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  1. #1
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    Time For The Winter Wheels

    Conti Sprinters just don't fare well on icy climbs.
    I was hoping to make it to December but some of the secondary roads here aren't plowed well and are covered with ice from freeze/thaw.
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  2. #2
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    I may have to break out my spare junk wheelset and knobbys tomorrow. Supposed to be a couple inches on the ground tonight.

  3. #3
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    1st winter for me anyone know how studded tires work on "black ice" thats the only thing im a bit worried about

  4. #4
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    I put the nokian studs on my rims this weekend...we have a couple inches down, but most of my commute route has the glare ice/snow combo on the shoulder...I expected them to be a great benefit and they really are...I tried them out around the neighborhood and was able to do controlled (rear brake/10-15mph) stops on glare ice with a water layer on it...they are fantastic for the spots where you go from clean pavement to ice and snow...any normal amount of caution and control should keep you plenty safe...I can't wait to get some fresh snow falling and pass all the cars stuck in traffic....

  5. #5
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    Hakkapeliitta's and a Fixed Gear make the best winter combo.
    The future is not google-able. William Gibson

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MABman
    Hakkapeliitta's and a Fixed Gear make the best winter combo.

    Freddie Revenz Mavic's and full suspension, I love passing couriers and others on that set-up.

    Bomber in the ruts, bomber on ice. Think training weight on pavement, and go hard.

    Fixies and single speeds are way too slow, to have much fun.

  7. #7
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    I commute in Toronto, Canada. 90% of the winter the roads are bare or mildly slushy. This winter I am considering studded tires - primarily to avoid that one in a million wipeout into traffic on a patch of black ice (almost happened today because I haven't replaced my commuter "slicks" yet).

    Will riding with studs on bare pavement the other 90% of the time be a huge pain though? My commute is about 30 mins through downtown.

  8. #8
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    Studs gip ice great....

    and they're good in snow or snow pack. Things can get a little dicey though on pavement. The studs will tend to slip on pavement before rubber will. So you have to use a little caution with them. Hard lean corners are pretty much out of the question on bare pavement with studs. You'll also have to get used to reduced braking traction to some extent. The studs dig into ice and such just fine, but they can't dig into pavement so they skip or slip. This is esspecially true of concrete surfaces, but will occur on tarmac, ashphalt, etc.

    Anyway, they won't be a "pain", but they will take some getting used to. They don't have the same traction qualities as a "rubber only" tire on bare pavement. So caution and experimentation are required until you have the quirks of the studs on various surfaces down. They're great for snow and ice, but can be a bit of a nusance on bare pavement.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Super Dude
    I commute in Toronto, Canada. 90% of the winter the roads are bare or mildly slushy. This winter I am considering studded tires - primarily to avoid that one in a million wipeout into traffic on a patch of black ice (almost happened today because I haven't replaced my commuter "slicks" yet).

    Will riding with studs on bare pavement the other 90% of the time be a huge pain though? My commute is about 30 mins through downtown.

    Basically no it will be fine.

    I ride Calgary we get snow and ice then a chinook and bare pavement. I use studs to avoid wiping out on a patch of ice...

    Something like a Nokian Mount and Ground has two rows of studs the contact the pavement just a little bit when riding straight. but really dig in on corners...

    The studs hook-up fine for traction on bare pavement as well...cause the studs go into the little holes etc in the asphalt of the concrete.

    They do increase rolling resistance, that is the down side...

    Studs are slippery on polished concrete steel, roots etc.

  10. #10
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    I'm in Calgary as well, and I echo jeffscott's comments. Nokian Mount and Ground or the sold-at-MEC Schwalbe Snow Stud are both great for commuting. Okay rolling resistance, good all-around grip on most road surfaces, the tungsten carbide studs last for years.

    If you are going to lean hard on a corner, you'll want to let the back end come around and counter-steer or something. Brake in, throttle out works well.

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