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  1. #1
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    What's the best bike lock out now?

    What would be the best bike lock out now for around town use? Been away from cycling a few years and about to pick up mtn and hybrid bikes again.

  2. #2
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    Idea!

    I like the 12mm cable/lock I got from these guys; http://www.onguardlock.com/ All their products should be solid.

  3. #3
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    It really depends on where you lock it, how long you leave it and how much the bike is worth to you.

    All locks are defeatable and the longer it takes to defeat a lock, the less inclined a thief is to try and break it.

    If it's a beater and you're not overly concerned then a basic cable lock will suffice. However these take less than 20 seconds to cut- no matter how thick with or without 'sheilding'. U-locks and Chains are the best deterrents but you get what you pay for. Regardless of brand, if you want the best protection it's going to cost around $100 and the lock will weigh quite a bit. Personally, I use a Kryptonite New York U-lock for a $600 bike.


    Abus and Trelock (german brands) have recently released 'folding locks' which aren't as strong as a chain or U-lock are worlds better than a cable lock with the same about of flexibility whilst also being easy to transport on the bike or in a bag. I believe Abus recently released a high-grade folding lock which might be worth looking into.

    Check out this for more detailed info.

  4. #4
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    The saddest thing about people today is that no matter what lock you use it won’t
    prevent some F’ing a*****e from vandalizing your ride.

  5. #5
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    Upset

    t won’t
    prevent some F’ing a*****e from vandalizing your ride.

  6. #6
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    I personally use an OnGuard Double Team (big shackle with a cable). The shackle I am using came in second in the tests I read. The hands-down winner was the Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit New York shackle lock. It is insanely heavy because the shackle is made of very thick hardened steel. However, in cutting resistance...it is in a league of its own.

    The OnGuard lasted 18 seconds against a battery powered cutting tool (the choice of professional thieves). The Kryptonite took 10 minutes!!! Not many thieves are going to spend that kind of time trying to steal a bike. If your bike is expensive...get that lock. If your bike is not so expensive, the OnGuard is also very good. In any case, if you must park your bike for a while, lock it in an open place where there are people walking by. That will improve your chances.

    If you need to chain your bike to something immovable...the Fahgettaboudit New York chain is the answer. However...all of this comes at a serious weight penalty. The shackle and chain together will probably outweigh your bike...something on the order of 25 pounds!!

    You asked for best. That currently is the best.

  7. #7
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    Scuba divers say that you don't have to outswim the shark, just another diver.

    A parallel can be drawn to locks. You don't need the strongest lock in the world, which may also be the heaviest, You only need enough of a lock to convince the thief that there's easier pickings elsewhere nearby.

    At the high end of the range U-locks with 5/8" shackles or high quality chains are the way to go for commuters in major cities. Suburban cyclists can get by with standard 1/2" U-locks, or heavy cables, For a quick trip to the ice cream joint any light duty cable will do.

    Often how or where you lock the bike is more important than the lock itself. Lock to rigid objects, in such a way as to make it difficult to break the lock without damaging the bike.

    I prefer to lock through the seatstays, since experienced thieves know that they're unlikely to be able to pry or lever the lock without crushing them. No one wants to steal an unsaleable bike. Also try to use up all of the lock, cable or chain giving thieves less access to their favorite points of attack.

  8. #8
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    I like to use the following best bike lock method:

    - Master Lock 8200D Street Cuffs 12" - lock cuff to rear tire through rear triangle and fixed object (Sheldon Brown method). Make sure fixed object is wider on top or secure so bike and lock cannot be lifted up and over (not street sign that can easily be unbolted).
    - Kryptonite Kryptoflex 3/8" x 7' cable - loop cable through rear wheel, saddle, front wheel, and frame.
    - Sesamee K436 4 dial combo lock - paddle lock both ends of cable to rear disc brake.

    I like this method because the street cuffs do not allow enough space to leverage open (especially with thick mtn bike tire). Even if the chain link is broken between the cuffs the cuff on the rear tire will keep them from riding away. They could cut the cuff on the tire or cut the rear wheel and rim but probably not worth the hassle and bike damage for the common thief. If they cut through the Krypto cable the combo lock on the disc break will still keep them from riding away quickly. The combo lock cannot be picked. I've heard rumors about picking the master cuffs with bic pens but find little evidence to support it. If anything they are much more difficult to pick than the old U locks.

    If you go this route don't waste your $ on the street cuff holster. I shackle both cuffs around my top tube and loop the cable through them and around the seat post and secure the cable with the combo lock when I ride.

    Note: This lockmethod does add some weight to the bike but for me it's worth it living in the city and riding to local trails 7 miles away. I like to make stops for refreshments and most would be bike thieves keep walking when they see what they're up against.

  9. #9
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    Kryptonite New York forgetaboutit is the best lock on the market, but ive got one and its really heavy, id buy one of the models down from that.
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyguy0683 View Post
    I like to use the following best bike lock method:

    - Master Lock 8200D Street Cuffs 12" - lock cuff to rear tire through rear triangle and fixed object (Sheldon Brown method). Make sure fixed object is wider on top or secure so bike and lock cannot be lifted up and over (not street sign that can easily be unbolted).
    - Kryptonite Kryptoflex 3/8" x 7' cable - loop cable through rear wheel, saddle, front wheel, and frame.
    - Sesamee K436 4 dial combo lock - paddle lock both ends of cable to rear disc brake.

    I like this method because the street cuffs do not allow enough space to leverage open (especially with thick mtn bike tire). Even if the chain link is broken between the cuffs the cuff on the rear tire will keep them from riding away. They could cut the cuff on the tire or cut the rear wheel and rim but probably not worth the hassle and bike damage for the common thief. If they cut through the Krypto cable the combo lock on the disc break will still keep them from riding away quickly. The combo lock cannot be picked. I've heard rumors about picking the master cuffs with bic pens but find little evidence to support it. If anything they are much more difficult to pick than the old U locks.

    If you go this route don't waste your $ on the street cuff holster. I shackle both cuffs around my top tube and loop the cable through them and around the seat post and secure the cable with the combo lock when I ride.

    Note: This lockmethod does add some weight to the bike but for me it's worth it living in the city and riding to local trails 7 miles away. I like to make stops for refreshments and most would be bike thieves keep walking when they see what they're up against.
    lol, hold on ive just been sucked into a thread from 4 years ago by Cyguy on your 1st post lol, although it was a great first post Cy, try and find a few recent posts to answer instead of one from 2008.
    in any case, welcome to the site mate, and nice first post.....
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  11. #11
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    Lol, what is a post and what is a thread? They seem to contradict each other. I'm not into sucking or deer piss but mtbr rules!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyguy0683 View Post
    Lol, what is a post and what is a thread? They seem to contradict each other. I'm not into sucking or deer piss but mtbr rules!!
    LOL, a thread is what we are talking in as created by the original poster 4 years ago, and a post is what im writing now, im answering your post lol

    And as to your last line 'im not into sucking or deerpiss but mtbr rules'' ive got no idea what your talking about with that one lol
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  13. #13
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    I've got a NY Fahgettaboudit U-lock that I leave locked to the rack at work because it's so heavy. For carrying with my to use while running errands and what-not, I use a regular Kryptonite Mini Evo U-lock (paired w/ a 3' Kryptonite cable if I'm riding a bike with a QR front skewer). I live in Houston, which isn't the safest city to be in, but feel safe with this setup.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyguy0683 View Post
    Lol, what is a post and what is a thread? They seem to contradict each other. I'm not into sucking or deer piss but mtbr rules!!
    A post is what I am doing now. Basically each individual reply that people make is a post.

    A thread is the whole string of posts put together.

    Guessing you already know what the search feature is since you dug this up.
    Either that, or you were searching google and thread showed up there.

    Welcome to mtbr and don't forget to get your chiclets.

  15. #15
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    Gotta say...The forums have made me somewhat paranoid haha - researching locks as we speak

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by C-Kryt View Post
    Gotta say...The forums have made me somewhat paranoid haha - researching locks as we speak
    I did EXTENSIVE research on bike locks (living in Hoboken, NJ apparently there is a group of bike thieves - recently busted a ring of them and found over 50 bikes!)

    After researching, I went with 2 options.

    1. Kryptonie Series 4 Integrated Chain Lock I purchased from Merlin Cycles (great price online and fast shipping) - first impressions are it is HEAVY but very strong - most likely will be the lock I use in my garage or if I commute into the city and lock it up for a longer period of time.

    2. I also picked up a Kryptonite series 2 mini integrated chain along with a Kryptonite Cable to secure the front tire - havent received that yet but from what I read it is a great choice and much lighter than the series 4 but still stout.

    Good luck with your research!

  17. #17
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    Look up pragmasis chains and abloy, mul-t-lock, and abus locks (or maybe some sergeant and green if you got the money.)

    Pragmasis chains are a little lighter and stronger than others.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by idwelltvbag View Post
    Scuba divers say that you don't have to outswim the shark, just another diver.
    Why I always try and ride with somebody slower than me.
    That way I don't have to outrun the bear.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DevsP3 View Post
    I did EXTENSIVE research on bike locks (living in Hoboken, NJ apparently there is a group of bike thieves - recently busted a ring of them and found over 50 bikes!)
    I met a long time childhood friend through a Bike theif ring. Yup, it's true but not how it sounds. I traded bikes with these guys from around the cornor once in my younger BMX days. That day I rode around showing it off to some friends when one of them recignized the bike. They told me it looked just like a guys bike they knew and it had recently been stolen. So I asked If they knew where the guy lived and if they had his address. I rode the bike to his house and knocked on his door. Turned out it was his bike and we contacted the police. His parents gave me a ride home and we've been friend ever since. The police found about a dozen bikes at those guys place and I got my original bike back that was used on the trade.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by majura View Post
    It really depends on where you lock it, how long you leave it and how much the bike is worth to you.

    All locks are defeatable and the longer it takes to defeat a lock, the less inclined a thief is to try and break it.

    If it's a beater and you're not overly concerned then a basic cable lock will suffice. However these take less than 20 seconds to cut- no matter how thick with or without 'sheilding'. U-locks and Chains are the best deterrents but you get what you pay for. Regardless of brand, if you want the best protection it's going to cost around $100 and the lock will weigh quite a bit. Personally, I use a Kryptonite New York U-lock for a $600 bike.


    Abus and Trelock (german brands) have recently released 'folding locks' which aren't as strong as a chain or U-lock are worlds better than a cable lock with the same about of flexibility whilst also being easy to transport on the bike or in a bag. I believe Abus recently released a high-grade folding lock which might be worth looking into.

    Check out this for more detailed info.
    I will admit, I really like this lock, it is just a cool idea.
    Although it doesn't appear to be the most secure, it seems sufficiently secure and definitely the most practical.

    I don't live in a high theft area.
    In fact I see bikes left unlocked all the time and still not stolen.
    However, I think those people are sometimes just tempting fate.
    That being said, if I get a commuter bike like I plan, this would probably be the lock I choose.

  21. #21
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    I picked up a new bike lock today: On Guard Brute. The brute uses a much thicker shackle than he standard On Guard Ulock for one thing. The base or locking device is noticeably larger in diameter as well. Anyhow, I figured I would give it a try.

    Amazon.com: OnGuard Brute STD 5001 Bike U-Lock: Sports & Outdoors
    2007 FS KHS XC104
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  22. #22
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    The best chains money can buy is probably Almax and Pragmasis. I'm probably gonna get the 10 or 11mm or what they have for my next bike, (and I will test it to destruction at my job, sledgehammer, anglegrinder, hacksaw, liquid nitrogen, croppers, everything we have really, my coworkers would just LOVE to destroy my new fancy chain good luck suckers I say.. call me when your're done)

    Kryptonite and all the other amateurs are pretty much just BS crapola. a serious thief get through one of those in like 10 seconds max.

    The squire closed shackle locks seems to be the best constructed ones too. not expensive either.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

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    Specialized sucks ass.

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