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  1. #1
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    What size road bike frame do I need?

    I'm 6'2" with a long torso and short arms and legs. No I don't smell like cabbage, LOL.

    I measured with a tape measure my leg inseam at about 30 inches. From the ground to the where the legs of my pants join. Is this my stand over height?

    I currently ride a 21" frame mountain bike.

    So what size road frame will fit? I'm looking at an 07 Jamis Eclipse, FYI. Size 59 is the largest my store has in stock.

  2. #2
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    Only You Can Answer That

    Road fit is far more important that MTB frame fit.

    Try, try, and try again until you find something that works for you. If you're serious about spending a lot of time on a road bike get a professional frame fitting.

    And now to guess wildly I'd say a 59cm frame would probably be close in the toptube length department but maybe a touch big for your inseam.
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  3. #3
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    In the days of horizontal top tubes and 230mm seatposts, road sizing was pretty critical, today's sloping top tubes and long seatposts afford you more lattitude.

    Assuming you measured the inseam right (30" is pretty short for someone 6'2") you'd ride a 58-60cm (23-24") horizontal top tube road frame. If you buy a sloping tube model choose the frabe within a range from about 20-24" according to which gives you the best handlebar position.

    Generally taller road frames are slightly longer seat to stem, plus the sloping TT models place the stem higher vs the seat, so you're going to have to actually try a few to see which best fits your long torso/short arm body.

    You can spend dough for a fitting, but for your purposes you'd OK by trying a few different bikes in your size range. In the end you'll pick the closest fit & dial it in by changing the stem length and angle if needed.

  4. #4
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    How So?

    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY
    In the days of horizontal top tubes and 230mm seatposts, road sizing was pretty critical, today's sloping top tubes and long seatposts afford you more lattitude.
    A frame with a sloping top tube is still only going to 'fit' the same range of people as a horizontal top tube frame. Sloping top tubes afford more standover in MTBs and decreased weight and increased stiffness in road bikes but they do little to change the fit.

    Sure, someone that's 5'4" can now get a sloping tt frame with a 59cm ett and sit on it but they won't be able to ride it very comfortably.
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  5. #5
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    I weigh 225 lbs. Is there any need to worry that the bike won't hold my weight?

  6. #6
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    My son is 6'1" and rides a 58cm Trek bike. He could ride either this or a 60cm bike.

    Measure your cycling inseam standing barefoot on the floor, and jamming a narrow-spined hardback book up into your crotch. Push pretty firmly into your crotch. Use a book so that you can align one edge of it flat against the wall, and will know that the edge against your crotch is parallel to the floor. Now measure to the top edge of the book with a ruler.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne
    A frame with a sloping top tube is still only going to 'fit' the same range of people as a horizontal top tube frame. Sloping top tubes afford more standover in MTBs and decreased weight and increased stiffness in road bikes but they do little to change the fit.

    Sorry, but with all due respect, I beg to differ.

    In a horizontal top tube/short post configuration, fit was constrained by standover height at the high end, and by maximum seat and stem height at the low end. This left a narrow band of workable sizes.

    The sloping top tube and long post configuration, widens the band at the low end of the range using the longer seat post travel, and higher comparative head tube. Lack of adjustability of threadless stems vs quill stems reduces handlebar height adjustment somewhat, but stem angles can be changed if needed.

    There's still the issue of frame length (seat to stem) but this has always varied builder to builder, so actually trying a number of bikes, and/or changing stem extension is still important.

    fb

  8. #8
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    6'2" here...

    I ride 21" MTB and my road bikes are all 60cm -- my inseam is 34".
    59cm might work just right for you but there are a number of variables regarding quality fit.
    Do some test rides on different size 58cm - 60cm and see how they feel.
    Good luck

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by brain3278
    I weigh 225 lbs. Is there any need to worry that the bike won't hold my weight?
    Your weight isn't an issue, if you use some common sense. Don't run out and buy the lightest components, which isn't a bad deal because good B-line stuff costs less anyway.

    Overall weight isn't necessarilly a good predictor of wear and tear, riding style can be a bigger factor.

    Over the years I've ridden with gorillas who rode like ballerinas and never broke anything, and ballerinas who road like gorillas, and beat the crap out of their bikes.

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