generally the Bike MS event is the only 'extra race' - type event I do with the bike throughout the year, but I have been thinking of doing a bit of touring this summer. Occasional fun rides on the weekends. Its basically my go-to bike when I'm not on the MTB.

    The Ksyrium is what was lent to me last weekend and I really liked the wheel, but I've also read some bad reviews about dealing with Mavic in the long-term for repairs. I'm generally not a Shimano fan and the reviews for those wheels seem to be luke-warm. I know nothing about the Alex or Bontragers.
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  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I think whoever invented the 32-spoke cross-3 wheel is kicking himself because it's just really hard to improve upon.

    http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com.../prod_169.html

    I've had my Shimano 105 hubs for a decade. The Open Pro is a little lighter than a CXP rim, but has an excellent reputation.

    This is assuming you use a single cog on a freehub. (What kind of rear hub do you use?)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    Beetlejuice!
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    I was just reading about the Open Pros and they seem like a good choice.

    And yes, its a single cog on a freehub.
    "too weird to live, too rare to die" - HST
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  4. #4
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    Wow, I was hoping to wake up this morning to more opinions but I guess not. The search continues.
    "too weird to live, too rare to die" - HST
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  5. #5
    Squeaky Wheel
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    The Scott Sportsters I am seeing are disc brake but it sounds like you are riding rim brakes?

    I run discs on my commuter with Mavic Speedcity wheels. I do about 180 miles/week and have about 7500 miles on these wheels. Combination of smooth and crappy roads. They are still running as true as the day I took them out of the box and mounted them up. A little expensive, but I as of today I am happy to have spent the extra $$. Good luck in your search.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solrider
    I was just reading about the Open Pros and they seem like a good choice.

    And yes, its a single cog on a freehub.
    Hard to go wrong with the Open Pros. I've put about 4000 commuting miles on mine over the past couple of years. Heavy paniers, sh*tty streets, bunny hopping off the curb at work every night. No problem. Still true and strong. All that and quite light too! You could do a LOT worse.

  7. #7
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    I've gone through 2 sets of Open Pros over the last 5 or 6 years. Great rim, but I got sick of replacing such a spendy rim on my commuter due to the sidewalls of the rim wearing out in the nasty conditions we have here in the PNW. Last summer I got the hubs built up with the Sun ME14A, no complaints so far and they are holding up good at a much cheaper price than the Mavics.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    My commuter has a Weinmann on the back and something Schwinn-approved on the front.

    The Weinmann was maybe overdoing it for cheap. Maybe I'll try the ME14A next time. Did you do the build itself, or get it done?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan
    I've gone through 2 sets of Open Pros over the last 5 or 6 years. Great rim, but I got sick of replacing such a spendy rim on my commuter due to the sidewalls of the rim wearing out in the nasty conditions we have here in the PNW.
    Open Pro Ceramics are pricey, but have a much more durable braking surface.
    Ride more!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    My commuter has a Weinmann on the back and something Schwinn-approved on the front.

    The Weinmann was maybe overdoing it for cheap. Maybe I'll try the ME14A next time. Did you do the build itself, or get it done?
    I did not build them, I have had Universal Cycles do the work and reusing my hubs.


    Quote Originally Posted by asphaltdude
    Open Pro Ceramics are pricey, but have a much more durable braking surface.
    I looked at the Ceramic Open Pros, but I have 28h hubs and could not find the 28h Ceramic Open Pros.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan
    I've gone through 2 sets of Open Pros over the last 5 or 6 years. Great rim, but I got sick of replacing such a spendy rim on my commuter due to the sidewalls of the rim wearing out in the nasty conditions we have here in the PNW. Last summer I got the hubs built up with the Sun ME14A, no complaints so far and they are holding up good at a much cheaper price than the Mavics.
    Ah, I can see that as a problem. I run mine with discs, so the rim wear is not an issue at all. As asphaltdude mentions below, some of the surfacing options can make a BIG difference. My wife and I both have the open pros. Mine are the "couche dure" surface, while hers are bare aluminum. I'd seriously worry about commuting every day in grotty conditions on hers with rim brakes. Mine? Not so much. Whatever they do to the CD rims makes that surface seem pretty hard. Of course, that's just my impression since I have not run a rim brake over 'em.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the continued info. I have the bottom of the barrel Sportster, so rim brakes not disc, full rigid.

    I think right now its down to the Open Pros and the Speed Citys. I did in the mean time pick up another set of CXP21's but with some 105's, used which I'm enjoying much more than my crappy 2200's I had before. Definitely sticking with the 105's and the CXP's will get me through until I can save the $$ for what I really want, then have a decent back-up set.

    I'm interested to hear any more opinions on the Open Pros vs Speed Citys.

    Thanks everyone!
    "too weird to live, too rare to die" - HST
    "Oh Gravity, thou art a heartless *****" - Sheldon

  13. #13
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I'm confused about your bike.

    I just googled Scott Sportster. Hadn't realized it was some sort of hybrid.

    Do you use disc or rim brakes?

    What's your dropout spacing?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
    Squeaky Wheel
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    Speedcitys are disc-only wheels, no braking surface on the rims, so you would have to switch to disc brakes on order to use these wheels.

  15. #15
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    Ahh bummer about the disc only, sounds like the Open Pro's are the ticket then.

    This is the bike I have: http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...20P6&Type=bike

    Spacing is 130
    "too weird to live, too rare to die" - HST
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  16. #16
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    I wouldn't limit yourself to mavic open pros. I have seen and have good luck with others. I personally like velocity rims or sun ringle more. the mavic rims do have eyelets but that just means the rim cracks around the eyeley instead of the spoke hole and by then your brake track is probably trashed. My last rant against the open pros is they are overpriced in comparison and relatively narrow.

  17. #17
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    130mm spacing and no disc brakes means you can't have the Speedcity set. You need a relatively traditional road wheel, with the same diameter as your current wheels and a 130mm-spaced road rear hub.

    harvestlaser makes a couple good points. If you like big, fat commuter tires, you'll likely be happier with a slightly wider rim. Even if you prefer a road tire, there are other rims. The OP has a bit of a premium associated with it because it's the rim that any other road rim has to improve upon. So while I think it would be hard to beat for a rim for a traditional road bike, used with a road tire, although DT Swiss has some offerings that are just as well-regarded, you're not on a traditional road bike and we don't know what kind of tire you like. I do think you'll have a hard time getting as good a price on a traditional road wheel as what BWW offers, but Dimension or Handspun might offer something competitive. Ask your shop about it - they'd be able to order either from QBP.

    What's wrong with your wheels anyway? The CXP 22's a little heavy, but otherwise a fine rim...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    130mm spacing and no disc brakes means you can't have the Speedcity set. You need a relatively traditional road wheel, with the same diameter as your current wheels and a 130mm-spaced road rear hub.

    harvestlaser makes a couple good points. If you like big, fat commuter tires, you'll likely be happier with a slightly wider rim. Even if you prefer a road tire, there are other rims. The OP has a bit of a premium associated with it because it's the rim that any other road rim has to improve upon. So while I think it would be hard to beat for a rim for a traditional road bike, used with a road tire, although DT Swiss has some offerings that are just as well-regarded, you're not on a traditional road bike and we don't know what kind of tire you like. I do think you'll have a hard time getting as good a price on a traditional road wheel as what BWW offers, but Dimension or Handspun might offer something competitive. Ask your shop about it - they'd be able to order either from QBP.

    What's wrong with your wheels anyway? The CXP 22's a little heavy, but otherwise a fine rim...
    These are actually CXP 21's both the old and new set. The rear wheel finally cracked and the front is having a hard time staying true on the old set so I figured it was a good excuse to upgrade. Since I've gone ahead and picked up another set of 21's used I'd like to take my time and figure out a good wheelset to eventually upgrade to for commuting and touring.

    I recently switched my tires to 700x25 Specialized Armadillos and I'm loving them!
    "too weird to live, too rare to die" - HST
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  19. #19
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Ever try 28mm tires?

    If you're killing your rims with 23s, going to more of a touring setup might work better. Get a little wider rim too, maybe even something marketed for a 29er. 36 spokes seems like it wouldn't be a bad idea.

    Maybe something like this.

    http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com...s/prod_73.html

    36 spokes is a little uncommon in a built wheel lately, but certainly not impossible. It would be very hard to keep this project in-budget if you had to order individual components.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  20. #20
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    Well I don't now how much of it was the age/history of the wheels and how much of it was me. I've never actually purchased a new set of wheels, only used and with that you never know how much they were abused by the previous owner. I'll be interested to see how long this next set of wheels lasts me on my commute with the 25's, thats really as big as I'd like to go in a tire.

    Thank you for all of the suggestions!
    "too weird to live, too rare to die" - HST
    "Oh Gravity, thou art a heartless *****" - Sheldon

  21. #21
    Another Retro Grouch
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    Open Pros are too light, go with the Shimano 105s/Open Sports or something with Mavic A319.

    http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com.../prod_140.html

    http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com...s/prod_73.html

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