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  1. #1
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    What happens when you need to change a flat while using Stan's?

    I've gotten so many damn puncture using my marathon green guards lately that I'm starting to think it'd be cheaper to just use the Stan's system.

    1) What happens if you get a flat while using Stan's? How do you fix it?

    2) Can I just put this stuff in the tubes themselves? How?

    3) Would the tubeless system work with tk540 rims and marathon green guard tires?


    I don't really give a crap about weight. I just want to not have flats! Good tubes are $10 a pop now. ****ing outrageous.

  2. #2
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    1) Carry a spare tube and put it in the tire, although if you flat with stan's, it's typically a pretty huge hole and even the tube might stick out.

    2) You can if you have removable valve stem cores.

    3) You'd have to go with a stan's conversion kit or similar as these wheels aren't tubeless. Depending on the tires and how much pressure you run, it may not work. You shouldn't run non-UST/TLR tires on non-UST rims with high pressure. The tire could blow off the wheels.

    $10 are some expensive tubes. I don't think I've ever paid more than $5, I usually get Bontrager tubes because that's what the LBS I go to sells.

    Another question, when you do flat, do you very carefully inspect the inside of the tire to make sure whatever punctured it is out? Seems like you're getting far more flats than you should be. I ride over glass on a daily basis, nails many days and I almost never flat. Also, what pressure are you running and what size tires? Are you making sure not to pinch the tubes when you put in new ones?

  3. #3
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    No big deal to throw a tube in if you get a flat with sealant. It's a little messy in there because of the goo, but you just pull out your valve stem that you're using for the tubeless set-up, and put in a tube. The stan's liner (or gorilla tape like I use) acts as a rim strip.

    Google the Stan's "Injector" for putting goo into a tube. Like Straz said, removable core tubes, it's easy... I put sealant in my kid's tubes. The injector is a syringe that threads to your valve stem.

    Just about any rim can be set up tubeless.... do a search on the forums or google for "Gorilla Tape Tubeless". I use gorilla tape, cut valve stems out of old tubes, and mix up my own homebrew sealant (about $20 per gallon...lasts 2 or 3 years depending on how much I give away). You can do it cheap.
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  4. #4
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    All Schrader valves have removable cores, but only some Prestas do.

    The prestas usually look like this, with the top part a different color with wrenchflats on the side:



    Continental prestas have removable cores, and I think Kendas do too.

    I did tubeless. I thought it was a hassle and went back to tubes. In my toolpack I always carry 2oz sealant, a valve core remover, and a little plastic syringe from the drugstore. If I get a flat I just add some sealant to the tube, so it's basically homemade slime tubes ondemand.

  5. #5
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    ^^ That's a good idea packing sealant instead of a patch kit. Quick and easy for thorns, etc.

    I think I have seen Bontrager tubes wtih removable core presta valves also.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  6. #6
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    Is there a catch with running Stan's in tubes? How do you get the boogers out?

    And that fix is pretty permanent?

  7. #7
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    I've only done it once, but that was last winter and I haven't had problems since.

    I don't ever plan to get the boogers out, and assume I will eventually just toss the tube. But if I had a mystery leak when I ran tubeless I'd add all 2oz of my emergency supply (on top of the 4~6oz that was already in there at the start). With the leaky tube I probably added .5oz, so chances of boogers are pretty low.

    I'm probably still in the "testing" phase. I really liked tubeless at first, but eventually got sick of it. I currently like my homemade slime tubes, but I'm not sure how well it would work if a little piece of glass was embedded in the casing and just kept rubbing holes in the tube?

    The good thing about my way is that it's cheap and easy. Buy 2oz of stans, get a tube with a removable core, and get a core removal tool (for schrader you need a cheap one from an auto store, and for presta you just need an adjustable wrench). Worst case you're out $5 and one tube.

    Tubeless is fun too, but requires a lot more effort upfront.

  8. #8
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    You flush the tubes periodically to prevent boogers from forming in the first place.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    I don't really give a crap about weight. I just want to not have flats! Good tubes are $10 a pop now. ****ing outrageous.
    ok, I'll bite: what exactly is a "good" tube and how is it better than a $2 tube? Clearly it's not flat-resistance.

  10. #10
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    It holds air well. Some of the cheap tubes don't. Schwalbe tests all their tubes before they box them.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    It holds air well. Some of the cheap tubes don't. Schwalbe tests all their tubes before they box them.
    My "cheap" tubes hold air great. I check the pressure every few commutes and am surprised if I lost more than a couple PSI.

  12. #12
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    Thought of this thread this morning. I started getting shot in the leg by tubeless goo this morning, and I thought I was going to need to throw the tube in.... rear tire, something poked a nice hole between the treads. I stopped, put a finger on the hole, rotated the tire so the hole was on the bottom (for better goo coverage), waited a few seconds, then spun the tire...

    ...and got shot in the face with goo. Repeat steps 1-3 a couple more times, and it sealed up I put in some air and rode the remaining 6ish miles to work with no issues. That was a close one. Almost had to come in here and confess that I had to put a tube in
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  13. #13
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    Great is when they only lose that couple PSI over a period of a month.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    You flush the tubes periodically to prevent boogers from forming in the first place.
    How do you flush them out? I'm figuring with water, but how do you get it in there?


    And just to make sure, all I need to make Stan's tubes are tubes with removable valve cores, the syringy thing from Stan's, a core removal tool, the Stan's goop, and that's it?

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