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  1. #1
    Bikeaholic
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    Stan's Flow rims with a 32c tire. Bad idea?

    Does anyone out there use a pavement tire with Stan's Flow rims? I've been contemplating the idea of a set for my commuter. I run 32 or 35c tires year round. My tire pressure is always 80 or above. On the Stan's website it states that the flow rim has a max pressure of 40psi. with a 2.0 tire. I was curious on everyones thoughts on this.

    --Thanks

  2. #2
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    I ran some 32c tires on Stan's Wheels (355 F/ Arch R) for a thousand or so miles of commuting. I started with 2 Schwalbe Marathon Plus - had a bad sidewall leak on one that Stan's wouldn't seal and replaced it with a Panaracer Somethin' Somethin' of the same size.

    I ran the tires at 80 PSI and for the first 800-900 miles did not have a problem. However, as the tires got worn and possibly degraded on the inside from the Stan's, when I did get a leak, the Stan's could not seal it with the high air pressure. I patched the tire a few times before finally putting in tubes and then eventually just going back to running my Racing Ralph's as a commuter tire.

  3. #3
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    I forgot to mention I use tubes and would do so with this set up. Thanks for the info. My main concern was the rim handling the pressure. I've used cheap beach cruiser tires on my mountain bike in the past. The pressure was around 80 or a little more with the stock Alex rims.

    --Ice

  4. #4
    jrm
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    As long as the tire is

    wider then the inside bead of the rim your fine. I use 30/32c CX tires on my NINER and it works well. I crank um up to 100 psi.
    Wreck the malls with cows on Harleys

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    The rule of thumb on Sheldon Brown's site is that tires should be from 1.45 to 2x as wide as the inside width of the rim.

    Which is more-or-less the same as what the above poster says, but if you can't try the tires before buying, it's nice to have a quantitative way to predict whether or not it'll work.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    Thanks everyone so far for the info. The extra width will be nice with 40c Nokians in the winter. I'm not sure when I'll get these built. As soon as my finances allow at this point.

    --Ice

  7. #7
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    I am running Conti Top Contacts in 32 on Arches. Here was their response to my inquiry on running higher than recommended pressure. Straight from the horse's mouth so to speak.

    If you are using a tube you can run what ever you want. If you want to run them tubeless. I believe those tires a wire bead. 50psi should be fine. If they are folding bead i would stop at 45psi.

    Pete Kastner
    NoTubes.com
    202 Daniel Zenker Dr
    Big Flats NY 14814
    607-562-2877

  8. #8
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    Cool, thanks for the info.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    The rule of thumb on Sheldon Brown's site is that tires should be from 1.45 to 2x as wide as the inside width of the rim.
    I was intrigued when I saw this so I went looking for it. It's on this page. Trouble is, on this page he provides a table of tire/rim width combinations that is not only irrational but inconsistent with the recommended range of 1.45 to 2x.

    It seems to me that the 1.45-2x recommendation is nothing more than a codifying of traditional road tires and rims. If you stay within that range you will likely be golden but there are examples every day of both road and MTB pros riding setups that don't conform. My XC MTB tire, with a casing width of 54mm, falls outside the 2x range despite using an AM rim that most would consider generous. Likewise, I have used road tires on rims well below the 1.45 ratio with complete success and the trend toward wider road rims makes that common. In fact, the road racing standard of matching rim and tire width for best aerodynamics makes meeting the 1.45x threshold nearly impossible. I would classify this recommendation as incredibly conservative.

  10. #10
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Sheldon himself comments that the chart and guideline are both pretty conservative. I'll probably still try to stay within it for the bikes I ride on the road, although I think the upper limit for a tire/rim ratio for a bike ridden off-road is probably closer to 3x or 4x width. Using three significant figures for a guideline struck me as a bit odd too, come to think of it.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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