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  1. #1
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    Trek's new belt driven commuter

    Now that's the kind of commuter I was searching: stylish -to me at least- and real clean and convenient as it's belt driven, awesome bike!

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...rict/district/

  2. #2
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    I really wonder if belts are any better than the standard chains. Yes they are quieter, but what about rocks getting stuck in them? When I used to run R/C touring cars, the belt transmissions were the worst part on reliability, evenutally the whole car would stop if any loose stones got into the belts and would often result in a torn belt, or damaged pulley.

  3. #3
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    This thing is really cool- now we commuters can get indignant like the fixie messenger dudes (and dudettes) about the mainstreaming of their culture! Damn, now anyone can just buy into this whole commute by bike thing and see how awesome it is, this sucks!

  4. #4
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    I just found my next bike...

  5. #5
    Frt Range, CO
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    belt drive = solution looking for problem. Perfect for a Trek

  6. #6
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    They could at least leave some room for decent full-size fenders. Under those little baby brakes, looks like a tough fit.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch2
    This thing is really cool- now we commuters can get indignant like the fixie messenger dudes (and dudettes) about the mainstreaming of their culture! Damn, now anyone can just buy into this whole commute by bike thing and see how awesome it is, this sucks!
    Usually the teeth are cut out in the low horizontal spots to allow gunk to pass through without getting ground up. The belt only needs the vertical sides to engage. I like the idea of belts, but I'd have to ride one for a while before I ever committed. They also require much higher tension than a chain, and the frames have to be compatible.

  8. #8
    Frt Range, CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    ...They also require much higher tension than a chain, and the frames have to be compatible.
    What about drag, with high tension comes drag. I wish someone would bring back the enclosed chain. Those old Raleighs had enclosed chain and rod brakes (no cables). Add the Sturmey Archer 3 speed and you had the ultimate commuter, good for thousands of miles, no maintance.

  9. #9
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    $1k for a single speed? I think not. Stick an internal gear hub on it and you might have something worth considering. That would be a nearly maintenance free setup and would be good for all weather commuting.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by pursuiter
    belt drive = solution looking for problem. ..........
    I night have to agree with that statement. The simplicity of a chain drive works perfectly fine with not a lot of maintenance, really. And besides, you'd have to carry a spare belt in case of breakage (and it'd be a proprietary part available from Trek, as opposed to picking up another chain at any half decent lbs), whereas a chain you can carry a few extra links or just run it a lil short if it breaks. I'll keep my chain drive and multiple cogs/rings, thanks My Fuel commutes right nice as is...!!!

  11. #11
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    Hold on a minute, belt drives are tougher than chains, they're widely used in car and motorcycle engines and are not Trek propietary. Anyway, for a not competitive bike it's a very smart solution, say goodbye to grease and ugly chain covers.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweezak
    $1k for a single speed? I think not. Stick an internal gear hub on it and you might have something worth considering. That would be a nearly maintenance free setup and would be good for all weather commuting.
    [SIZE=2]They’ve done just that with a Shimano Alfine 8spd hub on a Trek Soho, I’ve been told it will be available for 09 but I can’t see it on the site…[SIZE=2]Just whip the mud guards and bottle off and it’s ready to go, think I might change the hubs though, actually I think it may be better to get the Trek District and buy an Alfine hub to go with it. [/SIZE][/SIZE]

    See third pic down...

    [SIZE=2]http://bicycledesign.blogspot.com/20...-world-09.html[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]
    [/SIZE]

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by acelp11
    ...belt drives are tougher than chains, they're widely used in car and motorcycle...
    So are driveshafts. Chains suck on derailliuer bikes, on a 1x1 they work really well. So the belt will be replacing the chain in the application where chains work well. Very non-standard for bikes will make it hard to establish a market. I already own a couple sets of Shimano Dyna Drive cranks/pedals

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by pursuiter
    So are driveshafts. Chains suck on derailliuer bikes, on a 1x1 they work really well. So the belt will be replacing the chain in the application where chains work well. Very non-standard for bikes will make it hard to establish a market. I already own a couple sets of Shimano Dyna Drive cranks/pedals
    The main point about belts is that they are perfect for commuters as you don't need to worry about grease stains or carrying straps. Chains are sure better off-road, but for getting to the office belts have all the advantages.

  15. #15
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    I'm intrigued by the whole belt drive thing. The proprietary arguement is a good one IMHO. The possible maintenance problems arguement..ie. the belt will just all of a sudden snap thing seems unfounded. Much like another poster already said. If a belt can last thousands of miles on a car engine, or as the primary drive for a motorcycle, why could it not stand up to a human who puts out a fraction of the power.

  16. #16
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    As far as I know bike belts are not propietary.

  17. #17
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    Now if that was the Spot belt drive bike, all the people bashing Trek would be lauding Spot because they aren't a big company.
    1993 Barracuda A2R - 1x7 Beater
    2007 Redline Monocog 29er

  18. #18
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    Belts today are very strong and breakage should not be a concern. Rocks, however, might be something to think about. Harley Davidsons use a belt for their final drive and they last a very long time but when they pick up a rock they fail quickly and generally do damage to the drive pulleys in the process. Of course, you are dealing with forces WAY beyond what you would find on a bicycle.

    I would also think adjustment would be a concern. If the belt is even slightly loose, it may jump a tooth (or several) when you are really cranking on it.

    But like others here, I feel it's a novelty without a real reason to exist...not to mention overpriced and with limited capability.

    I guess my main concern would probably be vandalism. There's no novelty in a chain so nobody ever messes with them but I think it wouldn't be long before some d-bag cuts it for you...or in trying to cut it, weakens it to the point that it breaks on your next climb. It's just like someone keying a nice car.

  19. #19
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    I love it

  20. #20
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    A Hipsterised bike is a thief magnet. But agreed, it does look good.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by majura
    A Hipsterised bike is a thief magnet. But agreed, it does look good.
    Not hipsterized, hipsters unfortunately happen to like good looking, or usually ugly ass, single speeds. Treks are probably not "core" enough, brand-wise, for stupid hipsters .

  22. #22
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    yeah, but you can't shift. Look at the picture. No gears.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bee
    yeah, but you can't shift. Look at the picture. No gears.
    [SIZE=2]That’s why they call it a single speed, Shimano Alfine’s aren’t that expensive so it would be a good upgrade…
    [/SIZE]

  24. #24
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    toothed /V Belts are used in a number of high power/torque automotive and mining applications because of they're low maintenance, reduced noise levels & they are also highly resistant to stretching, a big plus on a bike....

    How often have you replaced a fan/accessory belt on your car??????

  25. #25
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    arent many car manufactures getting away from belts and going to chains? I cant name them all off hand, but it seems a lot more common these days to hear that a car has a chain instead of a belt. A belt or chain in a car is also under a hood and a lot less prone to pebbles and debris that gets blocked, whereas on the bike, its 6 inches off the ground and highly likely to pick up a lot of crap while commuting.

    Also, is Trek going to announce which belt they use so you can just pick one up at Autozone for 6 bucks or are you going to have to pay 35 bucks to your LBS for the exact same belt? You know theyre using the same belt as a Chevy or something...

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