Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    428

    New question here. Vibration solutions?

    I'm riding an old full rigid aluminum MTB with a heavy-duty steel fork and 80psi tires for my daily 25 mile round trip commute. The roads around here are really rough and the pounding is getting old.

    I was thinking about getting a carbon handlebar to replace my aluminum one but I don't know if that would make much difference. Does anyone here have suggestions or ideas?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    175
    Carbon bars definately help...but don't go cheap. I run Easton carbon bars and they are fantastic!!!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    699
    What size tires are you running? Fat (2") slick-esque tires could help.

  4. #4
    Which way? Uphill.
    Reputation: nepbug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    825
    When I was riding a rigid aluminum with skinny tires I found that fatter tires and thicker grips did wonders. I had some Serfas ergo grips that were ridiculously comfortable.
    Blog

    Just keep spinning. Just keep running. Just keep paddling.
    Just keep moving forward.

  5. #5
    occupation : Foole
    Reputation: Fuelish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,545
    How about an old Girvin FlexStem ???!!!??? j/k.....but I do have one on my (very) old dust-collecting beater of a back-up bike. Still have a few spare elastomers, even

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    428
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuelish
    How about an old Girvin FlexStem ???!!!??? j/k.....but I do have one on my (very) old dust-collecting beater of a back-up bike. Still have a few spare elastomers, even
    No joke! I was kind of looking for one of those but I have a one-off 1.25" threaded headset that makes it nearly impossible to find a stem that will fit. I might be able to use a Chris King Devolution adapter to get it to 1.125" but I don't want to spend too much on this old dog.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SteveF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,455
    Getcha a set of Big Apples and float to work! (seriously, they smooth out the bumps nicely)

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    699
    Yeah big apples were my solution to everything.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    6,710

    Agreed, fatter tires....

    help. And there are plenty of tires in the 2.0 range that are pavement specific. My personal favorites are Bontrager Select Invert 2.0's run at 40psi. I won't go smaller around here either, crappy midwest roads! The trade off of course is a 2.0 is a bit heavier than a 1.5 or 1.25, and they roll a little slower due to a bit wider contact patch. But they are smoother over the rougher sections and roll way better than a knobby. There are plenty of other manufacturers that offer similar tires in the same width or wider. Carbon bars will also help, but as citybiker noted, don't go cheap. Easton, Titec, Race Face, and others make excellent carbon bars. Another suggestion previously noted would be good grips. Some nice fat ODI Rogues work well if you have to stick with round grips. But I've foud that Ergon GP1 grips work very well and are quite comfortable. I don't like them for off road as, for me anyway, they seem to reduce control while braking and cornering in rough terrain. But on the commuter they are both very comfortable and afford excellent hand postion for longer rides. And by spreading out the load on your hands more they also lessen the effects of vibration quite a bit. They take some getting used to, they feel totaly different than a traditional round grip, and it takes a bit of tweaking to get them positioned just right, but they're worth it IMHO.

    I think a combination of the three, wider tires run at lower pressure, a more forgiving carbon bar, and good grips, would go a long way toward mellowing the handle bar hammering your getting now. I know, I ride an old Trek aluminum frame with a ridged Surly 1x1 fork as a commuter. Without the above "refinements" it was like riding a jackhammer to work!

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    529
    +1 for the fatter tires.
    I'm running 1.9s at 45 psi on my rigid commuting bike and haven't noticed much if any increase in rolling resistance and plan to get slightly fatter tires once these wear out.
    I used to run them at their max rated pressure - 60psi - and found the increase in comfort, grip and feel at lower pressure remarkable. I'd try lowering the pressure even more but they are semi slicks and at lower than 45 the side knobs start to touch and the RR goes up.
    I'm impressed enough at the difference that my road bike is getting a 700x25c instead of the twenty-threes that is on there now once its current tires wear out as well.

    If anything on bumpy roads rock hard tires probably slow you down and increase the rolling resistance.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    428
    I've found some 2007 model Easton 23" flat carbon bars new for $65 that I'm going to get. I also just got some Oury grips that are a lot fatter than my old worn out Yeti grips. I think these changes will help a lot.

    As far as tires, I think I'll try to live with my 1.5 Schwalbe Marathons for now since I just bought them. I might drop the pressure some tho.

    I also decided to try out a cheap springloaded seatpost that my LBS had. I haven't ridden with it yet. I'll post up if it turns out to be a revelation or a dud.

    Thanks for all the great suggestions!

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,077
    carbon bars

    ESI grips

    Bontrager bzzzkill dampers, though I think they are made for road bike bars.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    428
    My carbon handlebar got here today and it is SWEET! Only problem...they sent me a 31.8mm when I ordered a 25.4mm. Someone in their warehouse slapped the wrong sticker on the box.

    Damn.

  14. #14
    ≈ > ♥
    Reputation: zahgurim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    918
    Carbon or ti bars would help out dramatically. Seatpost, too.

    Once you ride a ti seatpost, you'll never run anything else on a hardtail...

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    428
    Ok...I finally got the correct size handlebar and I got to ride with it on Friday. I have to say it is worth every penny! All of the high-frequency buzz is completely gone. I even intentionally ran over a bit of washboard where someone had driven on the asphalt with truck traction tires before it was cool...nice and buzzy. I could feel it through my pedals but not through my hands. Hand fatigue is also gone. This is such a vast improvement...it is well worth the money.

    By the way, the bar is a 2007 model Easton EC70. I got it from Blue Sky Cycling for $65.

    http://www.blueskycycling.com/produc...-Handlebar.htm

    Thanks for your help, all!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    175
    Dude, I'm so glad that worked for you. It's a great example of how little improvements in componetry can make HUGE differences in performance. When I built my "dream" commuter last winter, I went "whole hog" and haven't regretted a bit of it. Those of us who put 50 - 120 miles a week on our bikes need to remember that the little creature comforts help us stay on the program. That being said, I'm curious...what's next for you as far as upgrades go?

  17. #17
    Frt Range, CO
    Reputation: pursuiter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,436
    Quote Originally Posted by citybiker
    ...what's next for you as far as upgrades go?
    The carbon bars are great, another one is the Thudbuster. It's been a miracle cure for my 47 year old back. I have the ST version on my rigid 29er commuter, the LT version on my HT trail bike.

  18. #18
    fmf
    fmf is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    328
    Glad to hear the carbon bars are workin for ya! Maybe I'll give it a try on my old cro mo MTB rigid commuter...

    BTW are u still running the tires at 80psi?

    I'm running Panaracer 1.25 T_Serv tires at various psi's. At 125 they really roll but just too harsh... Especially on the ride home.. I ride mostly road but have a little trail on my commute. At the lowest psi, don't roll as fast but much smoother... Still lookin for the perfect psi for me.

    Oh yeah, how are the new carbon bars off road? Have u tried?

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    428
    Quote Originally Posted by citybiker
    what's next for you as far as upgrades go?
    I'm seriously considering a Thudbuster. I work a few miles from Full Cycles and they are about the cheapest around...even on the net! I'm debating between the LT and the ST. I think I'm right at the limit as far as minimum extension for the LT. If I get that, I won't be able to drop my seat if I head out into the woods.

    I also want to get a DiNotte 200L headlight to illuminate the road as the days get shorter.

    Quote Originally Posted by fmf
    BTW are u still running the tires at 80psi?
    Nope. I upped it to 90. The el-cheapo springloaded seatpost I am experimenting with is doing a good enough job at soaking up the little stuff. It is pretty cheesy though and I would prefer a Thudbuster.

    Quote Originally Posted by fmf
    Oh yeah, how are the new carbon bars off road? Have u tried?
    I haven't. I still need to get in a little better shape before I go busting my ass in the woods. I have to say, though...the bike seems really easy to ride after taking off the 30 odd pounds of crap I haul to work.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    428
    Quote Originally Posted by fmf
    I'm running Panaracer 1.25 T_Serv tires at various psi's. At 125 they really roll but just too harsh...
    Been there, done that. I used to have some 1.0 tires running at 125psi. They were essentially time trial tires. It was like being on bare rims. And I really had to watch for road debris.

    The Schwalbe Marathon 1.5 tires I'm running now roll nice and are beefy enough to take some punishment. They also appear to be good for rain which will really matter here in Oregon before too long.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •