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  1. #1
    Back in the Saddle Again
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    Somewhat of an annoyance

    I bought my bike back in May and have had issues with the rear rim from day one. Finally it got to the point I was not going to invest more time or money into it, so I contacted bikesdirect.com and said I wanted a new rim. Due to the possibility of it being shipping damage they said show the issue and they will help.

    I had to film the issue (flat spot) and when sent they were fast to send a replacement. The same day actually. So Thumbs up to BD.com for killer CS!

    Now to the annoying part. I have to use my existing rotor on the new rim. I took a look into what it's going to take to replace it and since I do not have the means to do the work myself (something I am trying hard to remedy) that leaves time and money. The two things that keep me from going to the LBS to have them work on the rim up to this point. It's a 4 to 10 day turn around depending on the shop just to tru a rim, who knows the time/cost to mount a rotor.

    So here I will have a new rim, but still stuck with the issue of not being able to afford the work or the downed time for it to be done.

    Arrrg!

  2. #2
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    The torx key you need to remove and reinstall the bolts holding the rotor on is only about $5 at a hardware store. Kind of a dumb name, make sure they know you don't want a torque wrench, which is a lot more expensive). They should be by the other hex or "allen" wrenches. Just snug them up and recheck them after riding a bit. Or spend a bit more and get a bike multitool with a torx and you'll have something you can use for a lot more adjustments etc.

  3. #3
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    Thank you for the heads up! That I think I could swing.

  4. #4
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    You could just bring the whole wheel to the hardware store to make sure you get the right bit. Torx comes in a lot of sizes and I tend to have all of them except the one I need.

  5. #5
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    T-25 is pretty much the accepted standard for disc brake bolts.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    You could just bring the whole wheel to the hardware store to make sure you get the right bit. Torx comes in a lot of sizes and I tend to have all of them except the one I need.
    I'll likely do that since I already have a habit of bringing my bike in to place when fitting something is required.

  7. #7
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    Not all rotors attach with Torx. Shimano centerlock uses a Shimano splined tool which you won't find at a hardware store. Also, if you can't call a shop and have them swap a rotor while you wait I wouldn't use them either, but it should be pretty quick and cheap (especially if it is a centerlock because there is no alignment & 1 piece to unscrew/screw, it's about a 2 min job max).

  8. #8
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    Being new to this, I know it lists the following;

    TEKTRO NOVELA DISC BRAKE FR/RR 160mm Rotors

  9. #9
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    Also, if you can't call a shop and have them swap a rotor while you wait I wouldn't use them either, but it should be pretty quick and cheap (especially if it is a centerlock because there is no alignment & 1 piece to unscrew/screw, it's about a 2 min job max).
    I have no idea how long it takes to change a bicycle brake rotor, but he needs a rim laced too.
    Recalculating....

  10. #10
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    You could always call the bike shop and explain the downtime issue. If you're getting the rim laced/tensioned/trued that can take some time, but if you can set up an appointment with the tech ahead of time you could probably get it done same day. I've found bike shops to be pretty approachable/human about that sort of issue. You'll still have to pay for the work (if it really was damaged in shipping then BD may help you there) but at least you'll save the time.

  11. #11
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    Those rotors aren't centerlock so you should be OK with the hardware store route.

    I was assuming he got a whole new wheel since he was only worried about mounting the rotor.

  12. #12
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    The CS guy said I just reuse my current tire, tube, rotor, and skewer on the new wheel.

  13. #13
    jrm
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    yeah do it yourself. But be aware of the torque values labeled on the rotor b/c those aluminum threads in the hub will strip pretty easy.
    Wreck the malls with cows on Harleys

  14. #14
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    If you use a small T25 wrench (such as the ones that come with Avid brake/bleed sets, and are akin to glitter in a bike shop) it's almost impossible to strip the threads in a hub. Also, a T25 bit will usually strip before the bolt. Shouldn't try it, but there it is.

    Typical tightening torque is just about 6 NM force.

  15. #15
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    it's the busy season. larger repair jobs get scheduled in advance. small stuff can be done on the spot. truing a wheel tends to fall under the larger project category and removing/installing parts can often be done while you wait.

    but for this, I agree to do it yourself. It's easy enough.

  16. #16
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    I was assuming he got a whole new wheel since he was only worried about mounting the rotor.
    Looks like you were right. I think? Sorry for the distraction.

    Don`t Torx drivers usually come as sets anyway? I don`t think I`ve seen them sold individually, though I haven`t checked.
    Recalculating....

  17. #17
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    HA! I think I have a set of those as sockets in my tool bag!! I'mm have to look but I think I am golden!

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